John G. Whitney

b. April 1829, d. 29 January 1904
  • Company: 1_SS
  • John Arnott was an alias he used in the 1st MA Sharpshooters.
  • John G. Whitney was born in Apr 1829 at New York.
  • In 1862 John was living at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment, John gave his occupation as sailor.

  • On 19 Nov 1862 John G. Whitney mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 33 years and 7 months old.
  • On 25 Apr 1863 John ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters at Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia, being discharged for disability.

  • In 1888 At the time of his entry into the Soldiers' Home, he gave his next-of-kin as:
    Mrs. Amelia (Whitney) Fuller, b. ca 1825 in New York, who married Russell Fuller before 1850, (he was b. ca. 1821 in Ohio), and they later lived in Willoughby, Lake County, OH.
  • On 27 Oct 1888, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (Northwestern Branch), Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, John was admitted, from Illinois.
  • On 7 Mar 1889, John was dropped from rolls.
  • On 19 Apr 1889, John was readmitted from Northwestern Branch.
  • He made application at Pennsylvania for a veteran's pension on 16 Jul 1889, and received certificate number 695228.
  • On 2 Feb 1892, John was transferred to Central Branch.
  • On 11 May 1894, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Hampton, Elizabeth City, Virginia, John was transferred from Northwestern Branch.
  • On 21 Sep 1894, John was transferred to Marion Branch.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1900 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (Northwestern Branch), Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, as:
    Whitney, John G., member, b. Apr 1829, single, b. NY (of NY parents.)
  • He died on 29 Jan 1904 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion, Grant County, Indiana, unmarried. He was 74 years and 9 months old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1904 at Marion National Cemetery, Marion, Grant County, Indiana, Grave no. 932, Circle no. 7, (Section 1, site 1015.)
  • Last Edited: 14 Apr 2016

William Blake Whitney

b. 23 August 1841, d. 30 September 1891

William B. Whitney
  • Father: Joseph Whitney b. 18 Dec 1794, d. 6 Apr 1873
  • Mother: Sally Harrington b. 15 Sep 1804, d. 26 Jan 1859
  • Company: A
  • William Blake Whitney was born on 23 Aug 1841 at Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Joseph Whitney and Sally Harrington.
  • William Blake Whitney was enumerated in the household of Joseph Whitney and Sally Harrington in the 1850 US Federal Census on 1 Aug 1850 at Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where his father, Joseph, is a carpenter with $3000 in estate, and his brother, Francis, is also a carpenter.
  • On 26 Jan 1859 his mother, Sally Harrington, died at Massachusetts at age 54.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, William gave his occupation as carriage maker.
  • In 1861 William was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years, 10 months and 19 days old.
  • William Blake Whitney and Sumner Moore Frost, future brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company A.
  • William Blake Whitney was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Blake Whitney was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William B. Whitney was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • He was declared missing in action on 30 Jun 1862 at Nelson's Farm, Virginia.
  • On 6 Sep 1862 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 21 Jan 1863, and received certificate number 15244.
  • On 15 Sep 1863 Sumner Moore Frost and Ellen A. Tilton, daughter of William Tilton and Mary Laurentia Barber, were married at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 15 Sep 1863 William Blake Whitney, 22, married Julia Pauline Tilton, 20, daughter of William Tilton and Mary Laurentia Barber, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • (Note: the Tilton girls appear to have had a double wedding.)
  • In 1864 William Blake Whitney was mechanic.
  • Starting 22 Aug 1864, William also served in the 4th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, Company H.
  • He ended his service on 17 Jun 1865.
  • On 4 Jul 1868 William Blake Whitney was included on the Civil War memorial at Main Street, Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, From the "Massachusetts Spy," (Worcester, Massachusetts), 17 July 1868:
    A very fine soldiers' monument of Fitchburg granite, with curb of the same material, was dedicated in Westminster, July 4. It stands 22 1/2 feet high, the names of 82 soldiers being on marble slabs attached to the sides of the monument.
    The dedicatory services proper consisted of prayer, singing of an original ode, floral demonstration, an address, the reading of a poem, and the playing of a dirge by the Gardner Brass Band. A free dinner was provided in the grove....speeches were made by Captain Holden and General Kimball....
  • He and Julia Pauline Tilton were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 14 Jun 1870 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Whitney, William B., 28, works in carriages, b. MA
    ---, Julia P., 27, b. VT
    ---, Joseph T., 5, b. MA
    ---, Joseph, 75, b. VT
    Pierce, Harriet E., 24, domestic, b. MA.
  • On 6 Apr 1873 his father, Joseph Whitney, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 78.
  • On 23 Oct 1876 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Blake Whitney was reported present at the 10th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts in an article in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • He and Julia Pauline Tilton were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William B. Whitney, 38, baby carriage manufacture, b. MA
    Julia P. Whitney, 37, wife, b. VT
    Nellie J. Pierce, 20, (single) daur (sic), b. MA
    Joseph T. Whitney, 15, son, b. MA.
  • William B. Whitney was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A.
  • His final illness was reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
    Serious Illness of W. B. Whitney
    There was sad news telegraphed to town Thursday afternoon. William B. Whitney, a member of the F. A. Whitney Carriage company for several years and one of our best citizens, went to Canada on a hunting and fishing excursion in hopes to improve his health and seek a little recreation. For some years, his health has been quite poor.
    His family and the town were quite anxious and troubled when the telegraph brought the news that he was at a hotel in Montreal and to come quick as he was dangerously ill. His family made immediate and hasty preparations to reach him as quickly as possible. There are apprehensions that he may not recover.
    Joseph Holman, a member of the F. A. Whitney Carriage company, reached Montreal, Thursday at 8 a.m. and telegraphed to Mrs. William b. Whitney that he found her husband comfortable. He was in a private hospital and everything was being done for his comfort and to restore his health so he can be removed to his home in Leominster. The telegram informed his wife not to come until she received another report.
  • He died on 30 Sep 1891 at Montreal, Canada. He was 50 years, 1 month and 7 days old.
  • He was buried in Sep 1891 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Section 9, Lot 45.
  • An obituary for William Blake Whitney was published on 2 Oct 1891 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Death of William B. Whitney
    William B. Whitney died in Montreal, Wednesday evening and his family arrived here Thursday evening with the remains.
    Mr. Whitney was born in Westminster, Aug. 23, 1841, and came to Leominster in 1853, and attended school here for a year or two, where he entered the employ of J. H. Lockey, manufacturer of pianos. He remained here till 1857, when he was employed by F. W. and F. A. whiting, who were peioneers in the manufacture of children's carriages. When the war broke out he enlisted as a private in Co. A, 15th Massachusetts volunteers. He was taken prisoner at Balls Bluff, and was held in Richmond about five months, when he was released and returned to his regiment. He was again taken prisoner and sent to Bell Island, where he remained for about a month, when he was exchanged and sent home for disability, but again enlisted in the Massachusetts heavy artillery, and served until the close of the war.
    In 1865 he agained entered the employ of the Whitneys, and when the Whitney Carriage company was formed he became a stockholder, and was superintendant of the machine department for a number of years. In 1886 Mr. Whitney retired from business on account of ill health, but since that time he has been able to be among his friend, of whom he had an unlimited number. He was a member of the Orthodox Congregational church and was a most constant attendant at devine worship. He was also a member of the Leominster club and his death is the first break in this circle of citizens since the organization of the club some nine years ago. He was a member of Charles H. Stevens Post 53, G. A. R.
  • On 22 Aug 1898 William and Julia's son, Joseph Tilton Whitney married Fanny Virginia Stevens at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Julia, his wife, outlived William and died on 17 Sep 1902 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 59.
  • Last Edited: 6 Apr 2013

Family: Julia Pauline Tilton b. 17 Oct 1842, d. 17 Sep 1902

  • Joseph Tilton Whitney b. 19 Aug 1864, d. 8 Mar 1945

William Lane Whitney

b. 10 September 1832, d. 14 November 1862
  • Father: William H. Whitney b. between 1809 - 1810
  • Mother: Mary Ann Parmenter b. 12 Aug 1812, d. 25 Mar 1882
  • Company: A
  • William Lane Whitney was born on 10 Sep 1832 at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of William H. Whitney and Mary Ann Parmenter.
  • William Lane Whitney was enumerated in the household of William H. Whitney and Mary Ann Parmenter in the 1850 US Federal Census on 31 Jul 1850 at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William H. Whitney, 40, laborer, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Mary Ann, 27 (sic)
    **William L., 17
    Mary A., 10
    Augustus, 8
    John W., 6
    Edward, 4
    Caroline, 2.
  • In 1862 William was living at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, William gave his occupation as farmer.
  • On 20 Apr 1862 William's sister, Mary A. Whitney, married Henry H. Parker at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 9 Aug 1862 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 29 years, 10 months and 30 days old.
  • He died on 14 Nov 1862 at Washington, DC, of disease. He was 30 years, 2 months and 4 days old.
  • He was buried after 14 Nov 1862 at US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery (Military Asylum Cemetery), Washington, DC.
  • On 14 Mar 1863 Mary Ann Whitney received a pension to surviving family member based on William's service; his mother, received certificate number 35704.
  • On 10 Nov 1869 William's sister, Caoline A. Whitney, married Erving Wallace Beaman at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1888, William was included in the Civil War section of Emerson's "Leominster Historical" as follows: "William L. Whitney, private, died of feaver at the hospital in Washington."
  • Last Edited: 14 Apr 2016

George Whittemore

b. 19 December 1836, d. 17 September 1862
  • Father: George Whittemore b. 17 May 1786, d. 16 Feb 1868
  • Mother: Anna Mansfield b. 18 Mar 1797, d. 5 Feb 1868
  • Company: 1_SS
  • George Whittemore was born on 19 Dec 1836 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of George Whittemore and Anna Mansfield.
  • George Whittemore was enumerated in the household of George Whittemore and Anna Mansfield in the 1850 US Federal Census on 20 Sep 1850 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as:
    George Whittemore, 64, merchant, $5000 estate, b. MA (as were all)
    Ann, 53
    Georgianna, 18
    Sarah, 15
    **George, 13.
  • In 1853 George entered Harvard College.
  • On 22 Aug 1853 George's sister, Georgianna Whittemore, married Charles Card Smith at Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment, George gave his occupation as Lawyer.
  • In 1861 George was living at Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 3 Sep 1861 George Whittemore mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 24 years, 8 months and 15 days old.
  • George wrote extensive correspondence, much of which is included in the letters quoted below from "Harvard Memorial Biographies", p. 379.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Washington, D. C, September 9, 1861.
    You ask if I am satisfied. I am as well satisfied as when I first formed the resolution to go to the war, and the whole affair has the same aspect as then. I have only one wish, which I have had from the first, that the war may be ended as soon as possible (not by compromise), and that we may go home. Some things here are better, and some worse, than I expected. Had a delightful bath yesterday morning. The creek, though not very wide, is deep in some parts, with high banks, covered with trees except where they open on a little meadow here and there. It reminds me of the North Branch of Concord River. Imagine one swimming up the North Branch. Wouldn't it be the non plus ultra of delightful bathing ? I suppose the creek runs into the Potomac.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    District Columbia, September 10, 1861.
    The day was intensely hot, and after waiting some time for marching orders, we went off to the shade of the woods. I was patient and comfortable, lay down, took out 'xxx' and did not care if we stayed there all day. But we were not so fortunate."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Camp near Edward's Ferry, September 29, 1861.
    I am very well and strong, and need to be to endure the work we are doing now. Last night some of our company went out on picket. We lay out on the tow-path in our blankets and overcoats, and I slept soundly with my cartridge-box for a pillow. At two, shots were heard, and our line jumped up, thinking the enemy were crossing the river. As I did not find myself killed, nor hear that any one else was, I was disposed to lie still and wait for something more. But the alarm had been given, and every man must pack up his goods and be in marching order."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Edward's Ferry, October 22.
    I begin to realize the risks and sufferings of war. I cannot well reconcile myself to parting from all I love in the world, but those left behind suffer more. If there is any consolation in the nest world, and I believe there is, I shall know it at once. However, I hope for the best, and do not think much about these things.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Edward's Ferry, October 22, 1861.
    It is dull, of course. It is not the life I should choose, even in pleasant weather, unless I was a colonel or general, in which case there might be some enjoyment in it ; but as a private there is nothing to attract one who has such a home as I have. However, a man will not be miserable unless he has a very sensitive temperament, feels everything keenly, and broods over trouble. Now if I were constituted as you are, I could not endure this life a month ; but as I am able to bear disagreeable things, and have a latent relish for a loafing life, I am not at all miserable.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Edward's Ferry, October 28, 1861.
    We have seen our first fighting. We went over the river on Monday. The colonel or general commanding showed us the position of the enemy, and told us ' to go there and see what we could do.' .... Our company have done all the fighting at this place, with the exception of some shells thrown by the artillery. Our men both on Monday and Tuesday were put up close to the enemy, quite unsupported ; and this, with their being without food for twenty-four hours and doing nearly all the fighting, has, I find, gained them some credit with everybody. Even General Gorman, who calls the guns great humbugs, gives credit to the men.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    November 10.
    You thought, walking in those splendid autumn woods, it would be far preferable to die there than to die shut up in a sick-chamber with all the paraphernalia of sickness about you. Yes, I think so ; but perhaps the idea as it presents itself to my mind, of a sudden, painless death in full activity, even in battle, is not so pleasant for you to think of. To me it seems the most desirable form in which to meet it.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Camp Benton, November 20, 1861.
    The principal discomfort here arises from the impossibility of being neat. I was never fastidious, but cannot reconcile myself to the state of things here and to our crowded condition. We have eleven or twelve in tents which were made to hold eight. I shall break off, for the crowd of men and clatter of voices in this smoky tabernacle of ours seem to make the letter unfit to send to you, the pattern of fastidious neatness. I wonder if any of the smoke or other odors goes in the letter to Boston. I believe it can't be helped in the present state of things.
  • George was promoted to Corporal.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Camp Benton, December 4, 1861.
    Will go into the army ? If he does, I should advise him to get a commission. I have come to the conclusion that a man of ability and education is not only under no obligation to go into the ranks as a private, but that he ought not to. He thereby puts it out of his power to use his advantages. He has no opportunity to do any good proportioned to his ability. By looking about, may find a situation suited to him. In short, ' every man in his place.' You will see I have come to this conclusion by reflecting on my own case. You must not infer from this that I am unhappy. I can wait patiently for the end of this dull life, and much of it I enjoy."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    December 13, 1861.
    Send something more to read or study as soon as you find from my accounts that the mails are tolerably reliable."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Cumberland, January 12, 1862.
    I have had more pleasure and more hard work this week than in any month in camp. This is a mountain country, as you know, — the Alleghanies and the Blue Ridge. I like the mountain travelling ; and to me it is easier than any other, there is so much pleasant scenery all the way. The air is fresher and more invigorating. There is plenty of water, and the people are far more hospitable and intelligent than in the counties lower down on the river. Climbing these mountains is not so hard as Kearsarge or Mount Washington."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Pawpaw, March 7, 1862.
    It is one great satisfaction to me to reflect that you are not and cannot be here, or know anything of this life, and that in a few months (how long they seem!) /shall know it only as a thing of the past. You speak of being plentifully supplied with pure air. I think I can surpass you at your own practice. On our return from Blooming Gap we slept on the ground in a thick snow-storm, and I was surprised to find myself not very cold. A good fire at one's feet is a comfortable thing at such a time."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Yorktown, April 9, 1862.
    On Monday our company was not called into play until late in the afternoon, when we came in front of the Rebel batteries in two squads, supported by two regiments. Only our squad fired, and that with only thirty or forty shots ; but the Rebels answered with volleys that would have cut us up if we had not been protected by a small knoll. I posted myself behind a large tree near the top of the knoll, and received some credit for coolness, but it was the coolness of perfect safety. Some doubts arose in my mind when the first shell came. It burst over my head so near that I felt the hot air on my face and the presence of the gas in my ears, and it scattered the branches all around me ; but I thought it would not happen twice in succession, and stayed where I was. The Colonel, having found out what he wished to, retired, and we with him. It was growing dark, began to rain hard, and the roads, under the tramp of so many men, were mere sloughs. We had the choice to lie down in the mud or sit up all night about the fire. I chose the latter, and with a rubber blanket and a good fire was pretty comfortable.
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Camp near Yotktown, April 13, 1862.
    Dear Father, I have received ten letters during the week. I cannot tell you how precious they are to me. The love and kindness in them all are enough to make one contented, if not happy, in far worse circumstances than mine. I wonder if I shall ever see you all again. I have very little fear of being killed, a great deal more of being sick ; but T have not felt as though I were to die yet in either way. We are encamped, if the term may be used, — for we have no tents, and are sheltering ourselves in the cellar and out-buildings of a little farm-house, while the brigade are out in the fields and woods. Yesterday I spent the day with a dozen of our men in the outskirts of the woods, within two hundred yards of the works. We lay concealed and very quiet, so as not to draw their fire ; our orders being not to fire, unless they opened with cannon upon our troops elsewhere, in which case we were to shoot the gunners. As they did not fire excepting once, when they did no harm, we did not.
    The day was beautiful, the woods warm and pleasant, and I could not help enjoying it. How different the woods seem from what they have in former seasons. Now the sun shines warm as ever, the tops of the pine-trees whisper in the wind, and the dry leaves and pine needles are as luxurious to lie on ; but grape-shot and shells may at any moment come cutting everything to pieces. We don't sit in a social circle as in our picnics at home, but each one takes a tree to himself; and, instead of wandering round in pleasant meditations, we creep on our hands and knees, and talk in whispers."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Camp near Yorktown, April 21, 1862.
    Quarter of a mile from the Rebels' first battery is a rising ground, where the ruins of a fine house stand. There is little left but three large chimneys and the brick foundations of the house. These ruins have been the scene of the sharpshooters' operations for a few days past, and I have been mostly there. So little shooting has been going on, that we have been able to make our arrangements almost as we pleased, and we established ourselves in a style of luxurious comfort quite unknown to privates. From the furniture lying around, two men took bureaus and set them up by a chimney to rest their guns on. Another found a thick tree that divided about five feet from the ground. He cut out the notch large enough for his gun, and put up a seat behind it, where he spied around very much at his ease. I took a position at the side of a chimney, with a black walnut table in front, the leaf hanging down and making a tolerable protection from bullets, &c., at this distance ; and to cover my head I set up two or three timbers, charred rafters, &c., the ends slanting up over my head, leaving a narrow port-hole for the gun. It happened to do me service.
    Towards night our batteries, stationed very near the chimneys, threw some shell into the works, while we kept our guns levelled at their embrasures. At last, after our cannon had sprinkled their shot and shell in various parts of the fort, an iron howitzer, on the battery nearest and just opposite to us, which not a man had approached all day, now, touched off by an unseen hand, threw a charge of grape or canister at us. It struck the ground a few yards before us, and scattered. Some of the balls struck my table, knocked down one timber from before it, and scattered the nails, charcoal, &c., over the table. One ball glanced and struck a tub behind me. My companion behind the chimney wanted to know if I was ' hit.' He seemed to think a ball that struck behind me must have gone through me. This iron howitzer is the one the negroes fired when the place became too hot for the chivalry."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Near Yorktown, May 3, 1862.
    There has been more or less firing about us all day. Just now it is perfectly quiet, though at intervals there comes back to us the music of a band in the Rebel camp. Only the song of birds, the hum of mosquitoes, and an occasional woodpecker breaks the stillness. A gun goes off now and then, but reminds me, in the quiet, of a sportsman's fowling-piece rather than of a soldier's rifle. It is past three o'clock, and the rifle-pit in which I am writing begins to afford a little shade. Now that the days are longer and we can sit out of doors, my interest in these German books increases. I wish would be looking about for something more, and send it out, if the mails continue regular, in about a fortnight."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Kent Couet-House, Virginia, May 12, 1862.
    Three letters from you of different dates have just arrived. The day has been quite hot and dusty, for the passing of so many men, horses, and wagons have worn the sod away already. But how different everything looks since I received these letters!
    It was merely hot and dull before, now it might have been ten times hotter and duller, and these letters would have made up for all. So it would have been if they had come to me as they should, one at a time. But coming all at once, they are a greater pleasure, especially as they are all in different tones. I have finished the French books, but not ' Egmont' as yet. Have just received the ' Parasite,' and hope to be able to hold on to it until I finish it. If we have no longer marches than we have had recently, I shall have no trouble."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Fair Oaks, June 12, 1862.
    The Rebels continued throwing shell at intervals, and we had orders to go out and see if we could not silence the guns. Most of our available men had been sent in another direction ; but we mustered a dozen or twenty, and went along the front of our picket lines for a good place to fire from. It was not easy to find, for the Rebel guns were protected by the nature of the ground ; and that is perhaps the reason that they have been allowed to annoy us in this way with impunity. It seems, beside, to be the object not to bring on an engagement at present. The artillerymen say they have orders not to fire. We found a place at last within sight of the Rebel batteries, but also within easy range of their grape and canister and sharpshooters. It was at some old ruins on a ridge in a wheat-field, their cannon and sharpshooters being in the woods on the farther side, three or four hundred yards off. It was very warm out there in the sun. The stock of one of the rifles was blistered by it, and the barrels were too hot to keep one's hands on. We relieved each other by turns at the old ruins, while the rest stayed in the edge of the woods. A swamp was near by, with quantities of magnolias."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    June 15.
    I have enjoyed the day very much, most in picking magnolias for half an hour. It was a perfect delight. They grow on slim trees thirty feet higli, so slender I could bend them down by my weight, climbing up a few feet. The place was full of them, and every one had five or ten buds just at the right stage for picking, being half open. Many of the flowers are withered, many are in the green hard bud, and others all the way between."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    Fair Oaks, June 19, 1862.
    Our quiet life ended with May. On the 31st, we set out from the camp two miles the other side of the Chickahominy, grossed the river and swamp in water up to our knees, and stumbled on the enemy. Before a line of battle was fairly formed, the firing began, and our company, who have no place in a line of bayonets, and in the hurry of the moment had been assigned no station, was ordered to lie down. The shower of bullets fired over the heads of the line fell all about us, but only one of our men was hit. The fight here on Saturday night lasted not over an hour, but it was well after dark before it was decided. While it lasted it was furious, not broken for an instant, and at times swelling into a louder roar, like gusts of wind in a storm, as the Rebels charged up to one or another part of our line. The battle of Sunday was in the woods, and hidden from our view ; but we saw the regiments as they filed in, saw the smoke, and ^the wounded and prisoners as they were brought out. Our division was not engaged, occupying the battlefield of the day before."
  • George wrote a letter as follows:
    July 2.
    Another hard day's fight and another hard night's march yesterday. The Rebels attacked at noon, and the engagement continued till long after dark. To-day we have rain, which perhaps prevents them from following. I begin now to long for one quiet day without a battle. We have carried these rifles on our shoulders lately, and it is wearing the men down fast.


  • The telescopic rifles weighed from fifteen to fifty pounds. Whilst asleep in a barn, on one occasion, with men of his own and other companies, Whittemore's rifle was stolen from him. This happened a few days before the battle of Antietam ; and at the commencement of that engagement he was unarmed, and at liberty to be a non-combatant. He was urged, if not actually ordered, to remain in the rear.
    This he could not do. He went coolly toward the front, looking for a weapon. An officer saw him take a gun from a fallen soldier and calmly load and fire until he was hit and instantly killed. This occurred in the woods adjoining the corn-field where Sedgwick's division met with its heavy losses.

  • He died on 17 Sep 1862 at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland. He was 25 years, 8 months and 29 days old.
  • "The next day, when the ground came into possession of the Federal army, his body was carefully and tenderly buried by his comrades, with a headboard inscribed, "Sergeant Whittemore." It was soon after removed to Mount Auburn. There it rests in a spot that was a favorite resort of his while in college. It is situated on the slope of Harvard Hill" (from Harvard Memorial Biographies.)


  • He was buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1866, George was included in Harvard Memorial Biographies, p. 379:
    George Whittemore, Jr.
    Private 1st Co. Mass. Sharpshooters, August, 1861 ; Corporal; Sergeant; killed at Antietam, Md., September 17, 1862.
    This memoir can be but a brief sketch, yet it aims to give glimpses of a cliaracter of much harmony and strengtli, and a career of persistent fidelity; though the one shrank from publicity, and the other was undecorated with the badges of rank.
    George Whittemore, Jr., son of George and Anna Whittemore, was born in Boston, December 19, 1837.
    He attended the public schools of that city, graduating from the Latin School, a medal scholar, in 1853. He immediately entered Harvard College, as a member of the Class of 1857.
    A few years before this his parents had removed to Gloucester, Massachusetts ; and there, on the sea-shore and in the woods, during his vacations, were early developed his simple tastes and the manly physical habits which added vigor to a naturally strong constitution. As a boy he was usually gentle and quiet; but the earnest spirit under his calm exterior flashed into energetic and lively action whenever he was thoroughly roused by social enjoyment, or moved by invitations to daring adventure. The force of will, never hardening into wilfulness, which he exhibited at a later period, was not manifested in his childhood. Under kindly domestic influence, there was little to call out the innate strength of his nature.
    At Cambridge he was a close student, ranking among the first twelve of his Class. He excelled as a classical scholar. As a writer, he took several prizes for English composition, and he was noted for his clear comprehension of abstruse metaphysical questions. He taught school during the winters of his Sophomore and Junior years at Gloucester, and in the winter of his Senior year at Northampton. He was fond of athletic exercises and expert as an oarsman. His devotion to his books and his retiring manners prevented his forming many intimate acquaintances ; but he was respected by all his associates and classmates for his fine intellectual and moral qualities.
    On leaving college he was engaged as an assistant in the private classical school of Mr. E. S. Dixwell in Boston. Whilst occupying this position, and afterwards in the office of Messrs. J. J. Clarke and Lemuel Shaw, he studied law. He passed the usual examination and was admitted to the Suffolk Bar on the very day when he left home as a soldier. In the summer of 1860, to recruit his health, he went with a small party on an excursion which was to have been continued for several months in the Southwest. An unusual drought in that part of the country compelled him to give up the plan when only partially executed, and he returned alone on horseback, visiting the Adirondack regions on his way back.
    The first years of his maturity found him a strong, well-balanced, self-contained man, able to bear and ready to help others bear all the shocks of life, with a rich, warm nature, but one expressing itself in deeds rather than in words, — full of tenderness and care for others, and quick of indignation against anything he felt to be unjust, inhuman, or wrong.
    On the breaking out of the war, he joined a drill-club ; but it was not until after the disastrous battle of Bull Run that he fully determined to enter the army. With him, to resolve was to act ; and he enlisted as a private in the First Company of Sharpshooters from his native State, in August, 1861. He had no acquaintances in the company, and joined it against the remonstrances of his friends, who felt that he was equal to and ought to take a higher position. He was not afterwards wholly satisfied with the step he had taken ; yet the considerations which decided his course were both characteristic and honorable, inasmuch as they prompted him simply to take the place in which he thought he could be the most useful. He was very near-sighted, and constantly used glasses ; was an expert with the rifle, and capable of enduring fatigue ; was doubtful of his military ability to act as an officer, and averse to the restraints and routine of an infantry regiment. For these reasons, he preferred at first, believing that the contest would be short, the independence and the opportunities for individual enterprise he hoped to find in an unattached command, and in the use of the telescopic rifle.
    What it meant for such a man to be a soldier in this way can easily be imagined. His prospect of a peaceful future had been bright. The cherished home of his childhood and youth held him in a loving embrace ; and there was one to be left upon whom he had bestowed his strongest aflections. All this was to be put in mortal peril, and yet he did not hesitate. He had everything to lose, nothing to win, as men usually count losing and winning. But the risk must be taken, the privation must be endured ; thus he felt and thus he acted.
    He was a faithful correspondent, writing constantly to his kindred and friends, most frequently to his father ; for between his parents and himself the relation was one of strong and tender mutual regard and entire confidence. His letters tell where and how he served ; what he became, or rather, how perfectly he continued to be himself during the twelve months spent amid scenes so strange and so distasteful in many respects to his whole nature. (Note: the letters quoted above follow here.) .....

    In view of his exceeding worth to others, and as we think of all he might have been had he remained with us longer, we cannot help feeling and saying, " George Whittemore died before his time." Yet it is only in this view, and only as we thus think, that we are allowed to deem his death premature. His life had already reached roundness and completeness ; his spirit was already trained to follow in its further growth its own aspirations. The memory of
    that spirit remains with us still, — a reality without a shadow on its clearness. And yet, alas ! there are those who will sometimes ask,
    " But who shall so forecast the years,
    And find in loss a gain to match ?
    Or reach a hand through time to catch
    The far-off interest of tears ? "

  • On 18 Jun 1867 George's sister, Sarah Whittemore, married John A. Dodd at Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 George Whittemore was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, on the 35th anniversary of the battle. (Articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 18 May 2017

Henry Francis Whittemore

b. 17 March 1832, d. 11 March 1912
  • Father: Jonathan Whittemore b. 3 Aug 1800, d. 20 May 1889
  • Mother: Elizabeth G. Chismore b. 31 Oct 1804, d. 23 Jun 1864
  • Company: B
  • Henry Francis Whittemore was born on 17 Mar 1832 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Jonathan Whittemore and Elizabeth G. Chismore.
  • On 8 Jun 1854 Henry Francis Whittemore, 22, married Ruby Church, 18, at Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Henry gave his occupation as stone cutter.
  • In 1861 Henry was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 29 years, 3 months and 25 days old.
  • Henry Francis Whittemore and Walden William Davis, future father-in-law and son-in-law, when Walden later marries Henry's daughter Laura as his second wife, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Henry was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Francis Whittemore was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • Walter Abbott Eames wrote a letter to Sarah Ann Ames, his wife, on 15 Nov 1861, mentioning Henry Francis Whittemore, as follows.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry F. Whittemore was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Francis Whittemore was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 24 Oct 1862 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He was enumerated in the household of Jonathan Whittemore in the 1880 US Federal Census on on 12 Jun 1880 at at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Whittemore, Jonathan, 79, farmer, b. MA
    ---, Henry F., 50, son, farmer, b. MA
    ---, Ruth (sic), 49, dau-in-law, b. ME
    ---, Mary, 24, dau, school teacher, b. MA
    ---, Laura, 22, dau, b. MA.
  • Henry Francis Whittemore made application for a veteran's pension on 26 Jun 1880, and received certificate number 231767.
  • On 20 Jul 1881 Henry and Ruby's daughter, Mary Elizabeth Whittemore married Willard S. Hathorn at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In Jun 1886 Henry was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. B, noting that he was a prisoner for four months.
  • On 10 Oct 1890, Henry was granted an increase in his pension.
  • On 8 Nov 1892 Henry's daughter, Laura Frances Whittemore married Walden William Davis, who had been a member of Company A, 15th Massachusetts, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • On 28 Jun 1894 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Francis Whittemore attended the annual reunion of Company B ("Fitchburg Fusiliers"). From The Fitchburg Sentinel, 28 June 1894
    Veteran Fusiliers' Reunion
    On a bright June day like this, 33 years ago, today, the Fitchburg Fusiliers marched down Main street to the old depot and took a train for Worcester where they, with the other companies of the 15th Mass. regiment went into camp at Camp Scott, remaining till Aug. 8, when they went to the front.
    The survivors of the company, with honorary members of the association and other friends, held their annual reunion at Whalom park, today. A good number of lady friends of the veterans were present.
    The business meeting was held in the grove at 11:30 a.m. The following officers and members of the company responded to roll call. Gen. John W. Kimball, Capt. Charles H. Eager, Lieut. J. Myron Goddard, Sergt. Walter A. Eames, Privates John R. Farnum, Artemas A. Gibson, William Gibson, Granville C. Hosmer, Wallace W. Holman, Edward S. Kendall, Herbert D. McIntire, Joseph B. Matthews, George G. Taylor, Henry F. Whittemore. Honorary members -- Harrington Sibley, Charles May, F. A. Monroe, Edward F. Kimball, Albert McIntire, Samuel Osborne, Elmer W. Holman, C. A. Tenney, C. H. Toomey, James Harrington.
    The record of the last meeting was read by the clerk, E. S. Kendall, and approved and the report of the treasurer showing a balance of $41.59 was accepted.
    The following officers were chosen -- Capt, John W. Kimball; first leiutenant, J. Myron Goddard, Wakefield; second lieutenant, Charles H. Eager, Belmont; clerk and treasurer, Edward S. Kendall, Westminster; auditors -- Gen. J. W. Kimball, Herbert D. McIntire, Artemas A. Gibson.
  • An article from the Fitchburg Sentinel, 7 Mar 1895 notes:
    The death of Joseph L. Moody leaves only the following officers and members of the old Fusiliers, Co. B, 15th Mass. regiment, residing in Fitchburg: Gen. J. W. Kimball, Granville Hosmer, Herbert D. McIntire, Artimas A. Gibson, Lemuel Gibson, William Gibson, Frank Scott and Henry Whittemore. The members of the company are widely scattered.
  • On 11 May 1898 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Francis Whittemore was mentioned in an article as an original member of the Fitchburg Fusiliers.
  • On 29 Jun 1901 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Francis Whittemore attended the 40th reunion of Company B.
  • On 3 Feb 1909 his married daughter, Laura Frances Whittemore, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 51.
  • Henry Francis Whittemore died on 11 Mar 1912 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of heart disease. He was 79 years, 11 months and 23 days old.
  • West Fitchburg:
    Death of Henry F. Wittemore

    Henry F. Whittemore, aged 79 years, died this morning at 10 o'clock, at the home of his daughter Mrs. Willard Hawthorne, Fairview street, of heart failure, with which he has been confined to his bed for the past three weeks. He was a native of this city, being the son of the late Jonathan and Elizabeth (Chesmore) Whittemore, and was born on Dean hill. He received his early education in the public schools of this city, and later learned the stone cutter's trade which he followed for several years.

    He was a member of the Fusiliers for several years prior to the Civil War, in which he served, having been a member of Co. B, 15th regiment. He was in the battle of Balls Bluff and was taken prisoner at that time. He was confined in prison in Richmond, Va., from October 1861, to February, 1862, when he was exchanged. He was then honorably discharged, owing to disability.
    Mr. Whittemore was married, June 8, 1854, in Augusta, Me., to Miss Ruby Church, of that place. Shortly after his return from the war he purchased a farm on the outskirs of this city and resided there until four years ago when he sold it to Leon Kenny of this city, and with his wife took up a residence with their daughter on Fairview street.
    Their union was blessed with three children one of whom besides his wife survives him. He is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. John F. Cushing of Ashburnham and Mrs. Charles K. Sawyer of this place, and one granddaughter, Miss Helen Hawthorne, of Rochester, N.A. He was a member of the First Baptist church. The funeral will be held from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Hawthorne, Fairview street, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, and interment will be in Forrest Hill cemetery. (Fitchburg Sentinel 11 Mar 1912.)

  • He was buried in Mar 1912 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Div. 2, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Magnolia Avenue.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Ruby Church b. Jul 1835

  • Mary Elizabeth Whittemore b. 26 Aug 1855
  • Laura Frances Whittemore b. 19 Jan 1858, d. 3 Feb 1909
  • Hattie E. Whittemore b. 1 Feb 1860, d. 14 Feb 1876

Henry Sweet Whittemore

b. 26 May 1821, d. 20 September 1895

Henry S. Whittemore
  • Father: Michael Whittemore b. 25 Dec 1781, d. 25 Sep 1871
  • Mother: Elizabeth Titterton b. 1789, d. 31 Oct 1866
  • Company: D
  • Henry Sweet Whittemore was born on 26 May 1821 at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of Michael Whittemore and Elizabeth Titterton.
  • On 8 Dec 1848 Henry Sweet Whittemore, 27, married Harriet M. Henry, 19, daughter of Jonathan Henry and Mary Gutterson, at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Henry Sweet Whittemore and Harriet M. Henry were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 22 Jun 1860 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Henry S Whittemore, 38, truckman, b. MA
    Harriet, 30, b. NH
    Henry M, 10, b. VT
    Harriet, 7, b. CT.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Henry gave his occupation as teamster.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 40 years, 1 month and 16 days old.
  • On 2 Jan 1864, Henry was reenlisted for a bounty of $419.32.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Henry also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company "G."
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 16 Jul 1865.
  • On 23 Apr 1868 Henry's daughter, Hattie M Whittemore married William H. Cushing at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 2 Nov 1871 Henry's son, Henry M. Whittemore married Edna M. Rankin at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Henry Sweet Whittemore and Harriet M. Henry were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Whittemore, Henry S., 58, woodworker, b. MA
    ---, Harriett M., 3??, wife, b. NH
    ---, George E, 18, son, works in saloon, b. MA
    McBride, Cyrus, 35, boarder, single, machinist, b. ME
    **Pitts, Esek, 43, boarder, married, bootshop, b. MA
    Cara, Emmanuel, 20, boarder, moulder, b. RI
    Taft, Isabella M., 31, boarder, b. CT
    (where Esek boards with his old comrade in arms, Henry.)
  • On 4 Feb 1885 Henry and Harriet's son, George E. Whittemore married Carrie Josephine Warren at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Henry Sweet Whittemore was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. D.
  • He died on 20 Sep 1895 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of heart failure. He was 74 years, 3 months and 25 days old.
  • He was buried on 22 Sep 1895 at Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, plot 1839-17-G, and the event was reported as:
    "Funeral of a Veteran. - The funeral of Henry S. Whittemore, who died at his home, 46 Myrtle street, Friday, after a long illness, took place from his late reisdence at 1:30 o'clock, Sunday afternoon, and was very largely attended. Mr. Whittemore was a member of Co. D, 15th regiment, and among the mourners were a number of his former comrades. The services were conducted by Rev. Charles E. Simmons. Mr. Simmons paid a glowing tribute to the high character of the deceased, both as a soldier and as a man. The bearers were: William H. Andrews, Luther D. Goddard, Frank Merrifield and Charles H. Bemis, all of them being members of the 15th regiment. The interment was at Hope cemetery." (Worcester Daily Spy, 23 Sep 1895.)
  • On 4 Oct 1895 Harriet M. Henry received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Henry's service; his wife, received certificate number 416262.
  • Harriet, his wife, outlived Henry and died on 1 May 1897 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of uterine cancer at age 67.
  • Last Edited: 13 Feb 2017

Family: Harriet M. Henry b. 19 Aug 1829, d. 1 May 1897

  • Henry M. Whittemore b. 1850
  • Hattie M Whittemore b. 1853, d. 25 Feb 1906
  • Lizzie F. Whittemore b. 24 Jun 1855, d. 29 May 1860
  • George E. Whittemore b. 31 Dec 1860

Leonard Samuel Whittier

b. 20 March 1842, d. 12 May 1864

Leonard S. Whittier
  • Father: Edward Tuck Whittier b. 13 Aug 1819, d. 9 Dec 1878
  • Mother: Elizabeth Jane Young b. 4 Sep 1822, d. 28 Oct 1902
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Leonard Samuel Whittier was born on 20 Mar 1842 at Deerfield, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, son of Edward Tuck Whittier and Elizabeth Jane Young.
  • Leonard Samuel Whittier was enumerated in the household of Edward Tuck Whittier and Elizabeth Jane Young in the 1860 US Federal Census on 8 Aug 1860 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Edward Z. Whittier, 40, post master & factor, b. NH
    Elizabeth J. 37, b. VT
    Charles A., 20, cordwainer, b. MA
    **Leonard S., 18, b. NH
    Francis L., 12, b. MA
    Willie E., 6, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Leonard gave his occupation as Clerk.
  • In 1861 Leonard was living at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 3 Sep 1861 Leonard S. Whittier mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 19 years, 5 months and 14 days old.
  • Leonard Samuel Whittier and Daniel Green Sturtevant, uncle and nephew, served together in the 1st Company, Andrew Sharpshooters.
  • On 27 Sep 1862 his brother, Charles Addison Whittier, died at Chambersberg, Pennsylvania, at age 22 from a wound received at the Battle of Antietam, while serving with Co. G, 13th Regiment Massachusetts.
  • On 25 May 1863 Leonard ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by discharge for disability.

  • Starting 5 Dec 1863, Leonard also served in the 59th Massachusetts Infantry, Company A.
  • He died on 12 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, killed in battle. He was 22 years, 1 month and 22 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1864 at Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Lot: 176-177, Grave: 8 (This is actually a cenotaph.)
  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2016

Noah Wilcox

b. 18 November 1820, d. 22 August 1885
  • Father: Benjamin Wilcox b. about 1805, d. 28 Jun 1825
  • Mother: Susannah [--?--] b. about 1805, d. 13 Jan 1825
  • Company: K
  • Noah Wilcox was born on 18 Nov 1820 at Rowe, Franklin County, Massachusetts, son of Benjamin Wilcox and Susannah [--?--].
  • Noah Wilcox married Julia E. Gaynor, daughter of Edward Gaynor and Anne [--?--].
  • Noah Wilcox and Julia E. Gaynor were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 16 Jun 1860 at Sutton P. O., Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Noah Wilcox, 38, laborer, $75 real estate, b. MA
    Julia E., 30, $450 personal estate, b. Ireland
    Mary A., 10, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Noah gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Noah was living at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 Noah mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 40 years, 7 months and 13 days old.
  • After Jul 1861 Noah ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability at an unspecified date.

  • Starting 2 Oct 1861, Noah also served in the 25th Infantry Regiment Massachusetts, Company H.
  • He ended his service discharged for disability on 29 May 1863 at New Berne, North Carolina.
  • The man of the 25th and the man of the 15th are not connected in the MASSCW, however this is the only Noah Wilcox in 1860 MA.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension in 1869, based on his service in the 25th Massachusetts, but no certificate number is recorded in the index.
  • He and Julia E. Gaynor were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 5 Aug 1870 at Blackstone P. O., Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with their daughter, Mary A., and a number of boarders.
  • On 25 Feb 1879 Noah's daughter, Mary Ann Wilcox married John Foran at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Noah Wilcox and Julia E. Gaynor were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1880 at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Wilcox, Noah, 65, laborer, b. MA
    ---, Julia, 65, wife, b. Ireland
    Foran, Mary A., 30, dau, divorced, b. MA.
  • Noah was a member of H. H. Legg Post G. A. R. of Uxbridge.
  • From the "Worcester Daily Spy," p. 4, 3 March 1883:
    Uxbridge - Forty members of the Grand Army, with their families, paid a surprise visit to Noah Wilcox Thursday evening, carrying with them refreshments and numerous gifts for their comrade, who has just recovered from a severe illness.
  • From the "Worcester Daily Spy," p. 3, 29 July 1885:
    Uxbridge - Noah Wilcox is very low with blood poisoning, resulting from an abacess under his left arm, and the chances are that he can live but a few days.
  • He died on 22 Aug 1885 at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 64 years, 9 months and 4 days old.
  • He was buried in Aug 1885 at Saint Mary's Cemetery, Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 1 May 1886 Julia E. Gaynor received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Noah's service; his wife, as Juliette, applied for a pension for his service in the 25th Massachusetts, but no certificate number is recorded in the index.
  • Juliette, his wife, outlived Noah and died on 26 Jun 1889 at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 14 Apr 2016

Family: Julia E. Gaynor b. 1829, d. 26 Jun 1889

  • Son Wilcox b. 12 Apr 1848, d. 17 Apr 1848
  • Mary Ann Wilcox b. 15 Nov 1849
  • Martha Wilcox b. 19 Aug 1854, d. 25 Aug 1854

Cassius Moore Wilder

b. 11 July 1844, d. 17 July 1862
  • Father: Warren Wilder b. 12 Dec 1815, d. 24 Oct 1881
  • Mother: Abbia Jane Weymoth b. 3 Feb 1818, d. 31 May 1893
  • Company: G
  • Cassius Moore Wilder was born on 11 Jul 1844 at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Warren Wilder and Abbia Jane Weymoth, (Note: calculation from age on roster gives DOB between 1842 and 1843; he appears to have lied about his age at enlistment.)
  • Cassius Moore Wilder was enumerated in the household of Warren Wilder and Abbia Jane Weymoth in the 1850 US Federal Census in Sep 1850 at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Warren Wilder, 33, machinist, b. MA
    Abby, 30, b. NH
    **Charles (sic), 6, b. MA
    Charles W Wilde, 4, b. MA
    Abby Wilde, 3/12, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Cassius gave his occupation as clerk.
  • In 1861 Cassius was living at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Cassius Moore Wilder and Henry Tyler Dudley, first-cousins, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Cassius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 17 years and 1 day old.
  • On 31 Aug 1861 Cassius ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts being detached to the signal service.

  • In Jul 1862 Cassius was suffering from typhoid fever.
  • He died on 17 Jul 1862 at Harrison's Landing, Virginia, unmarried, on board of the steamer Commodore on James River, Virginia, according to his tombstone. He was 18 years and 6 days old.
  • On 21 Jul 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Cassius Moore Wilder was reported on the list of sick and wounded on board the United States Hospital Steamer Commodore, from Harrison's Landing, July 15th and 16th.
  • An obituary for Cassius Moore Wilder was published on 3 Dec 1862 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: (Volume 91 # 49)
    Died, on board the steamer Commodore, between Harrison’s Landing and Fortress Monroe, July 17, of typhoid fever, Cassius M. Wilder, son of Warren Wilder of Wilkensonville. Age 18yrs. He enlisted in the 15th Reg. Mass. Vols., Co G and was subsequently attached to the signal corps."
  • He was buried in 1862 at The Wilkinsonville Cemetery, Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where his tombstone says that he died "on board of the steamer Commodore on James River, Va., July 17, 1862. Member of Co. G, 15 Mass." His father, Warren, his mother Abbia, and sister Abbia are buried with him.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Warren Wilder in the 1870 US Federal Census on 11 Jun 1870 at Saundersville P. O., Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Wilder, Warren, 54, ret. shuttle manufacturer, b. MA
    ---, Abbie Jane, 52, b. NH
    ---, Chas. W., 24, shuttle finisher, b. MA
    ---, Abbie J., 20, b. MA
    ---, Ella A., 16, b. MA
    ---, Levi, 13, b. MA.
  • Last Edited: 14 Apr 2016

Charles Wilder

b. between 1832 and 1833
  • Company: K
  • Charles Wilder was born between 1832 - 1833 at New York.
  • In 1863 Charles was living at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Charles gave his occupation as no occupation at time of enlistment is given for this man in Ford's history.

  • On 21 Jul 1863 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • On 23 Apr 1864 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Navy.

  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2012

Charles Henry Wilder

b. 22 October 1841, d. 12 May 1909
  • Father: Henry A. Wilder b. 6 Aug 1812, d. 15 Dec 1882
  • Mother: Susan Johnson b. between 1816 - 1817, d. 21 Mar 1849
  • Company: A
  • Charles Henry Wilder was born on 22 Oct 1841 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Henry A. Wilder and Susan Johnson.
  • On 21 Mar 1849 his mother, Susan Johnson, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption.
  • Charles Henry Wilder was enumerated in the household of Henry A. Wilder in the 1850 US Federal Census on 28 Aug 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where father Henry A. WILDER is noted as a widower and comb maker by occupation. Also enumerated -- Felicia EASTMAN, 52, widow, b. Stow, MA.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Charles gave his occupation as operative.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years, 8 months and 20 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Charles was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Henry Wilder was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles H. Wilder was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Feb 1862, Charles was paroled from prison.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • He was enumerated in the household of Hannah Spaulding in the 1870 US Federal Census on 1 Jun 1870 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Colburn, Hannah S., 63, housekeeping, b. MA (as were all in the household)
    **---, Charles A., 32, hostler
    ---, Charles H., 8
    ---, Fannie E., 10
    Shepley, David, 45
    ---, Sarah F., 36, dressmaker
    ---, Nellie C., 8
    Wilder, Henry A., 57, day laborer
    **---, Charles H., 28, works in ?? shop
    Heyes, Luella H., 20, works in paper box shop
    (Note: two veterans of the 15th Massachusetts in the same house.)
  • Charles Henry Wilder made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 10 Aug 1878, and received certificate number 1017427.
  • On 29 Jul 1903 Charles entered the Soldiers Home.
  • Charles Henry Wilder was was one of many soldiers who resided at one time or another at Soldiers' Home, Crest Avenue, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 12 May 1909 at Soldiers' Home, Crest Avenue, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, unmarried. He was 67 years, 6 months and 20 days old.
  • An obituary for Charles Henry Wilder was published on 13 May 1909 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Death of Charles H. Wilder at Soldiers' Home
    Charles Henry Wilder, a life-long resident of Leominster, and member of Charles H. Stevens Post 53, G. A. R., died Wednesday afternoon at the age of 67 years. Death resulted from the infermities of old age after an illness of several years. He was a native of Leominster and was born Oct. 22, 1841.
    He entered the service June 28, 1861, with several other Leominster men at Fort Scott, Worcester. He entered as a private in Co., A, 15th regiment, Mass. infantry, and was discharged as a private in July, 1864, at the expiration of his term. He fought at Balls Bluff where he was taken prisoner by the soldiers of the Eighth Virginia Confederates, Oct. 21, 1861, and was imprisoned in Richmond until Feb. 22, 1862. He was paroled and went to Washington. He came home on a furlough and was soon ordered back to camp and went to Annapolis until exchanged. He served in the quarter-master's department until mustered out of service.
    His intimate comrades during his service were Sumner M. Frost, L. A. Cook, John M. Robbins, Eugene A. Bennett, Curtis G. Morse and Jacob Rugg.
  • He was buried on 15 May 1909 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 18 Apr 2016

Cornelius Erasmus Wilder

b. 22 February 1838, d. 14 March 1902
  • Father: Erasmus Darwin Wilder b. 29 May 1811, d. 18 May 1870
  • Mother: Avilla Lincoln b. 28 Dec 1802, d. 10 Feb 1879
  • Company: A
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was born on 22 Feb 1838 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Erasmus Darwin Wilder and Avilla Lincoln.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was enumerated in the household of Erasmus Darwin Wilder and Avilla Lincoln in the 1850 US Federal Census on 4 Sep 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Erasmus D. Wilder, 39, m, $1300, b. Leominster, MA
    Arvilla Wilder, 48, f, b. Jeffrey, NH
    **Cornelius E. Wilder, 12, m, b. Leominster, MA
    **Edwin L. Wilder, 8, b. Leominster, MA
    Albert A. Wilder, 6, b. Leominster, MA
    Otis Wilder, 4, b. Leominster, MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Cornelius gave his occupation as cabinet maker.
  • In 1861 Cornelius was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Cornelius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 4 months and 20 days old.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder and Edwin Lincoln Wilder, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Starting 8 Sep 1862, Albert A. Wilder, his brother, served in the 20th Connecticut Infantry, mustering out on 13 Jun 1865 at Fort Lincoln, Washington, DC.
  • On 22 Jun 1864 Cornelius was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia.
  • On 25 Jun 1864, Cornelius was paroled from prison.
  • Daniel W. Freeman wrote a letter on 25 Jun 1864, mentioning Cornelius Erasmus Wilder, as follows: published in the Webster Times. (Click icon to read.)
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Cornelius ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • On 19 Jul 1871 Cornelius Erasmus Wilder, 33, married Ella Martina Pitts, 24, daughter of James Pitts and Lucinda Burditt, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder and Ella Martina Pitts were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 25 Apr 1885, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius was appointed night watch policeman by the town Selectmen.
  • On 1 May 1886 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius retired from his position as night policeman.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A, noting that he was a prisoner at Richmond.
  • He was a pall bearer at the burial of Edward Wilson on 22 Nov 1896 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was a pall bearer at the burial of Charles Franklin May on 25 May 1898 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was a pall bearer at the burial of A. W. Rice on 19 Dec 1898 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder and Ella Martina Pitts were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1900 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a salesman of dry goods, and she works in the store with him. Their one child is still living. Her widowed mother, Elvira D. PITTS, b. July 1825, in NY, lives with them. Also enumerated -- Delia BABSON, 28. b. Ireland, servant, and Edith M. RICHARDSON, 29, b. MA, a boarder.
  • Cornelius Erasmus Wilder died on 14 Mar 1902 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 64 years and 20 days old.
  • An obituary for Cornelius Erasmus Wilder was published on 15 Mar 1902 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Leominster: Death of a Veteran
    Cornelius E. Wilder died at his home, Gardner court at 5:30 Friday afternoon, after an illness covering a number of weeks. Mr. Wilder was born in this town, February 22, 1838, and except of the years spent in the army, he has made Leominster his home nearly all the time.
    He early learned the trade of piano case making and up to a few years ago was employed at that industry being a very skilled workman and a man highly respected by his fellow workmen.
    July 12, 1861, he enlisted in Co. A, 15th Mass. regiment, and almost immediately went to the front, and during the three years of his service he was an honor to himself, his town and the country, and saw some of the hardest kind of service, being engaged in the battles of Balls Bluff, Yorktown, West Point, Williamsburg, Fair Oakes, Seven Pines, Gains Mills, White Oak Swamp, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Gettysburg and the Wilderness, besides innumerable skirmishes. He was taken prisoner once and confined in Libby prison at Richmond, Va., but was paroled.
    He was a member of Charles H. Stevens Post 53, G. A. R., Tahanto Lodge, A. O. U. W., and the Leominster club, and in all of the organizations as well as by every citizen of his acquaintance, he was held in the highest esteem. He leaves a widow and one son. The funeral will be held at the house, Monday at 2 p.m.
  • He was buried on 17 Mar 1902 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in Section 13, Lot 37, after a funeral from his late home, which was attended by a large number of relatives and friends. Rev. F. J. Gauld conducted the services. The pall bearers were members of Post 53, G. A. R.
  • From Volume 1 of Crane's Worcester Memoirs, 1907 --
    CORNELIUS E. WILDER.
    The late Cornelius E. Wilder, of Leominster, was descended from sturdy Puritan ancestry, who immigrated at an early date in the colonial period, in order to escape persecution for their non-conformity to the teachings of the Established Church of England.
    He was a descendant of Thomas Wilder, who immigrated to New England prior to 1651, in which year he was admitted a freeman at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and in 1659 he settled in Lancaster, this county, where his death occurred in 1667.
    Thomas Wilder, a descendant of Thomas the immigrant, was one of the first settlers in Leominster and established the branch of the family in that town to which the principal subject of this sketch belonged.
    The descendants of the original Thomas are numerous. Not a few of them have acquired distinction and among the latter was Marshall P. Wilder, one of the founders of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.
    Cornelius E. Wilders' parents were Darwin and Averilla (Lincoln) Wilder of Leominster.
    Born in Leominster February 22, 1838, Cornelius E. Wilder acquired his education in the public schools, and after graduating from the high school was apprenticed to a cabinet maker. Having learned the trade he followed it in Leominster until the breaking out of the civil war.
    He enlisted as a private in Company A, Fifteenth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and left Leominster for the front June 28, 1861. At the siege of Petersburg in June, 1864, he was, with a large portion of his regiment, captured by the enemy, and was confined in Libby Prison from June 24, until July 8, when he was exchanged. He subsequently returned to Massachusetts and was mustered out with his regiment.
    When sufficiently recuperated Mr. Wilder resumed his trade and for some time was engaged in making pianoforte cases.
    He later established himself in the dry goods business at Leominster, and for the remainder of his life devoted his energies to that line of trade with gratifying success. In politics he was a Republican and although frequently solicited to accept nomination to public office he invariably declined. He died in 1902.
    In 1871 Mr. Wilder was united in marriage with Miss Ella M. Pitts, who survives him. She was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, November 12, 1846, daughter of James and Lucinda (Burditt) Pitts. In 1810, her grandfather, James Pitts. went from Taunton to Lancaster and purchased of Elias Sawyer a tract of land containing eighty acres, located in what was known as the South Woods. There he erected a frame house. Some five years later he removed his family there and settled permanently. He subsequently constructed a dam and erected a cotton mill which he operated by the waterpower thus obtained, and he conducted it successfully for the rest of his life. He died in 1835. His son, James Pitts, Mrs. Wilder's father, was what is sometimes termed a mechanical genius. In addition to operating a large cotton mill at Clinton, he persistently experimented in mechanics and was the inventor of several useful appliances. In his declining years he was frequently in a reminiscent mood, and his vivid recollections of local incidents, together with personal anccodotes of people of a past generation furnished the material for many interesting articles in the Lancaster Courant.
    The late Mr. Wilder left one son, Clifton W., who was born in Leominster, October 6, 1876. He acquired his early education in the Leominster public schools including the high school, was graduated from the mechanical engineering department of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is now following his profession in Brooklyn, New York.
  • In Apr 1902 Ella Martina Pitts received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Cornelius's service; and received certificate number 645927.
  • From the History of Shirley, Massachusetts --
    He enlisted, July 12, 1861, at Camp Scott in Worcester, as private in Company A, 15th Massachusetts Infantry, serving three years, never being absent on account of sickness, being in 31 battles and skirmishes. He was urged several times to take an officer's position but preferred that of a private; was taken prisoner at Petersburg, remaining in Libby prison from June 24 to July 8, when he was released and sent home with his Company. Mr. Wilder was a piano maker in Leominster, but his long service in the Civil war told upon his health. He d. in Leominster, Mar. 14, 1902. Mrs. Wilder is a dealer in dry goods and small wares, in Leominster.
  • On 19 May 1909 Cornelius and Ella's son, Clifton White Wilder married Caroline Augusta Wischer at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.
  • Cornelius's wife, Ella Martina Pitts, died and was buried in Oct 1928 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with her husband n Section 13, Lot 37 at age 81 years and 10 months.
  • Last Edited: 22 Jul 2016

Family: Ella Martina Pitts b. 12 Nov 1846, d. 19 Oct 1928

  • Clifton White Wilder b. 6 Oct 1876, d. 15 Aug 1954

Edwin Lincoln Wilder

b. July 1842, d. 20 May 1922
  • Father: Erasmus Darwin Wilder b. 29 May 1811, d. 18 May 1870
  • Mother: Avilla Lincoln b. 28 Dec 1802, d. 10 Feb 1879
  • Company: A
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder was born in Jul 1842 at Massachusetts, son of Erasmus Darwin Wilder and Avilla Lincoln.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder was born on 10 Jul 1844 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Erasmus Darwin Wilder and Avilla Lincoln.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder was enumerated in the household of Erasmus Darwin Wilder and Avilla Lincoln in the 1850 US Federal Census on 4 Sep 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Erasmus D. Wilder, 39, m, $1300, b. Leominster, MA
    Arvilla Wilder, 48, f, b. Jeffrey, NH
    **Cornelius E. Wilder, 12, m, b. Leominster, MA
    **Edwin L. Wilder, 8, b. Leominster, MA
    Albert A. Wilder, 6, b. Leominster, MA
    Otis Wilder, 4, b. Leominster, MA.
  • In 1861 Edwin was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Edwin gave his occupation as comb maker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Edwin mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years old.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder and Cornelius Erasmus Wilder, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • About 1862 Edwin was promoted to Corporal. Ford's history notes that he "voluntarily gave up his warrant."
  • Starting 8 Sep 1862, Albert A. Wilder, his brother, served in the 20th Connecticut Infantry, mustering out on 13 Jun 1865 at Fort Lincoln, Washington, DC.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Edwin ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • On 7 Nov 1867 Edwin Lincoln Wilder, 25, married Mary Jane Tisdale, 20, daughter of Seth Haskins Tisdale and Lucinda Coolidge, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder and Mary Jane Tisdale were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 27 Jun 1889 Edwin and Mary's daughter, Mary Arvilla Wilder married Jacob V. Cook at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A.
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in Aug 1890, and received certificate number 616514.
  • He and Mary Jane Tisdale were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1900 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he works with combs. They live in a mortgaged home. Of their 9 children, seven are still living.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder, a member of Charles H. Stevens post, G. A. R., was a pall bearer at the burial of Francis Edwin Colburn in Apr 1901 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 Edwin and Mary's daughter, Carrie Ann Wilder married George Clifford Caswell at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 Edwin and Mary's daughter, Gracie Lucinda Wilder married Alton Charles Oakes at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1906 Edwin was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Oct 1906 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edwin Lincoln Wilder attended the 40th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 75 other veterans of the regiment. (Report believed to be from the Worcester Spy.)
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder was also mentioned in attendance in the Fitchburg Sentinel coverage of the 1906 reunion.
  • On 21 Oct 1907 at Grand Army Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts, Edwin Lincoln Wilder attended the 41st annual regimental reunion and banquet on the 46th anniversary of the Battle of Ball's Bluff, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel the following day.
  • On 22 Jun 1910 Edwin and Mary's daughter, Lena Estella Wilder married Ernest R. Andrews at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 27 Oct 1910 at The State Mutual Building, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edwin Lincoln Wilder attended the 44th reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • He and Mary Jane Tisdale were enumerated in the 1920 US Federal Census on 10 Jan 1920 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Edwin Lincoln Wilder died on 20 May 1922 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 79 years and 10 months old.
  • He was buried in May 1922 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Section 5, Lot 51.
  • On 5 Jun 1922 Mary Jane Tisdale received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Edwin's service; his wife, received certificate number 920829.
  • Mary, his wife, outlived Edwin and died on 16 May 1931 at age 83.
  • Last Edited: 22 Jul 2016

Family: Mary Jane Tisdale b. 15 Oct 1847, d. 16 May 1931

  • Mary Arvilla Wilder b. 21 Feb 1868, d. 10 Apr 1953
  • Franklin A. Wilder b. Sep 1870, d. 24 Apr 1934
  • Chrissie Wilder b. Feb 1874, d. 14 Dec 1961
  • Carrie Ann Wilder b. Feb 1874, d. 26 Aug 1974
  • Fanny Lucinda Wilder b. 19 Sep 1876, d. 16 Jun 1879
  • Gracie Lucinda Wilder b. 13 Feb 1880, d. 11 May 1958
  • Victoria L. Wilder b. Apr 1882, d. 16 Dec 1960
  • Lena Estella Wilder b. Jul 1884, d. 14 Mar 1970

Ezra K. Wilder

b. 19 April 1842, d. 11 November 1893
  • Father: Merrick Wilder b. 18 Jul 1803, d. 20 Jul 1883
  • Mother: Catherine Day b. between 1808 - 1809
  • Company: A
  • Ezra K. Wilder was born on 19 Apr 1842 at Stow, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Merrick Wilder and Catherine Day, according to White Genealogy, not Leominster as per Ford.
  • Ezra K. Wilder was enumerated in the household of Merrick Wilder and Catherine Day in the 1850 US Federal Census on 9 Sep 1850 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where Merrick WILDER works as a butcher.
  • In 1861 Ezra was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Ezra mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years, 2 months and 23 days old.
  • On 1 Aug 1861 Ezra ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Ezra gave his occupation as chair maker.
  • In 1862 Ezra was living at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting 6 Sep 1862, Ezra also served in the 53rd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Militia), Company K.
  • He ended his service on 2 Sep 1863.
  • On 23 Nov 1864 Ezra K. Wilder, 22, married Aline Annette Whitcomb, 20, daughter of James Whitcomb and Fidelia Brown, at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Ezra K. Wilder and Aline Annette Whitcomb were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Ezra K. Wilder, 38, works in factory, b. MA (as were all)
    Aline A., 35
    Eveline A., 14
    Harry C., 9.
  • On 1 Feb 1888 Ezra and Aline's daughter, Evelyn A. Wilder married Herbert A. Morse at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Ezra K. Wilder died on 11 Nov 1893 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 51 years, 6 months and 23 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1893 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Section 5, Lot 2.
  • On 3 Feb 1894 Aline Annette Whitcomb received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Ezra's service; his wife, received certificate number 396259, for his service in the 53rd MA Regiment.
  • Aline, his wife, outlived Ezra and died on 28 Apr 1925 at age 80.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Aline Annette Whitcomb b. 3 Nov 1844, d. 28 Apr 1925

  • Evelyn A. Wilder b. 19 Dec 1864
  • Isabelle Wilder d. before 1880
  • Harry C. Wilder b. 15 May 1870

George E. Wilder

b. 17 June 1842, d. 16 May 1864

George E. Wilder
  • Father: George Wilder b. 1807, d. 1 Feb 1871
  • Mother: Mary S. Low b. 18 Oct 1813, d. 16 Jul 1897
  • Company: A
  • George E. Wilder was born on 17 Jun 1842 at Petersham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of George Wilder and Mary S. Low.
  • George E. Wilder was enumerated in the household of George Wilder and Mary S. Low in the 1850 US Federal Census on 30 Aug 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George Wilder, 43, blacksmith, b. Petersham
    Mary, 35, b. Leominster
    **George E., 8, b. Petersham
    James A., 5, b. Petersham
    Jennie L., 0, b. Leominster
    Andrew May, 23, blacksmith, b. Ireland
    Mary Mcmaunice, 23, b. Ireland.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, George gave his occupation as clerk.
  • In 1861 George was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years and 25 days old.
  • On 12 Nov 1862 George was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 13 Dec 1862 George was wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in the side.
  • On 1 Jan 1864 George was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 11 May 1864 George was wounded at Spotsylvania, Virginia, shot in the head.
  • He died on 16 May 1864 due to wounds. He was 21 years, 10 months and 29 days old.
  • On 24 Dec 1869 George's sister, Jenny Low Wilder, married Dwight N. Jackson at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 1 Feb 1871 his father, George Wilder, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption.
  • On 5 May 1875 George's sister, Jenny Low Wilder, married Albert W. Allen at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Nov 1877 his sister, Jenny Low Wilder, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 27 of consumption.
  • On 16 Jul 1883 Mary S. Low received a pension to surviving family member based on George's service; his mother, made application number 306679, but no certificate number is recorded.
  • In 1888, George was included on p. 98 of the Civil War section of Emerson's "Leominster Historical" as follows:
    "Sgt. George E. Wilder, son of George Wilder, was shot in the head at the battle near Spottsylvania, and died May 17th, 1864."
  • Credits: Portrait from "Leominster: Historical and Picturesque", by William A. Emerson, 1888.
  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2012