William Henry Trowbridge

b. 4 January 1836, d. 3 January 1913
  • Father: George Trowbridge b. 11 Aug 1796, d. 23 Sep 1888
  • Mother: Juliana Allin b. 20 May 1805, d. 24 Mar 1892
  • Company: K
  • William Henry Trowbridge was born on 4 Jan 1836 at Camden, Oneida County, New York, son of George Trowbridge and Juliana Allin.
  • In 1861 William was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as painter.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 5 months and 27 days old.
  • William Henry Trowbridge and Charles Avery Trowbridge, the 4th cousins, descendants of Thomas TROWBRIDGE, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to expiration of term of service.

  • He was enumerated in the household of George Trowbridge and Juliana Allin in the 1880 US Federal Census on on 4 Jun 1880 at at Camden, Oneida County, New York, as:
    Trowbridge, George, 82, farmer, b. CT
    ---, Juliana, 70, wife, b. RI
    ---, W. Henry, 41, son, single, unemployed, b. NY.
  • On 23 Sep 1888 his father, George Trowbridge, died at Camden, Oneida County, New York, at age 92.
  • On 24 Mar 1892 his mother, Juliana Allin, died at Camden, Oneida County, New York, at age 86.
  • From the Trowbridge Genealogy --
    "...as a young man he engaged in farming. Early in the Civil War he entered the army. He enlisted at Northbridge, Mass., July 1, 1861, for three years in Company K, 15th Massachusetts Infantry. He was in the battles of Balls Bluff and Chickamauga. He was discharged July 28, 1864, at the expiration of his time of service.
    He is blind from disease contracted in the army and resides with his youngest sister on the homestead in Camden. He is unmarried.
  • William Henry Trowbridge died on 3 Jan 1913 at Camden, Oneida County, New York, unmarried. He was 76 years, 11 months and 30 days old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1913 at Forest Park Cemetery, Camden, Oneida County, New York, Sect. 9 Lot 7, with his parents.
  • Last Edited: 27 Apr 2016

Cyrenius Eugene Tucker

b. between 1837 and 1838, d. 27 November 1925
  • Father: Royal Tucker b. 17 Apr 1794, d. 15 Aug 1869
  • Mother: Susan M. Bullock d. before 1840
  • Company: K
  • Cyrenius Eugene Tucker was also known as Charles E. Tucker in the MASSCW.
  • He was born between 1837 - 1838 at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Royal Tucker and Susan M. Bullock.
  • Cyrenius Eugene Tucker was enumerated in the household of Royal Tucker in the 1860 US Federal Census on 27 Jul 1860 at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Royal Tucker, 60, blacksmith, b. MA
    Cyrenas, 22, farm labor, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Cyrenius gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Cyrenius was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 Cyrenius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a wagoner, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 2 Feb 1863, and received certificate number 165092.
  • On 23 Feb 1863 Cyrenius ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia, due to disability having been injured in both legs.

  • On 15 Aug 1869 his father, Royal Tucker, died at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 75.
  • On 16 Oct 1871 Cyrenius Eugene Tucker married Phebe Joslin, 35, daughter of Alfred Joslin and Nancy [--?--], at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Cyrenius Eugene Tucker and Phebe Joslin were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 7 Jun 1880 at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Tucker, Cyrenus E., 45, carpenter, b. MA
    ---, Phebe, 44, wife, b. MA
    and six boarders.
  • Cyrenius's wife, Phebe Joslin, died and was buried in May 1895 at Oak Hill Cemetery, Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island, Plot: C 0011 at age 58 years and 11 months.
  • Cyrenius Eugene Tucker died on 27 Nov 1925 at Valley Falls, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • He was buried in Nov 1925 at Oak Grove Cemetery, Pawtucket, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Last Edited: 25 Oct 2016

Family: Phebe Joslin b. 30 May 1836, d. 8 May 1895

George Francis Tucker

b. 17 April 1818, d. 5 January 1891
  • Father: Calvin Tucker b. 15 Mar 1780, d. 21 Apr 1858
  • Mother: Serrepta Gilbert b. 2 Oct 1783, d. 21 Jan 1839
  • Company: F
  • George Francis Tucker was born on 17 Apr 1818 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Calvin Tucker and Serrepta Gilbert, grandson of Ephraim and Mehitable (Chandler) Tucker.
  • On 21 Jan 1839 his mother, Serrepta Gilbert, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 55.
  • On 7 Oct 1841 George Francis Tucker, 23, married Mary Robinson, 19, daughter of William Robinson and Julia [--?--], at Dutch Reformed Church, Montgomery, Orange County, New York.
  • George Francis Tucker and Mary Robinson were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 29 Aug 1850 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George F. Tucker, 32, shoe maker, b. MA
    Mary, 27, b. NY
    Emory H., 8, b. MA
    Mary E., 4, b. MA
    Calvin Tucker, 70, blacksmith, b. MA
    Abner W. Moulton, 25, shoe maker, b. OH.
  • George Francis Tucker and Mary Robinson were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 19 Jun 1860 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George F Tucker, 42, boot crimper, b. MA
    Mary, 37, b. NY
    Emory H., 18, shoe finisher, b. MA (as were all the children)
    Mary E., 14
    Emma J., 9
    George A., 6.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, George gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 43 years, 2 months and 25 days old.
  • On 30 Oct 1862 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 6 Nov 1862, and received certificate number 77898.
  • Starting 11 Jul 1864, Emory Healy Tucker, his son, served in the 42nd Massachusetts Infantry (Militia) as a Private.
  • Starting 20 Sep 1864, George also served in the 10th Veterans Reserve Corps.
  • He ended his service with the 10th VRC, Company K by mustering out on 14 Nov 1865.
  • On 6 Oct 1868 George and Mary's daughter, Jennie E. Tucker married Thomas Hall at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 21 Sep 1883, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, George was admitted.
  • In 1886 George was living at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1886 George was living at Togus, Kennebec County, Maine.
  • In 1886 George Francis Tucker was included in the Civil War memorial publication at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 31 Mar 1886 George and Mary's son, George Arthur Tucker married Luella E. Holmes at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • George Francis Tucker was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. F.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company F, apparently enumerated twice.
  • He died on 5 Jan 1891 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, while on furlough from the Soldiers' Home. He was 72 years, 8 months and 19 days old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1891 at North Brookfield Cemetery, North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Feb 1891 Mary Robinson received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on George's service; and received certificate number 342738.
  • Mary, his wife, outlived George and died on 1 Jul 1894 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 72.
  • Last Edited: 31 Aug 2012

Family: Mary Robinson b. 14 Apr 1822, d. 1 Jul 1894

  • Emory Healy Tucker b. 7 May 1842, d. 29 Jul 1907
  • Mary Ellen Tucker b. 1844
  • Mary Ellen Tucker b. 16 Jun 1846, d. 16 Jan 1919
  • Jennie E. Tucker b. 13 Jul 1851, d. 1 Feb 1914
  • George Arthur Tucker b. 18 Mar 1854, d. 7 Mar 1907

Morris Dwight Tucker

b. November 1838, d. 18 December 1909
  • Father: Francis Eugene Tucker b. 25 Nov 1799
  • Mother: Docia Ann Bealls b. 1811, d. 25 Dec 1844
  • Company: I
  • Morris Dwight Tucker was born in Nov 1838 at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, son of Francis Eugene Tucker and Docia Ann Bealls.
  • On 25 Dec 1844 his mother, Docia Ann Bealls, died at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts.
  • Morris Dwight Tucker was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 27 Jun 1860 at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    Dwight M. Tucker, 22, farm laborer, b. MA
    Francis E. Tucker, 56, farm labor, b. MA (his father)
    living at the farm of
    Benjamin Ford, 41, farmer, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Morris gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Morris was living at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts.

  • On 15 Oct 1861 Morris mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years and 11 months old.
  • On 4 Jul 1863 Morris was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, in the hip.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Morris Dwight Tucker was reported as wounded at Gettysburg.
  • On 14 Oct 1863 Morris was wounded at Bristoe Station, Virginia.
  • On 21 Oct 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Morris Dwight Tucker was mentioned in the official casualty list (Volume 92 # 42):
    The Fifteenth Regiment
    Headquarters Fifteenth Regiment
    Oct. 1863
    Mr. Baldwin: Dear Sir;---The following is an official list of the killed and wounded in the 15th Massachusetts volunteers, in the engagement at Bristow Station, Va. Oct. 13, 1863
    Killed--- Corp, Samuel Stearns, Co. B., private A. E. Hinckley, Co. I.
    ]Wounded--- Lieut. Chas. H. Stevens; privates F. Merrifield, J. Frederick, Co. D; H. Jeverson, Co. E; Serg. G. A. Davis, Co. F. (since dead) privates D. Sherwood, Thomas Say, M. D. Tucker, Co. I; Adam Peacock, Co. K.
    Very Respectfully
    Your obedient servant,
    Geo. C. Joslin
    Lieut. Col. commanding Regiment.
  • On 15 May 1864 Morris was wounded as a Corporal.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Morris Dwight Tucker was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 22 Jul 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Morris Dwight Tucker was mentioned among the wounded.
  • On 7 Jan 1865 Morris ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Washington, DC, due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 12 Jan 1865, and received certificate number 42257.
  • On 8 Jan 1868 Morris Dwight Tucker, 29, married Sarah Medbury, 25, daughter of Andrew B. Medbury and Mary Hannah Congdon.
  • Morris Dwight Tucker and Sarah Medbury were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 27 Jun 1870 at Wilmington, Windham County, Vermont, as:
    Tucker, M. D., 31, laborer, b. MA
    ---, Sarah, 27, b. MA
    Segur, Martha, 64, b. CT
    nextdoor to his father-in-law, A. B. Medbury, 58, b. CT.
  • Morris Dwight Tucker and Sarah Medbury were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 1 Jun 1880 at Linden, Union County, New Jersey, as:
    Tucker, Morris D., 39, watchman, b. MA (as were his parents)
    ---, Sarah, 36, wife, b. MA
    ---, Flora P., 7, dau, b. VT.
  • On 3 Apr 1889 Sarah Medbury, his wife, died at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, at age 46.
  • Morris Dwight Tucker was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1900 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, as:
    Tucker, Morris D., 61, widower, b. VT, ticket clerk
    ---, Flora B., dau, 27, single, b. VT, assistant ticket clerk
    Adam, Lizzie E., housekeeper, b. PA.
  • On 21 Oct 1907 Morris Dwight Tucker wrote a letter to be read at the regimental reunion and banquet on the 46th anniversary of the Battle of Ball's Bluff, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel the following day.
  • He died on 18 Dec 1909 at Vineland, Cumberland County, New Jersey, of stomach cancer. He was 71 years and 1 month old.
  • He was buried on 22 Dec 1909 at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
  • On 27 Oct 1910 Morris D. Tucker was reported as deceased at the 44th regimental reunion.
  • Last Edited: 1 Aug 2012

Family: Sarah Medbury b. 4 Nov 1842, d. 3 Apr 1889

  • Flora Bell Tucker b. 26 Sep 1872

William Andrew Tucker

b. 21 January 1840, d. 27 April 1864
  • Father: Andrew Tucker Jr. b. 26 Jan 1813, d. 27 Mar 1896
  • Mother: Harriet [--?--] b. between 1813 - 1814
  • Company: K
  • William Andrew Tucker was born on 21 Jan 1840 at Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Andrew Tucker Jr. and Harriet [--?--].
  • His mother, Harriet [--?--], died apparently.
  • On 23 Jan 1847 William's widowed father, Andrew Tucker Jr., remarried to Asia Ann Shippee at Thompson, Windham County, Connecticut.
  • William Andrew Tucker was enumerated in the household of Andrew Tucker Jr. and Asia Ann Shippee in the 1850 US Federal Census on 19 Aug 1850 at Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Andrew Tucker, 36, mule spinner, b. MA
    Asha A., 36, (f), b. RI
    **William A., 11, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • In 1861 William was living at Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years, 5 months and 10 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 2 Dec 1863 on retreat from Mine Run, Virginia.
  • He died on 27 Apr 1864 at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, of wounds, according to the 1870 roster; or of disease, according to the MASSCW. He was 24 years, 3 months and 6 days old.
  • He was buried at Blackstone Cemetery, Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Andrew Tucker was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 27 Oct 1869 Andrew Tucker Jr. received a pension to surviving family member based on William's service; his father, received certificate number 150520.
  • Last Edited: 13 Apr 2016

Anthony Fisher Tufts

b. 17 July 1844, d. 16 September 1922
  • Father: Caleb Washburn Tufts b. 1806, d. 1872
  • Mother: Beriah Alvord b. 13 Jul 1807, d. 22 Aug 1865
  • Company: F
  • Anthony Fisher Tufts was born on 17 Jul 1844 at West Hampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, son of Caleb Washburn Tufts and Beriah Alvord.
  • Anthony Fisher Tufts was enumerated in the household of Caleb Washburn Tufts and Beriah Alvord in the 1850 US Federal Census in Aug 1850 at Westhampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    Caleb W. Tufts, 42, farmer, b. MA (as were all in family)
    Beriah, 41
    Wm. H., 11
    Franklin, 9
    **Anthony, 6
    Catherine D., 16
    Genye H., 18, (m), farmer.
  • Anthony Fisher Tufts was enumerated in the household of Caleb Washburn Tufts and Beriah Alvord in the 1860 US Federal Census in Jul 1860 at Westhampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    Caleb Tufts, 43, farmer, b. MA (as were all in household)
    Beniah, 52 (f)
    William, 32, farm hand
    Emily, 22
    Franklin, 19
    **Anthony, 16, farm labor
    Eldridge, 13
    Charles King, 30, farmer
    Elmira, 33
    Abbie, 3
    Burman Lesle, 8 (m.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Anthony gave his occupation as yeoman.
  • On 21 Jan 1862 at Westhampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Caleb Franklin Tufts his brother, enlisted in the 31st Massachusetts Infantry, Co. H, being discharged on 18 June 1862 in Kenner, LA.

  • On 30 Jan 1862 Anthony mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of West Hampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. He was 17 years, 6 months and 13 days old.
  • On 19 Mar 1863 Anthony ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia, due to disability.

  • Starting 30 Nov 1863, Anthony also served in the 37th Massachusetts, Company H.
  • On 18 Dec 1863 at Williamsburg, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Caleb Franklin Tufts and Anthony Fisher Tufts, his brother, re-enlisted in the 27th Massachusetts Infantry, was held from May to Dec 1864 at Andersonville, and eventually mustered out on 26 June 1865.
  • On 2 Apr 1865 Anthony was wounded at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia.
  • He ended his service with the 37th Massachusetts Infantry by mustering out on 21 Jun 1865 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 18 Sep 1865, and received certificate number 104781.
  • In 1878 Anthony Fisher Tufts was described as 5' 8", with light complexion, gray eyes and brown hair, a married man.
  • On 18 Aug 1878, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, Anthony was admitted.
  • On 16 Sep 1878, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, Anthony was discharged at his own request.
  • On 18 Dec 1878 Anthony Fisher Tufts, 34, married Sarah B. Rutter, 36, at Cuyahoga County, Ohio.
  • Anthony Fisher Tufts was enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 14 Jun 1880 at Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, as:
    Anthony Tufts, 34, cabinet maker, b. MA
    Sarah, 36, b. OH (of PA parents.)
  • On 16 Sep 1890, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, Anthony was re-admitted.
  • He and Sarah B. Rutter were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 11 Jun 1900 at Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, as:
    Tufts, Anthony F., head, b. July 1844, married 19 years, b. MA (fat b. NH, mor b. MA), carpenter
    ---, Sarah B., wife, b. Sep 1842, she has no children, b. OH.
  • Anthony Fisher Tufts died on 16 Sep 1922 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine. He was 78 years, 1 month and 30 days old.
  • He was buried in Sep 1922 at Togus National Cemetery, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, Section K, Row 10, Site 3904.
  • On 11 Jun 1926 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine, his personal effects were sold for $6.35.
  • He and Sarah B. Rutter had no issue.
  • Last Edited: 2 Aug 2012

Family: Sarah B. Rutter b. Sep 1842, d. before 1922

John Tully

b. 3 January 1839, d. 23 July 1888
  • Father: Andrew Tully
  • Mother: Ann McCabe
  • Company: E
  • John Tully was born on 3 Jan 1839 at County Meath, Ireland, son of Andrew Tully and Ann McCabe.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, John gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 22 years, 6 months and 9 days old.
  • On 23 Mar 1863 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts for disability due to Chronic Diarrhea.

  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Tully was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension in Jun 1863, and received certificate no. 20160.
  • On 5 Jun 1868 John Tully, 29, married Catherine Tully, daughter of Michael Tully and Mary [--?--], at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, his cousin.
  • John Tully and Catherine Tully were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 26 Aug 1870 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he works in a shoeshop, and their first child is six months old.
  • In 1879 John was living at Pond Street, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Tully was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Catherine Tully were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Tully, John, 42, cobbler, b. Ireland
    ---, Catherine , 39, wife, b. Ireland
    ---, Mary 10, dau b. MA
    ---, Lilly, 7, dau b. MA
    ---, Andrew, 4, son b. MA
    ---, John, 1, son b. MA.
  • On 26 Mar 1886 Catherine Tully, his wife, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption.
  • John Tully died on 23 Jul 1888 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption. He was 49 years, 6 months and 20 days old.
  • He was buried in Jul 1888 at Saint Johns Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 12 Sep 1891 Michael Eagon made application at Massachusetts for a pension as guardian to John's surviving dependants, and received certificate number 988495.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Catherine Tully b. 1845, d. 26 Mar 1886

  • Mary Agnes Tully b. 18 Feb 1870, d. 14 May 1913
  • Ann Tully b. 19 Nov 1871, d. 8 Dec 1871
  • James Andrew Tully b. 1 Jan 1873, d. 3 Jan 1873
  • Lillian Tully b. 3 Jan 1874
  • Andrew F. Tully b. 9 May 1876, d. 3 Nov 1946
  • John Tully b. 5 Mar 1879

Luther Gray Turner

b. 12 July 1837, d. 1 November 1861
  • Father: Luther G. Turner d. 1844
  • Mother: Harriet Waters b. 6 Jun 1804
  • Company: C
  • Luther Gray Turner was born on 12 Jul 1837 at Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Luther G. Turner and Harriet Waters.
  • Luther Gray Turner was enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 19 Aug 1850 at Harvard, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Richard Whitney, 66, farmer, b. MA (
    as were all in the family
    )
    Sally, 63
    Abby Willard, 14
    James L. Whitney, 33, farmer
    Elizabeth, 31
    **Luther Turner, 12
    Mary Lewis, 0
    (Relationships if any unknown.)
  • He was enumerated in the household of Stephen S. Turner and Betsey Carter in the 1860 US Federal Census on 17 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Stephen S. Turner, 44, blacksmith, $4000 property, $1000 personal estate, b. MA (as were all in the family) (He is believed to be the uncle of Luther.)
    Betsey T., 42
    Walter S., 17
    Sarah E., 12
    George M., 10
    Nathan H., 7
    Freddie C., 1
    Mary Kelly, 18, servant, b. Ireland
    **Luthar G. Turner, 22, $250 personal estate, b. MA
    nextdoor:
    Caroline Turner, 57, $900 real estate, b. NH.
  • In 1861 Luther was living at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Luther gave his occupation as blacksmith.
  • On 24 Jun 1861 Luther Gray Turner, 23, married Isabel Cooly at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Luther mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 24 years old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Luther was wounded at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, in the right arm.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luther Gray Turner was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • He died on 1 Nov 1861 at Poolesville, Maryland, of wounds. He was 24 years, 3 months and 20 days old.
  • He was buried on 1 Nov 1861 at Poolesville Cemetery, Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luther Gray Turner was mentioned as follows:
    Returned Soldiers of the Fifteenth Regiment
    Five privates of Co.C, fifteenth regiment belonging in Clinton named Briggs M. Daboil, Samuel L. Smith, Matthew Greelman, Frank Grachein, and Henry Kinney, the first three wounded in the Balls Bluff fight, and the last two sick from the hospital at Poolesville, arrived in Worcester by the express train from New York, Sunday forenoon. They left Poolesville on Friday morning. The men were in charge of Lieut. A. L. Fuller, and were taken to Clinton by private conveyance from this city. Governor Andrew received a dispatch Saturday, from his aide, Col. Henry Lee Jr. at Poolesville, stating that Private Turner of Clinton died of his wounds after the battle.
  • In 1861 at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, an "administration" of his estate took place.
  • On 21 Jan 1863 Isabel Cooly received a pension to surviving family member based on Luther's service; and received certificate number 4305.
  • In 1868 Luther Gray Turner was included on the Civil War memorial at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, on the tablets at Lancaster Town Library.
  • In 1879, Luther was mentioned in Marvin's history of Lancaster.
  • He and Isabel Cooly had no issue.
  • Last Edited: 27 Apr 2016

Family: Isabel Cooly b. between 1840 - 1841

Benjamin Franklin Underwood

b. 6 July 1839, d. 10 November 1914
  • Father: Raymond Champion Underwood b. 1812, d. 25 Jul 1868
  • Mother: Harriet E. Booth b. 1 Sep 1819, d. 27 Mar 1906
  • Company: H
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood was born on 6 Jul 1839 at New York City, New York, son of Raymond Champion Underwood and Harriet E. Booth.
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood was enumerated in the household of Raymond Champion Underwood and Harriet E. Booth in the 1850 US Federal Census in Jun 1850 at Waterford, New London County, Connecticut, as:
    Raymond Underwood, 37, stone cutter, b. RI
    Harriet, 30, b. NY
    William, 13, b. NY
    **Benjn F., 10, b. NY
    James H., 8, b. NY
    Edwin D., 5, b. CT
    Harriet N., 3, b. CT.
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood was enumerated in the household of Raymond Champion Underwood and Harriet E. Booth in the 1860 US Federal Census in Jul 1860 at Branford, New Haven County, Connecticut, as:
    Raymund Underwood, 48, stone cutter, b. RI
    Harriet, 40, dress maker, b. NY
    Wm., 23, stone cutter, b. NY
    **Benjamin, 21, stone cutter, b. NY
    James, 18, stone cutter, b. NY
    Edwin, 15, b. CT
    Harriet, 13, b. CT
    Sarah, 8, b. CT
    Orien, 3, b. RI.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Benjamin gave his occupation as stone-cutter.
  • In 1861 Benjamin was living at Stony Creek, Connecticut.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Benjamin mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 22 years and 6 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Benjamin was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin Underwood was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, B. F. Underwood was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin Underwood was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • In 1862, Benjamin was paroled from prison.
  • On 10 Jun 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Benjamin Franklin Underwood was listed among the released prisoners brought to this port (Annapolis?) on board the U. S. transport Guide from Newbern, N. C.
  • On 6 Sep 1862 Benjamin Franklin Underwood, 23, married Sarah A. Francis, 24, daughter of William Francis and Agnes Carbanes, at Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts.
  • On 4 Oct 1862 Benjamin ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • Starting 16 Dec 1862, Benjamin also served in the 5th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, Company H.
  • On 4 Mar 1863 Benjamin was promoted to Corporal of Company K.
  • On 24 Aug 1863 Benjamin was promoted to Sergeant of Company A.
  • On 5 Dec 1864 Benjamin was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 27 Jan 1865 Benjamin was promoted to 1st Lieutenant of Company H.
  • On 11 Feb 1865 Benjamin was promoted to Adjutant.
  • He ended his service with the 5th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery on 26 Jun 1865 at New Berne, North Carolina.
  • He was enumerated in the household of William Francis and Agnes Carbanes in the 1880 US Federal Census on in 1880 at at Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts, as:
    Wm Francis, 73, England
    Agnes Francis, Wife, 71, Scotland
    B F Underwood, Son-in-law, 41, New York, United States
    Sarah Underwood, Daughter, 41, England.
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood and Sarah A. Francis were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1900 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois, where he is an editor, and they live as lodgers in the house of Louisa SPALDING, b. Illinois. They have never had children.
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood made application at Illinois for a veteran's pension on 3 Jun 1901, and received certificate number 1033017.
  • He and Sarah A. Francis were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census in 1910 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois, where he is a newspaper editor.
  • On 16 Mar 1911 Sarah A. Francis, his wife, died at age 73.
  • "B. F. Underwood of Quincy, Ill., has been visiting in West Springfield. He was the guest of William Fowler of 39 East School street. He also called upon his niece, Miss Ora Batchelder of Harvard street, Springfield, who is a teacher in the Jefferson avenue school. Mr. Underwood is an editor of one of the Quincy papers and came on to the reunion of the 15th Massachusetts regiment veterans in Worcester the 21st, the anniversary of the battle of Ball's Bluff, where he was wounded and taken prisoner of war." (Springfield Republican 26 Oct 1911.)
  • Benjamin Franklin Underwood died on 10 Nov 1914 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois. He was 75 years, 4 months and 4 days old.
  • Last Edited: 29 May 2017

Family: Sarah A. Francis b. Jan 1838, d. 16 Mar 1911

Charles Worthington Upham

b. 9 September 1842, d. 14 December 1861
  • Father: Joel Worthington Upham b. 25 Oct 1803, d. 10 Aug 1879
  • Mother: Lydia Wheeler b. 3 Jan 1807, d. 26 Nov 1887
  • Company: D
  • Charles Worthington Upham was born on 9 Sep 1842 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Joel Worthington Upham and Lydia Wheeler.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Charles gave his occupation as clerk.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 18 years, 10 months and 3 days old.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Worthington Upham was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Worthington Upham was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles W. Upham was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • He died on 14 Dec 1861 at Libby Prison, Richmond, Richmond County, Virginia. He was 19 years, 3 months and 5 days old.
  • He was buried at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where there is a family memorial. His actual burial place is unknown.
  • On 15 Jul 1874 Charles Worthington Upham was included on the Civil War memorial at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Charles's father, Joel Worthington Upham, died and was buried in Aug 1879 at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 75 years and 9 months.
  • Charles was included in Marvin's "History of Worcester in the War of Rebellion", as follows:
    This youthful soldier, son of Dea. Joel W. Upham, enlisted in the Fifteenth Regiment, and was in the fierce encounter at Ball's Bluff. He was among the prisoners, and was taken to Richmond, where he learned in prison that the 'tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.'
    His death occurred on the fourteenth of December, 1861, after about six weeks of confinement and privation. As a son he was tenderly beloved by his parents; as a soldier he was faithful and brave. He left home a private, but was a corporal at the time of the battle, having been found worthy of promotion.
    At the time of his decease, his age was nineteen years, three months and five days.
    Ernest but unavailing efforts were made to find his remains, that they might rest with those of his kindred. Though his unknown grave is among strangers, his memory is sacred in the hearts of his friends.
  • Charles's mother, Lydia Wheeler, died and was buried in Nov 1887 at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 80 years and 9 months.
  • In an article in "Midwest Pioneer Railroads," about his brother, Henry Pratt Upham, it is noted,
    Charles, who served in the 15th Massachusetts Regiment, was captured by the Confederates at the Battle of Ball's Bluff, and died in Libby Prison in 1861.
  • A photograph or image of Charles Worthington Upham is located at The American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts, according to their website.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Austin Upton

b. 23 June 1825
  • Father: Capt. Eli Upton Jr. b. 1795
  • Mother: Matilda Parker b. 3 Jan 1799, d. 3 Aug 1876
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Austin Upton was born on 23 Jun 1825 at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Capt. Eli Upton Jr. and Matilda Parker.
  • Austin Upton was enumerated in the household of Matilda Parker in the 1860 US Federal Census on 10 Aug 1860 at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Matilda Upton, 61, b. MA
    **Austin, 34, shoe maker, b. MA
    Sylvia, 20, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Austin gave his occupation as Shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Austin was living at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 Austin Upton mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 36 years, 2 months and 10 days old.
  • Austin was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 16 Feb 1864 Austin reenlisted, having received a bounty of $325.
  • He died in service.
  • On 19 Feb 1872 Matilda Upton applied for a pension to surviving family member, based on Austin's service; his mother, but no certificate is recorded.
  • Last Edited: 30 Mar 2013

Richard A. Van Moll

b. 1840, d. 17 September 1862
  • Father: Augustine Cornelius Van Moll b. 1829
  • Mother: Hannah N. Broderick b. 1822
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Richard A. Van Moll was born in 1840 at Massachusetts, son of Augustine Cornelius Van Moll and Hannah N. Broderick.
  • Richard A. Van Moll was enumerated in the household of Augustine Cornelius Van Moll and Hannah N. Broderick in the 1850 US Federal Census in 1850 at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Augustine Donmall, 29, cabinet maker, b. France
    Hannah Donmall, 28
    **Augustine Donmall, 8
    George E Donmall, 6
    John H Donmall, 3
    Barbanna E Donmall, 4/12.
  • Richard A. Van Moll was enumerated in the household of Augustine Cornelius Van Moll and Hannah N. Broderick in the State census in 1855 at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Augustin C Vanmoll, 35, cabinet maker, b. France
    Hannah M., 34, b. St. John's
    **Richard A., 13, b. MA (as were all the children)
    George E., 9
    Barbara L., 6
    Francis A., 4
    Mary C., 2.
  • Richard A. Van Moll was enumerated in the household of Augustine Cornelius Van Moll and Hannah N. Broderick in the 1860 US Federal Census on 27 Jun 1860 at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    A. C. Vanmoll, 40, cabinetmaker, b. Antwerp
    Hannah N., 37, b. St. Johns
    **Richard A., 19, shoemaker, b. MA (as were all the children)
    Geo. E., 17, shoemaker
    John H., 14
    Barbara L., 10
    Frances H., 8 (f)
    Mary C., 6
    Wm. A., 4
    James F., 1.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Richard gave his occupation as Shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Richard was living at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting 15 Apr 1861, Richard also served in the 8th Massachusetts Infantry, Co. A.
  • He ended his service with the 8th Massachusetts on 1 Aug 1861 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 Richard A. Van Moll mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters, being credited to the quota of Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years old.
  • On 20 Dec 1861, at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts, John H. Van Moll, his brother, a glass blower, was enlisted in the 11th Massachusetts Infantry, Co. B; and mustered out 14 July 1865 in Camp Meigs, Readville, MA.
  • On 30 Dec 1861, at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts, Augustine Cornelius Van Moll, his father, a cabinet maker, was 11th Massachusetts Infantry, Co. D, and was discharged for disability on 13 June 1863.
  • On 13 Mar 1862 at "Salem Register", Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, Richard A. Van Moll was mentioned in an article about the bodyguard which returned the deceased General Lander to Salem for interment. He may have been included in a group photo believed to have been taken of the Sharpshooters selected to accompany General. The officer standing at the far left is Captain John "Jack" Saunders.
  • He died on 17 Sep 1862 at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, killed in action. He was 22 years old.
  • On 13 Mar 1863 Hannah N. Broderick received a pension to surviving family member based on Richard's service; his mother, received pension certificate number 10811.
  • In Apr 1863, Richard Augustine Van Moll, his youngest brother, was named for Richard A. Van Moll.
  • On 31 Dec 1864, George E. Van Moll, his brother, a farmer, was enlisted in the 1st Bn Massachusetts Cavalry, Co. as a Private; was eventually promoted to full lieutenant on 15 April 1865, and mustered out 30 June 1865.
  • Richard A. Van Moll's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Hannah N. Broderick in the 1870 US Federal Census on 28 Jul 1870 at Georgetown, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Hannah Van Moll, 49y
    William, 14y
    Frederick, 11y
    Richard, 7y.
  • On 28 Apr 1881 at "The Boston Journal", Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, printed an article about the service of all the Van Moll men -- Richard, his father and his brothers:

    Six Soldiers in One Family.
    The Newburyport Herald gives the interestint history of a family every male member of which became a soldier.

    Augustin C. Van Moll, a German, who came to Newburyport in 1838, is the head of the warrior brood. When the war of the rebellion broke out he had three sons -- Richard, aged 20, George, 18, and John, about 14.
    Mr. Moll enlisted in the Eleventh Massachusetts, Company B, and was in active service until discharged for physical disability. He then removed to New Orleans, where he died.
    Richard enlisted in Co. A of the Eighth, a three-months regiement, and then in Company I (Andrew's Sharpshooters) of Salem. He was in the first Bull Run Fight and in all engagements in which the regiment took part up to the battle of Antietam, when he was killed Sept. 17, 1862.

    George went out in Capt. Wescott's company from Newberyport, which was afterwards attached to the Forthieth (Mozart) Regiment of New York. In this regiment he served three years rising to the grade of First Lieutenant. After his time had expired he was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Third United States Cavalry, and assigned to duty on the Canadian frontier, doing duty at this station until the close of the war. In 1866 he enlisted as a sergeant in the Third United States Cavalry and was ordered to New Mexico.

    After he had served his three years' enlistment he retired from the service and settled down upon a farm in Colorado, but farming was not the life for him and he returned home. Shortly after his arrival he was appointed to take charge of a recruiting office in Boston, where he stayed some two years, but getting uneasy with so much leisure time upon his hands, he enlisted as a sergeant in the United States cavalry, and was ordered to Fort Clark, Tex. He was discharged in February, 1880 for disability and pensioned, and is now living in Little Rock, Ark.

    John, when he found that his father and two brothers had gone to war, wanted to go, and although not quite 15 years of age, he enlisted in the Eleventh Massachusetts Regiment as a drummer boy. He served three years, and then reenlisted in the same regiment.

    At the close of the war he ebnlisted in Co. A, Third U. S. Cavalry, and went to New Mexico. When his term was out he reenlisted in the same company and servied five years, during which he passed through every State and Territory west of the Mississippi. He was made first sergeant and given command of the company. In 1874, his enlistment expiring, John enrolled himself for five years more, and participated in the battle of the Rosebud.

    Dec. 14, 1878, he was accidentally shot by a comrade, while in camp, and instantly killed. The murderer was intoxicated at the time, nad was promptly lynched -- a just reward for taking the life of a brave soldier. Van Moll was but 30 years of age at the time of his death, and had seen nearly 16 years of activy duty as a soldier.
    William and Frederick enlisted in 1880, in the Thirteenth United States Infantry, and are in New Mexico. William has already been wounded once.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Corp'l Richard A. Van Moll was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, on the 35th anniversary of the battle. (Articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 20 Aug 2016

William E. Vannevar

b. 17 February 1819, d. 5 November 1862
  • Company: F
  • William E. Vannevar was born on 17 Feb 1819 at Bernardston, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • On 28 Apr 1847 William E. Vannevar, 28, married Fanny Maria Thompson, 27, daughter of Avery Thompson and Fanny Bartlett, at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • William E. Vannevar and Fanny Maria Thompson were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 11 Aug 1850 at Greenfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, where he is a carpenter. Also enumerated -- Adeline W. Thompson, 15, b. MA.
  • On 9 Apr 1860 Fanny Maria Thompson, his wife, died at New Braintree, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 40.
  • William E. Vannevar was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 15 Jun 1860 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William Vanevar, carpenter, 40, b. MA, and his son, Henry, 10, b. MA, who is in school. They have real estate in the value of $1500.
  • In 1862 William was living at West Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, William gave his occupation as carpenter.
  • In 1862 He was a widower at the time of his enlistment.

  • On 24 Feb 1862 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of West Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 43 years and 7 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 William was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, in chest and hand.
  • He died on 5 Nov 1862 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam. He was 43 years, 8 months and 19 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1862 in Brookfield Cemetery, at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1863, at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Henry Vannevar, his son, was involved in a guardianship proceeding at the probate court apparently to make provision for the orphan.
  • In Oct 1863 Dwight Hyde made application for a pension as guardian to William's surviving dependants, was named guardian, and received certificate number 27985.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 William E. Vaneaver was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 13 Apr 2016

Family: Fanny Maria Thompson b. 29 Feb 1820, d. 9 Apr 1860

  • William Henry Vannevar b. 9 Jun 1850, d. 11 May 1921

John P. Varrell

b. 18 March 1817, d. 18 December 1887
  • Father: Nathaniel Varrell b. 1795
  • Mother: Nancy [--?--] b. 1798
  • Company: 1_SS
  • John P. Varrell was born on 18 Mar 1817 at Ossipee, Carroll County, New Hampshire, son of Nathaniel Varrell and Nancy [--?--].
  • John P. Varrell married Marie Elizabeth Worth, daughter of Luther Worth and Sarah Smithkins.
  • John P. Varrell and Marie Elizabeth Worth were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 14 Jun 1860 at Rumney, Grafton County, New Hampshire, as:
    John P. Verrell, 43, clerk, b. ME
    Maria E., 32, b. NH (as were all the children)
    Cinderilla, 11
    Eudavilla, 8
    John J., 5
    Sarah M., 2
    Jonathan H. North, 25, farmer, b. NH.
  • At the time of his enlistment, John gave his occupation as Marble Worker.
  • In 1862 John was living at Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 25 Oct 1862 John P. Varrell mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 45 years, 7 months and 7 days old.
  • On 3 Jul 1863 John was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.
  • On 17 Aug 1863, at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, John was reported as returned to duty from hospital, but no later record is found.
  • On 11 Feb 1864 John ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by desertion, according to the 1870 AG report.

  • He and Marie Elizabeth Worth were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 19 Jul 1870 at Biddeford, York County, Maine, as:
    John P Verrill, 54, fisherman, b. NH
    Maria, 45, b. ME
    John, 15, b. ME
    Sarah, 12, b. ME
    Clara, 9, b. ME.
  • On 28 Sep 1871 John and Marie's daughter, Eudavilla Varrell married Solon William Dewey II at Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • John and Marie's daughter, Josephine E. Varrell married Alfred Wilkie.
  • John P. Varrell and Marie Elizabeth Worth were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 3 Jun 1880 at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Varrell, John P., 62, "at home", b. NH
    ---, Marie E., 52, wife, b. NH
    ---, Carrie M., 17, daur, single, works in factory, b. MA
    and three boarders.
  • John P. Varrell died on 18 Dec 1887 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 70 years and 9 months old.
  • An obituary for John P. Varrell was published on 19 Dec 1887 at "The Boston Herald", Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    "Death of John P. Varrell - Mr. John P. Varrell, a member of Anderson's (sic) sharpshooters attached to Col. Henry Wilson's 22d Massachusetts regiment during the late war, died at the residence of his son-in-law, Alfred Wilkie, the tenor, 74 Waltham street, at 1:10 yesterday morning. During the term of his military service Mr. Varrell received a shell wound in his left hip. After some months in hospital, he was discharged from the service; his wounds however, prevented his entering into active life again. His death was caused by a culmination of internal complaints, consequent upon his injuries. He was born in Ossipee, N. H., in March 1817, The funeral will take place at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday next at 74 Waltham street."
  • He was buried in Dec 1887 at Mount Feake Cemetery, Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Marie Elizabeth Worth was enumerated as the widow of John P. Varrell, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, noting that she cannot find the papers.
  • On 4 Apr 1893 John and Marie's daughter, Sarah Maria Varrell married Sumner Getchell at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • John P. Varrell's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Sumner Getchell and Sarah Maria Varrell in the 1910 US Federal Census on 21 Apr 1910 at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Summer Gitchell, 72, married 2nd for 17 years, b. ME, house carpenter
    Sarah, 51, wife, no children, b. NH
    Maria Varrell, 82, mor-in-law, four of six children living, b. NH
    Frank Moody, 39, lodger, single, b. NY.
  • John's wife, Marie Elizabeth Worth, died and was buried in Sep 1912 at Mount Feake Cemetery, Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 84 years.
  • Last Edited: 16 Jun 2014

Family: Marie Elizabeth Worth b. 1828, d. 14 Sep 1912

  • Josephine E. Varrell b. 1845
  • Cinderilla Varrell b. 1849
  • Eudavilla Varrell b. 1852, d. 1926
  • John Franklin Varrell b. Apr 1855
  • Sarah Maria Varrell b. between 1858 - 1859, d. 16 Nov 1946
  • Carrie M. Varrell b. 21 Mar 1862, d. 6 Feb 1887

Bernard Barton Vassall

b. 10 October 1835, d. 23 March 1894

Bernard B. Vassall
  • Father: Vester Vassall b. 31 Jul 1809, d. 8 Sep 1880
  • Mother: Sarah Barton b. 20 Mar 1811, d. 24 May 1874
  • Company: E
  • Bernard Barton Vassall was born on 10 Oct 1835 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Vester Vassall and Sarah Barton, (Note: his mother was the sister of Clara Barton, of Red Cross fame.)
  • Bernard Barton Vassall was enumerated in the household of Vester Vassall and Sarah Barton in the 1850 US Federal Census on 24 Sep 1850 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, (Noted: Two doors further, one David Barton, 49, a lawyer, brother of Sarah Barton, his mother.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Bernard gave his occupation as clerk.

  • On 1 Aug 1861 Bernard mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a 2nd Lieutenant, being credited to the quota of Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 9 months and 22 days old.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Bernard was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • In a letter dated 1890 to William H. Jeffrey, the author of "Richmond Prisons 1861-62," Vassal wrote about his prison experiences:
    "My Dear Sir:
    In reply, I would say that you have a valuable, interesting and authentic record of Liggon & Co's Tobacco Warehouse Prison, known as 'Rockett's No.1'. It is a gross historical inaccuracy to call this 'Libby Prison', and ought not to be perpetuated, as at this time (1861-62) no such prison was in existence. I was not a prisoner in 'Libby' for this reason. It has become a common error in speaking of prisoners of war, who were confined in Richmond at that time, to say that they were in 'Libby Prison', but such is not the case. The Union prisoners of war, captured at the first battle of Bull Run, Ball's Bluff, and scattering raids during the summer and fall of 1861, were confined in the tobacco warehouse of Liggon & Co., which was located on the bank of the James river, corner of Main and 25th streets. Your book is a record of this prison. It is the original and is correct.
    During the fall and winter , 1861-62 some of the prisoners were transferred to Salisbury, New Orleans, and Tuscaloosa. On February 19th, 1862, about three hundred and fifty officers, non-commissioned officers and privates were exchanged. This about the same number in prison, and on February 21st these were sent to Newport and delivered to the United States Government, on parole. Wnhen we left Richmond on that date there were left no prisoners of war in Richmond except three who were unable to be moved. This ended Rockett's or Liggon's Prison. In the summer of 1862, the Libby property was taken and the famous or infamous 'Libby Prison' came into existence.
    My signature in the old record is correct, as I remember having signed such a record, which was then in the hands of Lieutenant J.T.W. Hairston, at that time in charge of the prisons. He succeeded one Captain Gibbs. He (Hairston) was a gentleman, and treated all the officers in confinement as gentlemen. I never heard him say an unkind word to any officer, or knew him to commit an ungentlemanly act. The officers were confined on the lower floor, the two upper floors were used for the non-commissioned officers and privates. So far as treatment was concerned in the prison, the officers certainly had no cause to complain, especially in comparison with the subsequent treatment of prisoners.
    We were allowed our separate mess tables, and a private was detailed to cook for each mess. The fifteenth mess consisted of seven commissioned officers captured at Ball's Bluff, viz: Captain George W. Rockwood of Company A, now living at Marlboro, Massachusetts; Captain Symonds of Company B, afterwards killed; Captain Henry Bowman of Company C, now in Colorado: Captain J.M. Studley of Company D, afterwards Lieutenant-Colonel of Fifty-First Regiment, now in Providence, Rhode Island; Lieutenant J. Evarts Greene of Company F, now editor of the Worcester (Massachusetts) Spy; Lieutenant F. Harris Hooper of Boston, since dead, and myself.
    Our regiment was paid off a few days before the battle, and we all had money, as did many of the non-commissioned officers and privates. It was not taken from us. We were furnished with fair rations by the enemy, and were allowed to purchase such supplies as we desired when we didn't whistle 'Yankee Doodle', or sing the 'Star Spangled Banner'. Then our out-door supplies were shut off for a few days. Of course, we were not happy and suffered a great deal. But the most unpleasant sight I ever saw in the officers quarters was that of two hundred officers sitting on their cots picking off lice; but even this looks comical when seen through the mists of a quarter of a century. This gave us our prison motto, "Bite and be damned."
    Do not call your book a record of Libby Prison, it is not just to history, it is not just to the starved and murdered heroes who suffered and died there. The treatment which we received there, as compared to subsequent horrors of Libby, Belle Isle, and Andersonville, bears about the same relation to them as purgatory does to hell, in the once popular theology.
    One word concerning our prison song. it was sung almost every evening and every time some new verse was added, until it exceeded in length 'John Brown's Body'. The first added verse came in after the one referring to Congressman Ely, and reads:
    Chaplain Mine's turn will be next,
    And when he gets home he'll preach from the text,
    Roll on; etc. Roll on.
    Yours very truly
    B.B. Vassall, Webster, MA 1890.
  • In Oct 1861 Bernard Barton Vassall was mentioned in a report to the Richmond Dispatch about the arrival of federal prisoners in that city.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was mentioned in dispatches or (not necessarily correctly) among the casualties of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • An erroneous report of his death printed in the "Worcester Aegis and Transcript" as follows:
    Lieut Vassall- Among the officers of the Fifteen Regiment reported as probably killed at Edward's Ferry, is Lieut. Bernard B. Vassall of Oxford, twenty-five years.
    He was second Lieutenant of company E. We can but hope the painful rumor of his death may be without good foundation, as ? his death we must mourn the untimely fall of a friend sincerely esteemed for his amicable qualities and praise worthy endevors as in life.
    Mr. Vassall was a native of Oxford, but has been a resident of Washington city, where is parents reside, and was in business in North Carolina, where he held the office of postmaster at the place of his residence. His kind disposition and excellent character gave him many friends and no enemies, and his early loss, however nobly the sacrifice of his life was rendered, will bring poignant sorrow to all whose fortune it was, like ours, to know him well.-Taunton Gazette.
  • John Toomey wrote a letter to Dennis Toomey on 20 Nov 1861, mentioning Bernard B. Vassall, as follows:
    Camp Foster, Poolesville, Maryland
    November 20th 1861
    Dear Father and Mother.
    I write these few lines to you hopeing to find you in good health as this leaves me in at present thank God.
    Dear Parents. the weather is getting very cold now out here. they talk of moving away from here and going to Baltimore, but I dont no know true it is.
    we have been paid to day. we received two months pay which is 26 dollars and enclosed you will find 25 dollars in Government notes.
    Dear parents we had a letter from Lieutenant Vassel who is a prisoner in Richmond Via. he states that there is twenty of the boys belong to our company in prison with him. the wounded are not in Richmond. they are is Leesburgh. he said in his letter that he saw Patrick Feagen three hours after the flight and says that he was wounded. he did not say anything more about him. I think that if he was in danger of death from his wounds that he would mention it.
    Dear parents tell his sister about it and tell her that I am going to write to some of our boys who are wounded in Leesburgh and find out whether he is dead or alive. but I hope and trust in God that he is alive. I am almost sure that he is alive but I shall find out in a few days so as to be sure and as soon as I can find out, I shall write and let his sister no all about it. but I think that whe will see him in Oxford again and I hope she will. I miss him more than all the rest of the boys from our company.
    Dear parents I hope you and my brothers and sisters are in good health. I wish that you would write to me oftener than you do for I feel lonesome if I dont get a letter when the mail comes. Dear mother I have sent my picture by one of the wounded men that was going hime. he is a friend of Jonathan Dana and will leave it there for you. give my love to all inquiring friends. no more at present from your son
    John Toomey.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, 1Lt. Bernard B. Vassall was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 6 Aug 1862 Bernard was promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
  • On 6 Nov 1862 Bernard ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant.

  • On 9 Feb 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard B. Vassall was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • On 26 Nov 1863 Bernard Barton Vassall, 28, married Frances Maria Childs, 29, daughter of Benjamin Willis Childs and Elizabeth Southworth, at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Oct 1864 at The Bay State House, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the First Annual Reunion of the Fifteenth Regiment Association.
  • On 9 Apr 1865 his brother, Irving Stetson Vassall, died at Washington, DC, at age 24.
  • On 6 Jul 1872 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Reunions Sammel-Events was mentioned as having attended the fifth reunion of company E:
    The fifth annaual reunion of Co. E. 15th regiment Mass. vols. was held in Oxford Friday, the 28th of June. Twenty of the old members were present. Incidents of the war veterans were recalled affording much pleasure. An excellent diner was furnished by A. B. yeomans. A pleasant hour was passed in a call on Hon. Alexander DeWitt the following officers were elected for the year ensueing; president, B. B. Vassal; Vice Prsedents, Marquis E. Steere, Simeon H. Waters; Secretary and Treasurer, L. E. Thayer; Directors, A. B. Yeomans, Henry J. Ball, Wm. Y. Woodbury. Adjourned to meet in Oxford June 28, 1873. There have died from the company’s number during the year: Lieut J.M. Norcross, in Sutton March 20th 1872; Chas. H. Beatty, in Worcester March 6th, 1873; Cyrus J. Dodd, in Boston, March 3d, 1871.
  • On 27 Jun 1873 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Reunions Sammel-Events attended a meeting of the Co. E association:
    The sixth annual meeting of Co. E Association, 15th regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, DeWitt guards, was held in Oxford, Saturday, it being the anniversary of the departure of the company from the town to go into camp. The officers chosen for the ensuing year as as follows:
    President, B. B. Vassall; Vice Presidents, M. E. Steere and S. H. Walters; Secretary and Treasurer, L. E. Thayer; Directors, A. B. Yeomans, Henry J. Ball and Wm. Y. Woodbury. The meeting, after the election of officers, adjourned to meet in Oxford, June 27, 1874.
  • In 1879 Bernard and Frances Maria Childs were living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 28 Jun 1879 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • From the Hammond Genealogy --
    He was a lieutenant in the Oxford company which went to the Civil war, was captured and held prisoner at Ball's Bluff, Va. Was some years in the U. S. postal service. A grocer at Newton Lower Falls, Mass., for some years.
  • Bernard was employed at as a Civil Servant. He was associated with his uncle, Stephen Barton, in the lumber business in North Carolina. At the outbreak of the civil war he returned to Oxford joining the DeWitt Guards which became Company E, 15th MA Volunteers and was commissioned a Lieutenant. He was captured at the Battle of Balls Bluff and held at Richmond, VA. He was paroled to Anapolis, MD where he waited to be exchanged. Bernard began the genealogical inquirys which resulted in the Rev. William Barton publishing his work in Vol 64 (Oct. 1930) of the NEHGR.
  • He and Frances Maria Childs were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a State Official, and his father Collects Rent.
  • On 21 Oct 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the 14th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment.
  • On 1 Jul 1881 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard B. Vassall was reported as attending the fourteenth annual meeting of Co. E. Association, 15th Regiment, Mass. Vols.--
    From The Webster Times, July 1, 1881(Volume XXIII # 20)
    The fourteenth annual meeting of Co. E. Association, 15th Regiment, Mass. Vols., was held on Tuesday in Memorial Hall. The visiting comrades and guests were received at the depot by Post 27, L. E. Thayer, commander. Lieut. B. B. Vassal presided over the meeting. The day was one of great enjoyment to all the members of the association. Short addresses were made by Rev. Mr. Emmons, Dr. S. O. Paine, A. L. Joslin, G. P. Daniels, Rev. I. T. Johnson, B. B. Vassal, A. J. Kirby, G. H. Stevens, L. E. Thayer, also by Gen. Picket and Mr. A. Borden of Post 10 G. A. R.
    P. F. Murray read an interesting paper on the doings of the company while in service. George Hodges gave an account of his California trip, showing quite clearly that the ways of some “Californians” not “heathen chinee” are “peculiar.”
    At the business meeting the death of Capt Albert Prince and Fred A. Hall were reported. The following officers were chosen for the ensuing year: president B. B. Vassal; Vice-President Charles A. Bacon; Secretary and Treasurer L. E. Thayer; Directors Otis Hoyle; Edward Cudworth; John W. Humphrey.
    A nice repast was furnished at the expense of George Hodges, who received the thanks of those present for his generosity. Caterer Mars, of Worcester, attended to the wants of the inner man. At the head table was a handsome bouquet presented by a Worcester lady. The meeting was adjourned until June 28, 1882.
  • On 20 Oct 1883 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the 17th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 110 other veterans of the regiment. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 21 Oct 1884 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the 18th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • In 1886 Bernard was living at Newton Lower Falls, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Bernard Barton Vassall took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • On 9 Jul 1886 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was reported as having attended the 19th reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 5 Jul 1889 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended a reunion of Company E; from The Webster Times, July 5, 1889 (Volume XXXI # 19),
    Reviving War Memories
    Twenty-eight years ago last Friday Company E, 15th regiment, left Oxford for the front, and , as is their usual custom, the surviving members of the company met at Oxford last Friday in reunion. The comrades met at the hall of Post No. 27 G. A. R. where these officers were selected:
    President--- Capt. B. B. Vassal
    Vice-President---Capt. Charles H. Watson
    Secretary and Treasurer---L. E. Thayer
    Directors, A. B. Yeomans, W. Y. Woodbury and Anthony Murphy.
    Comrades were present from Rhode Island and Maine and from various parts of Massachusetts, twenty-five in all being present. The roll was called and many letters from absent comrades were received.
    During the proceedings Rev. Albert Tyler created a sensation. He rose and said he had received a spiritual communication from Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew, who died in Philadelphia, in November 1861, on his way home. The message said that the spirit of Bartholomew was with them during the meeting, which was most enjoyable to him, and that he had the same love he had for his comrades as he had in 1861.
    The comrades adjourned to Memorial Hall for dinner, after which, Capt Vassal called the assemblage to order and gave an address of welcome. Capt. C. H. Watson, the first commander of the company, Comrades P. F. Murray, W. Y. Woodbury, A. B. Yeomans, L. E. Thayer, Rev. Albert Tyler, Rev. Ithiel Johnson and others were called on and spoke of personal experiences and memories which were brought up by the stories of others.
  • In 1890 Bernard was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 28 Jun 1890 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall attended the 23rd annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • On 8 Jul 1892 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was reported among those attending a reunion of Company E.
  • On 7 Jul 1893 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Bernard Barton Vassall was reported as attending the 26th annuel meeting of the Company E association. From The Webster Times, July 7, 1893(Volume XXXVI # 19)
    Company E. Association, 15th Regiment, M. V. M., held its 26th annual meeting in Memorial Hall last week. Roll Call at 11a. m., business meeting, 11:30; dinner at 1 p. m. prepared by Comrade Yeomans and wife. The survivors were called to order by President W. F. Miller. The roll call showed that the only death reported during the year was that of Patrick Feigan, who died in Boston, April 7, 1893, and was buried in St. Roch cemetery of Oxford.
    The following officers were elected for the coming year; President, W. F. Miller of Worcester; Vice President, P. F. Murray of Worcester; Secretary and Treasurer L. E. Thayer of Oxford; Directors, A. B. Yeomans of Oxford, John Humphrey of Oxford, and Oscar L. Guild of Lynn.
    Among the speakers were Rev. Albert Tyler who invoked the blessing; Capt. Murray of Worcester; Capt. B. B. Vassal of Worcester; Secretary L. E. Thayer of Oxford; Caleb F. Dudley; John Humphrey who left an arm at Antietam; Edward Lovely of Spencer; A. B. Hudson of Grafton; and Robert Lusty of Palmer who left a leg at Gettysburg.
  • On 22 Mar 1894 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, it is noted that:
    "Capt. B. B. Vassall, one of the old 15th regiment soldiers, is seriously ill at the residence of B. W. Childs on Cedar street."
  • He died on 23 Mar 1894 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 58 years, 5 months and 13 days old.
  • He was buried on 26 Mar 1894 at North Cemetery, Main Street, Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 30 Mar 1894 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, it is noted that: "Samuel R. Barton has received a letter from Miss Clara Barton, in which she speaks feelingly of the death of her nephew, Capt. Vassall."
  • An obituary for Bernard Barton Vassall was published on 30 Mar 1894 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: (Volume XXXVII # 5)
    OXFORD
    DEATH OF LIEUT. BERNARD B. VASSAL

    Lieut. Bernard Barton Vassall died at the residence of his brother-in-law, B. W. Childs, Esq., No. 38 Cedar street, Worcester, on Friday morning last. He had been confined to the house but a few days, though in failing health for some length of time from Bright’s disease. He was born in Oxford 59 years ago the 10th of October. His father was Vester Vassall, a well known citizen of North Oxford, who removed to Washington a little before the war. His mother, before her marriage, was Miss Charlotte Barton, a daughter of Capt. Stephen Barton, and a sister of the renowned Clara Barton of the war.
    His mother was the first woman to welcome the 6th Regiment to Washington after its bloody passage through Baltimore. Lieut. Vassall spent a few years just before the war in North Carolina in the lumber business with his uncle, Stephen Barton, and when the war broke out he returned to Oxford and enlisted in the DeWitt Guards, which became Co. E of the 15th Regiment. He went into service in July, 1861 as 2d lieutenant of his company. He was in the battle of Ball’s Bluff, was captured in that disastrous fight. was transferred to the rebel prison at Richmond, where he remained until the following February, and was then paroled and transferred to Annapolis with many others.
    The day the paroled Union troops marched through Richmond was the date of Jeff Davis’ inauguration as President of the Confederacy, and when they marched through they sang the old patriotic songs which they sang on going to the front, and in telling of this incident, Lieut. Vassall recalled the fact that they were cheered all along the route by the Richmond people. He tired of waiting under his parole to be exchanged, and resigned his commission ( the ) Dec. following. After his discharge from the army, Lieut. Vassall was for some time in the surgeon general’s office, and after the war was employed in the post office department as a special agent, and in that capacity he traveled all through the South, reorganizing the old and new post offices.
    He was relieved of this position during the administration of President Grant, but not before he had organized the railway postal system in New England of which he was the head. After this he was the agent of the State Board of Charities for about 9 years. Later he kept a grocery store in Newton Lower Falls, but this did not prove a success, and he gave up the business and returned to Worcester 7 or 8 years ago. He also served several years as agent for Samuel R. Barton & Co., in the insurance business in Webster. He has been in poor health most of this time. The origin of this trouble was the injury receive at Ball’s Bluff, but he never would consent to apply for a pension, and said he never would accept one from his country for the services he was proud to have given her. Lieut. Vassall was the first Commander of Post 27, of this town. He died a member of post 62, of Newton.
    The funeral service was held at the residence of Mr. Childs, where he died on Monday, at 11 o’clock. Rev. Mr. Stebbins conducted the services, which were attended by many distinguished military men, his associates in the field and of the Grand Army, and his many friends in civil and business life. Many flowers bloomed around his pillow, one loving bouquet coming from his aunt, Miss. Clara Barton, too far away to be personally present. The burial was at Oxford with the appointed service of the Grand Army, read by Commander Johnson and Chaplain Bixby. The service closed with a brief address and prayer by Rev. Mr. Tyler, the long time friend of the family.
    The parting salute followed, and Lieut. Vassall sleeps with his kindred. The bearers were, Capt. J. Evarts Greene, P. M., Col. E. J. Russell, Capt. P. F. Murray and Capt. Amos Bartlett, of Webster.
  • On 3 Apr 1894 Frances Maria Childs received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Bernard's service; and received certificate number 444771.
  • Credits: Primary photo above by permission of the Worcester Historical Museum, Ward Collection.
  • Last Edited: 26 Oct 2016

Family: Frances Maria Childs b. 21 Mar 1834