Isaac Mathews

b. July 1843, d. December 1926
  • Father: David Mathews b. 1801
  • Mother: Sarah Ann Jones b. Apr 1803, d. 25 Dec 1900
  • Company: F
  • Isaac Mathews was born in Jul 1843 at New York, son of David Mathews and Sarah Ann Jones.
  • Isaac Mathews was enumerated in the household of David Mathews and Sarah Ann Jones in the 1850 US Federal Census on 3 Oct 1850 at Chester, Orange County, New York, as:
    David Mathews, 49, farmer, b. NY (as were all)
    Sarah A., 38
    Elizabeth, 13
    Andrew J., 7
    Isaac, 5
    Harriet, 4
    Abigal A., 3
    Anna, 0.
  • Isaac Mathews was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 28 Jul 1860 at Monroe, Orange County, New York, as age 17, farm laborer, b. NY, in the home of one James Cratty.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Isaac gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Isaac mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 18 years old.
  • On 4 Jan 1864, Isaac was reenlisted as a musician, having received a bounty of $325.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Isaac ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 27 Jul 1864 Isaac N. Matthews appeared on the muster rolls of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry asssigned to Company E.
  • He ended his service with the 20th Massachusetts, Company E as a musician on 16 Jul 1865.
  • On 5 Jul 1869 Isaac Mathews married Julia A. Campbell at Vernon, Sussex County, New Jersey.
  • Isaac Mathews and Julia A. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 22 Jun 1870 at Warwick, Orange County, New York, as:
    Mathews, Isaac, Jr. 27, stone mason, b. NY
    ---, Julia, 29, b. NJ
    Campbell, John, 13, b. NJ (step-son)
    ---, William H., 7, b. NY (step-son.)
  • Isaac Mathews and Julia A. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1880 at Florida, Orange County, New York, as:
    Mathews, Isaac, 38, brick mason, b. NY
    ---, Julia A., 40, wife, b. NJ.
  • Isaac Mathews made application for a veteran's pension on 23 Feb 1909, for his service in the 20th Massachusetts, and received certificatte 1041009.
  • He and Julia A. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 8 Apr 1910 at Belleville, Essex County, New Jersey, as:
    Isaac Mathews, 67, married 1st for 40 years, b. NY, stone and brick mason
    Julia, 68, wife, married 2nd, for 40 years, two of three children living, b. NJ
    Harrison Campbell, 48, step-son, single, b. NY.
  • Isaac Mathews died in Dec 1926 at Florida, Orange County, New York. He was 83 years and 5 months old.
  • Last Edited: 23 Mar 2012

Family: Julia A. [--?--] b. 1841, d. before 1900

Frank Matt

b. 14 February 1824
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Frank Matt was born on 14 Feb 1824 at Austria if the right man has been identified.
  • In 1862 Frank was living at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Frank gave his occupation as Shoemaker.

  • On 8 Sep 1862 Frank Matt mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 38 years, 6 months and 25 days old.
  • On 20 Dec 1863 Frank reenlisted, having received a bounty of $325.
  • On 21 Oct 1864 Frank ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by transfer.

  • Starting 21 Oct 1864, Frank also served in the 19th Infantry Regiment Massachusetts, Company K.
  • He ended his service with 19th Massachusetts Infantry on 30 Jun 1865 at Munson's Hill, Virginia.
  • Last Edited: 18 Dec 2014

Joseph B. Matthews

b. 14 August 1819, d. 30 August 1897
  • Father: Ebenezer Matthews b. 1786, d. 13 Sep 1868
  • Mother: Roxanna Snell b. 1788, d. 30 Jan 1849
  • Company: B
  • Joseph B. Matthews was born on 14 Aug 1819 at Sidney, Kennebec County, Maine, son of Ebenezer Matthews and Roxanna Snell.
  • Joseph B. Matthews married Susan Mathews, daughter of Jonathan Mathews and Susannah [--?--], at Maine.
  • Joseph B. Matthews and Susan Mathews were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 24 Jul 1850 at Monson, Piscataquis County, Maine, as:
    Joseph B Mathews , 30
    Susanna, 25
    Arianna, 3
    George H., 7
    Charles H., 4
    Susanna, 0.
  • Joseph B. Matthews and Susan Mathews were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 12 Aug 1860 at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Joseph B Mathews, 40, chairmaker, b. ME (as were all)
    Susanah, 36
    George H., 17
    Charles H., 14
    Arinana J., 13
    Susan, 10.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Joseph gave his occupation as tub and pail maker.
  • In 1861 Joseph was living at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Joseph mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 41 years, 10 months and 28 days old.
  • On 3 Jul 1863 Joseph was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, in both legs.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph B. Matthews was reported as wounded at Gettysburg.
  • On 16 Apr 1864 Joseph ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, due to disability.

  • On 18 Jun 1867 Joseph and Susan's daughter, Arianna J. Matthews married George M. Stearns at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Joseph B. Matthews and Susan Mathews were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 20 Jul 1870 at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Joseph B Matthews, 50, saloon keeper, b. ME
    Susannah, 46, b. ME
    Susa A , 20, b. ME.
  • On 27 Nov 1870 Susan Mathews, his wife, died at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 46 of consumption.
  • On 12 Mar 1872 Joseph B. Matthews, 52, married Lucy M. Kendall, 48, daughter of Israel C. Brown and Polly Barrett, at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both.
  • On 1 Jul 1879 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph B. Matthews attended the annual reunion of Company B, 15th Massachusetts, the Fitchburg Fisiliers. (Click icon to read the report in the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • He and Lucy M. Brown were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1880 at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Matthews, Joseph B., 60, wood worker, b. ME (as were his parents)
    ---, Lucy, 56, wife, b. MA
    ---, Susie A., 29, dau, b. ME.
  • On 29 Nov 1882 Joseph and Susan's daughter, Susie A. Matthews married John Mcgown at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Joseph B. Matthews attended the funeral of Roland Edwin Bowen in Jan 1883 at Millbury Central Cemetery, Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Joseph was living at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 28 Jun 1888 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph B. Matthews attended a reunion of Company B, The Fusiliers.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company B.
  • On 28 Jun 1894 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph B. Matthews attended the annual reunion of Company B ("Fitchburg Fusiliers"). From The Fitchburg Sentinel, 28 June 1894
    Veteran Fusiliers' Reunion
    On a bright June day like this, 33 years ago, today, the Fitchburg Fusiliers marched down Main street to the old depot and took a train for Worcester where they, with the other companies of the 15th Mass. regiment went into camp at Camp Scott, remaining till Aug. 8, when they went to the front.
    The survivors of the company, with honorary members of the association and other friends, held their annual reunion at Whalom park, today. A good number of lady friends of the veterans were present.
    The business meeting was held in the grove at 11:30 a.m. The following officers and members of the company responded to roll call. Gen. John W. Kimball, Capt. Charles H. Eager, Lieut. J. Myron Goddard, Sergt. Walter A. Eames, Privates John R. Farnum, Artemas A. Gibson, William Gibson, Granville C. Hosmer, Wallace W. Holman, Edward S. Kendall, Herbert D. McIntire, Joseph B. Matthews, George G. Taylor, Henry F. Whittemore. Honorary members -- Harrington Sibley, Charles May, F. A. Monroe, Edward F. Kimball, Albert McIntire, Samuel Osborne, Elmer W. Holman, C. A. Tenney, C. H. Toomey, James Harrington.
    The record of the last meeting was read by the clerk, E. S. Kendall, and approved and the report of the treasurer showing a balance of $41.59 was accepted.
    The following officers were chosen -- Capt, John W. Kimball; first leiutenant, J. Myron Goddard, Wakefield; second lieutenant, Charles H. Eager, Belmont; clerk and treasurer, Edward S. Kendall, Westminster; auditors -- Gen. J. W. Kimball, Herbert D. McIntire, Artemas A. Gibson.
  • On 1 Jan 1896 Joseph and Susan's daughter, Susie A. Matthews married Harlan P. Smart at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both.
  • Joseph B. Matthews died on 30 Aug 1897 at Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of general disability. He was 78 years and 16 days old.
  • He was buried on 1 Sep 1897 at Riverside Cemetery, Winchendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • An obituary for Joseph B. Matthews was published on 2 Sep 1897 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Winchendon

    Joseph B. Matthews died on Monday. He was a member of Company B, 15th Mass. regiment, enlisting in July, 1861, and received an honorable discharge in July, 1863, on account of wounds disabling him for service. He was a member of Gilman C. Parker Post, beloved by his comrades for his bravery in battle and his interest for the welfare of the Post. His funeral was held, Wednesday, under the auspices of his surviving comrades.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension, or his wife applied for a widow's pension, but no further information is known.
  • Lucy outlived Joseph and died on 6 Sep 1912 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 88.
  • Last Edited: 11 Apr 2016

Family 1: Susan Mathews b. 27 Jun 1824, d. 27 Nov 1870

  • George H. Matthews b. 1843
  • Charles H. Matthews b. 1846
  • Arianna J. Matthews b. 1847
  • Susie A. Matthews b. 1850

Family 2: Lucy M. Brown b. 14 Oct 1823, d. 6 Sep 1912

William Matthews

b. 26 October 1834, d. 13 December 1862
  • Father: Robert Matthews b. between 1803 - 1804
  • Mother: Maryann [--?--] b. between 1813 - 1814
  • Company: G
  • William Matthews was born on 26 Oct 1834 at Staverton, Wiltshire, England, son of Robert Matthews and Maryann [--?--].
  • William Matthews was baptized on 21 Dec 1834 at Wesleyan Methodist, Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Robert Matthews and Maryann [--?--] in the 1851 UK Census in Apr 1851 at Marsh, Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England, as:
    Robert Matthews, head, 47, gardner, b. Wilts,Keevil
    Maryann, wife, 37, cloth weaver, b. Wilts, Hilperton
    John, 17, son, at home, b. Wilts, Staverton (as were all the children)
    **William, son, 16, weaver at home
    Samuel, son, 14, farm laborer
    Thomas, son, 12, apprentice shoe maker
    Sarah, daur, 10
    Solomon, son, 8
    Lydia, 6
    Mary, 4
    Jabez, son, 3
    Pricilla, daur, 1.
  • On 29 Sep 1855 William Matthews, 20, married Emma Merritt, 12, daughter of William Merritt and Mary Hillier, at Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island, (Note: although the marriage record says both were 21, Emma was far from it as confirmed by the 1870 census.)
  • William Matthews and Emma Merritt were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 24 Jul 1860 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William Mathews, 25, gardner, b. England
    Emma, 25, b. England
    William H., 2, b. MA
    Mary A., 8/12, b. MA
    Lydia, 16, b. England (his younger sister.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as gardener.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 8 months and 16 days old.
  • He died on 13 Dec 1862 at The Battle of Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, killed in action. He was 28 years, 1 month and 17 days old.
  • On 26 Jan 1863 Emma Merritt received a pension to surviving family member based on William's service; his wife, received certificate 4643.
  • On 1 Nov 1863 William's widow, Emma Matthews remarried to John Whitehead at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both.
  • On 11 Apr 1864 John Whitehead made application for a pension as guardian to William's surviving dependants, and received certificate 24304.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of John Whitehead and Emma Merritt in the 1870 US Federal Census on 21 Aug 1870 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Whitehead, John, 48, works in cotton mill, b. England
    **---, Emma, 26, b. England
    ---, Emmie, 19, works in cotton mill, b. MA
    **---, William H., 13, b. MA
    **---, Mary A., 11, b. MA
    ---, Estele E., 6, b. MA
    ---, Erving, 3, b. MA.
  • John Whitehead died on 26 May 1904 at Plainfield, Windham County, Connecticut.
  • On 1 Aug 1904, Central Village, Windham County, Connecticut, Emma Merritt was returned to the pension rolls at the rate of $12 per month.
  • Emma, his wife, outlived William and died in Feb 1909 at age 65.
  • On 9 Nov 1909, Emma Merritt was dropped from the pension rolls.
  • Last Edited: 27 Mar 2013

Family: Emma Merritt b. 30 Jul 1843, d. Feb 1909

  • William Henry Matthews b. 18 Nov 1857
  • Mary Ann Matthews b. 13 Nov 1859

Chauncy B. Mattoon

b. 3 November 1839, d. 14 April 1920
  • Father: Hezekiah Mattoon b. 22 Dec 1808, d. 1875
  • Mother: Mary Augusta Maynard b. 1811, d. 21 Aug 1843
  • Company: MusBand
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon was born on 3 Nov 1839 at Northfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, son of Hezekiah Mattoon and Mary Augusta Maynard.
  • On 21 Aug 1843 his mother, Mary Augusta Maynard, died.
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon was enumerated in the household of Hezekiah Mattoon in the 1850 US Federal Census on 26 Jul 1850 at Northfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, as:
    Hezekiah Mattoon, 41, farmer, $3500 property, b. MA (as were all in the household)
    Dwight L., 16
    Lucia Ann, 14
    Grover J., 12
    **Chancey B., 10
    Mary A., 8
    Nancy Newell, 42
    Wm. C. Newell, 24, clerk.
  • In 1861 Chauncy was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Chauncy gave his occupation as painter.

  • On 5 Aug 1861 Chauncy mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Bandsman, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years, 9 months and 2 days old.
  • On 8 Aug 1862 Chauncy ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by order of the War Department to release all bandsmen.

  • On 11 Jun 1871 Chauncy B. Mattoon, 31, married Mary Savilla Kieffer, 26, at Kosciusko County, Indiana.
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon and Mary Savilla Kieffer were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1880 at Columbia City, Whitley County, Indiana, as:
    Mattoon, C. B., 40, R. R. Agent, b. MA
    ---, Savilla, 34, wife, b. PA
    ---, Grover, 8, son, b. Ind
    ---, John, 5, son, b. Ind
    ---, Harry, 1, son b. Ind.
  • On 1 Sep 1880 Mary Savilla Kieffer, his wife, died at age 35.
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon made application at Indiana for a veteran's pension on 29 Jul 1890.
  • On 4 Dec 1892 Chauncy B. Mattoon, 53, married Mattie A. Lininger, 39, at Whitley County, Indiana, a widow.
  • In 1896, Chauncy was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • He and Mattie A. Stough were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1900 at Columbia City, Whitley County, Indiana, as:
    Matoon, Chauncy B., head, b. Nov 1839, 60, married 8 years, b. MA (of MA parents), deputy auditor N. C. O.
    ---, Mattie A., wife, b. Apr 1853, one of her three children living, b. OH (of PA parents)
    Lininger, Ralph S., step-son, b. Aug 1879, single, b. Ind (of OH parents.)
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon and Mattie A. Stough were enumerated in the 1920 US Federal Census on 2 Jan 1920 at Columbia City, Whitley County, Indiana.
  • Chauncy B. Mattoon died on 14 Apr 1920 at Columbia City, Whitley County, Indiana. He was 80 years, 5 months and 11 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1920 at Greenhill Cemetery, Columbia City, Whitley County, Indiana, with his wife, in section GH-Masonic-1-1-12.
  • On 22 Apr 1920 Mattie A. Stough received a pension to surviving family member in Indiana based on Chauncy's service; his wife, received certificate number 893430.
  • Mattie, his second wife, outlived Chauncy and died in 1931.
  • Last Edited: 11 Apr 2016

Family 1: Mary Savilla Kieffer b. 26 May 1845, d. 1 Sep 1880

  • Grover B. Mattoon b. 12 Jun 1871, d. 4 Feb 1918
  • John L. Mattoon b. 1875, d. 1945
  • Harry Mattoon b. between 1878 - 1879

Family 2: Mattie A. Stough b. Apr 1853, d. 1931

Eleazer Mattoon

b. between 1826 and 1827, d. 25 March 1910
  • Company: 1_SS
  • William Mattoon was an alias according to the pension file index.
  • Eleazer Mattoon was born between 1826 - 1827 at Massachusetts.
  • Starting 2 Jan 1849, Eleazer also served in the Navy on the "Franklin."
  • He ended his service with the Navy on the "Franklin" on 9 Feb 1852.
  • On 10 Jan 1856 Elizer Mattoon married Eliza M. Botefuhr at Macon County, Illinois.
  • In 1861 Eleazer was living at Bunker Hill, Macoupin County, Illinois.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Eleazer gave his occupation as Farmer.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 Eleazer Mattoon mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters.
  • On 13 Mar 1862 at "Salem Register", Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, Eleazer Mattoon was mentioned in an article about the bodyguard which returned the deceased General Lander to Salem for interment. He may have been included in a group photo believed to have been taken of the Sharpshooters selected to accompany General. The officer standing at the far left is Captain John "Jack" Saunders.
  • On 5 Feb 1863 Eleazer ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters at Washington, DC, by discharge for disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 10 Sep 1866, and received certificate number 524550.
  • He and Eliza M. Botefuhr were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1870 at Bunker Hill P. O., Township 7 Range 8, Macoupin County, Illinois, as:
    Mattoon, Eleazer, 44, house carpenter, b. MA
    ---, Mary, 31, b. Holstein
    ---, Fredrich E., 12, b. IL
    ---, Mary, 6, b. IL
    ---, Lula, 3, b. IL
    ---, William, 2/12, b. IL.
  • On 16 Sep 1890, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (Pacific Branch), Sawtelle, Los Angeles County, California, Eleazer was admitted.
  • He died on 25 Mar 1910 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (Pacific Branch), Sawtelle, Los Angeles County, California.
  • He was buried in Mar 1910 at Los Angeles National Cemetery (Sawtelle), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, Sec. 16, row J, no. 13.
  • Last Edited: 8 May 2016

Family: Eliza M. Botefuhr b. 1839

  • Fredrich E. Mattoon b. 1858
  • Mary Mattoon b. 1864
  • Lula Mattoon b. 1867
  • William Mattoon b. Apr 1870

Joseph B. Maxfield

b. between 1837 and 1838, d. 10 November 1862
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Joseph B. Maxfield was born between 1837 - 1838.
  • On 7 Oct 1858 Joseph B. Maxfield married Eliza A. Earle, 17, daughter of Levi Furbush and Elmira Davis, at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, (Note: she had been adopted and EARLE was the name of her adoptive family.)
  • Joseph B. Maxfield and Eliza A. Furbush were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 15 Jun 1860 at South Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Jos. Maxfield, 22, shoe maker, b. MA
    Eliza A., 19, b. ME
    Almira, 9/12, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Joseph gave his occupation as Shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Joseph was living at South Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 Joseph B. Maxfield mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters.
  • He died on 10 Nov 1862 at Bolivar, West Virginia.
  • On 6 Dec 1862 Eliza A. Furbush received a pension to surviving family member based on Joseph's service; his wife received certificate number 12420.
  • On 6 Mar 1865 Joseph's widow, Eliza A. Furbush remarried to John Gregory at South Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her.
  • On 4 Aug 1865 John Gregory made application for a pension as guardian to Joseph's surviving dependants, and received certificate number 70972.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of John Gregory and Eliza A. Furbush in the 1870 US Federal Census on 14 Jun 1870 at Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, as:
    Gregory, John, 26, currier (leather worker), b. NH (sic)
    ---, Eliza A., 29, b. ME
    ---, Almira M., 10, b. MA (Joseph's daughter)
    ---, Wm. H., 4, b. MA
    ---, Eliza L., 2, b. MA.
  • On 24 Mar 1877 Joseph and Eliza's daughter, Elmira Lewis Maxfield married George H. Chaplin at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • On 18 Mar 1878 his grandson, Lewis Henry Chaplin, son of George H. Chaplin and Elmira Lewis Maxfield, was born at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Aug 1887 Joseph and Eliza's daughter, Elmira Lewis Maxfield married Charles John Giesler at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both.
  • Eliza, his wife, outlived Joseph and died on 11 Oct 1914 at Manchester, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 73.
  • Last Edited: 18 Jan 2012

Family: Eliza A. Furbush b. 24 Aug 1841, d. 11 Oct 1914

  • Elmira Lewis Maxfield b. 16 Oct 1859

Charles Franklin May

b. 24 January 1843, d. 22 May 1898
  • Father: Charles May b. 8 Oct 1820
  • Mother: Martha Whitney b. between 1807 - 1808
  • Company: A
  • Charles Franklin May was born on 24 Jan 1843 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Charles May and Martha Whitney.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Charles gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 16 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 18 years, 5 months and 22 days old.
  • In Sep 1863 Charles Franklin May was court martialed at Morrisville, Fauquier County, Virginia, as documented in case number NN-241 (National Archives, Record Group 153.)

  • On 23 Dec 1863 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry having reenlisted for a bounty of $325. He was 20 years, 10 months and 29 days old.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry while absent wounded.

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Charles also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company G.
  • He witnessed the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on 14 Apr 1865 at Ford's Theater, Washington, DC.
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 16 Jun 1865.
  • On 6 Nov 1876 Charles Franklin May, 33, married Julia A. Wheeler, 17, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Charles Franklin May was enumerated in the household of Martha Whitney in the 1880 US Federal Census on on 9 Jun 1880 at at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    May, Martha, 72, b. MA (as were all in the household)
    **---, Charles F., 37, son, works in ?? shop
    ---, Julia A., 21, dau-in-law
    ---, Willie F., 2, grand-son
    Russell, Henry A., 38, son-in-law, works in ?? shop
    ---, Martha A., 28, dau
    ---, Perley M., 5, grand-son, b. NH.
  • On 21 Oct 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the 14th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment.
  • Charles was apparently an accomplished violinist and always welcomed at the regimental reunions where he played the familiar tunes.
  • On 21 Oct 1882 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the 16th annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 28 Jun 1883 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the 15th reunion of Company B, Fitchburg Fusiliers. From The Fitchburg Sentinel, 29 June 1883
    Veteran Fusiliers' Reunion
    The 15th annual reunion of Co. B (Veteran Fusiliers) 15th Regt., was held at Wachusett Park on Thursday, June 28th. At a few minutes past noon the business meeting was called to order by 1st Lieut. John W. Kimball (the captain being absent); 22 comrades were present when the roll was called by the sergeant. The treasurer reported $5.68 in the treasury. The following list of officers were chosen for the ensuing year: Captain, John W. Kimball; 1st Lieut., William E. Taylor; 2d Lieut., Lyman Nichols; 1st Sergt., clerk and treasurer, Henry A. Spooner. The place of holding the next reunion was left to the discretion of the officers elect.
    Walter A. Eames, John W. Kimball and Henry A. Spooner were appointed to draft resolutions on the death of Comrades Roland E. Bowen and Orlando Wetherbee, who have died since the last reunion. Letters were read from Comrades A. J. Nye of Athol and Charles H. Eager of Boston. Captain Kimball stated that, since the death of AiOsborne, the association has but three honorary members (A. W. Benjamin of Westminster, Harrington Sibley and George H. Boss of Fitchburg)-- and he recommended that those who take an interest in the association and attend the reunions, bemade honorary members. On motion of Walter A. Eames, the recommendation was adopted and the following names were placed on the rolls of the association as honorary members:
    Charles Devens of Worcester, Charles May of Leominster, ---- Bowen of Millbury, Charles T. Bateman of Boston, Walter C. Eames of Belmont, Wilbur Taylor, D. H. Piper and Harry Taylor of Winchendon, Charles Nichols, Marcus M. Nichols and George W. Gibbs of Westminster, Edward F. Kimball, Edward H. Fletcher, S. G. Frost, Cyrus Thurston, Sidney Sibley, F. A. Monroe, Albert McIntire, M. Edwin Day, Fred A. Bruce and Samuel F. Spooner of Fitchburg.
    A bountiful collation was served in the grove and the afternoon was agreeably spent in games, boating and dancing to the music of a violin manipulated by Charles May of Leominster. At about 7 p.m. the festivities of the day were brought to a close by all uniting in singing "Auld Lang Syne."
  • On 20 Oct 1883 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the 17th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 110 other veterans of the regiment. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 21 Oct 1884 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the 18th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • In 1886 Charles was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Charles Franklin May took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • He and Julia A. Wheeler were divorced on 2 Dec 1887 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Charles Franklin May made application for a veteran's pension on 25 Jun 1888, and received certificate number 238591.
  • On 21 Oct 1888 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Franklin May attended the annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel., Monday, 22 October 1888)
    Fifteenth Regiment Reunion
    The annual reunion of the veterans of the 15th Mass. regiment was held at Worcester, Saturday, and was greatly enjoyed by all who attended. The veterans, about 125 in number, formed by companies and were photographed on the common, near the soldiers' monument. Dinner was served at the Bay State House. Judge Devens presided, and made an eloquent speech, in which he referred to the 15th regiment as losing more men, in proportion to its members, than any other Mass. regiment.
    Col. J. M. Studley followed with some interesting memories of war times, and nearly every company was represented among the speakers.
    Sergt. Henry A. Spooner, for Co. B, told an amusing story of the strictmess of discipline in the regiment, and asked for a speech from A. A. Simonds of Dayton, Ohio.
    Mr. Simonds spoke of the hard service that the regiment went through in the Wilderness campaign. He said that on visiting the field of Waterloo he was impressed with the openness of the field, which allowed for evolution which the field of Gettysburg made impossible. He closed by expressing his pleasure at being able to attend the reunion.
    Among the other speakers were:
    Dr. C. A. Wheeler,
    Capt. T. J. Hastings,
    J. E. Greene,
    D. M. EArle and others.
    Charles May, with his fiddle, and several members of the old regimental band, furnished popular music for the occasion.
  • He died on 22 May 1898 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 55 years, 3 months and 28 days old.
  • An obituary for Charles Franklin May was published as follows: from the "Fitchburg Sentinel," Monday, 23 May 1898,
    The Last Roll Call
    Charles F. may, 55, a musician of considerable more than local renown, died at the home of his sister, Mrs. Martha H. Russell, 130 Central street, with whom he boarded, Sunday morning, after a long and painful illness caused by gall stones. Deceased was a veteran of the late war and a member of Post 53, G. A. R. He entered the service at Camp Scott, Worcester, July 30, 1861. as a private of Co. A, 15th regiment Mass. infantry, and was discharged, Dec. 21, 1863, by reason of a re-enlistment as a veteran volunteer, on the same date. He was transferred to Co. G, 20th regiment and received his final discharge, July 16, 1865. He was wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 11, 1864, and became an inmate of the Lincoln general hospital at Washington.
    Among the engagements in which he participated were those at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, Spottsylvania, Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Gettysburg, distinguishing himself for valiant service at the last named battle.
    Mr. May was a natural musician and although one of the best performers on the violin in this section, his ability to read music was limited. Many a veteran can testify to the comfort they have received in and out of camp from the music he knew how to extract from his favorite violin, and since the war hardly a person within a radius of 20 miles of Leominster who indulges in dancing but has done so at one time or another to music furnished by Charlie May. A veteran remarked to this writer, Sunday, "The regimental reunions of the old 15th were never complete unless Comrad May ... fiddle.
    Mr. May attended the second inauguration of President Lincoln and also witnessed his assination, being in attendance at Ford's theater, Washington, at the time that deed was committed.
    He leaves one son, William F. May, besides the sister above mentioned. The funeral will be held Tuesday.
  • He was buried on 25 May 1898 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and it was reported as follows, from the "Fitchburg Sentinel," Wednesday, 25 May 1898
    Funeral of Charles F. May
    Draped with a silken American flagand surrounded by a profusion of beautiful flowers, the casket containing the remains of Charles F. May was viewed by his comrades of Post 53, G. A. R., and many relatives and friends, including delegations from Fitchburg and adjoining towns, as the last funeral rites over them took place at the home of his sister, Martha H. Russell on central street, Tuesday afternoon.
    Rev. G. M. Bodge spoke words of comfort to the bereaved sister and son, and Mrs. R. H. Safford and W. H. Upham rendered appropriate vocal selections: particularly so was their last song, "Gathering Home." The final exercises at the house included the G. A. R. burial service, impressively rendered by the officers of Charles H. Stevens Post. The burial took place in the family lot at Evergreen. The bearers were Francis E. Colburn, F. W. Polley, S. F. Maynard, Cornelius Wilder and H. A. French, all G. A. R. men, and each a fellow member of the deceased's in Co. A, 15th regiment, Mass. Volunteers.
    Among the more prominent floral tributes were: Mound of roses and immortelles, family; violin and bow, friends; basket of 55 pinks, neighbors; sicle of Easter lillies, D. of V; sickle, W. R. C; ivy wreath, Emma M. Wells and Mary A. Flagg; pinks, Napoleon Perrault and family; box of pansies, Mrs. A. S. Paton; smilax and roses, Mrs. F. A. Whitney; pinks and fersn, Charles E. Allen and daughter, Fitchburg; 55 tea roses and sickle of Easter lilies, Fitchburg friends.
  • On 5 Jul 1902 his only son, Willie F. May, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 24 unmarried of tuberculosis.
  • Last Edited: 18 Apr 2016

Family: Julia A. Wheeler b. Jul 1859

  • Willie F. May b. 1 Jun 1878, d. 5 Jul 1902

Fordyce May

b. 10 December 1837, d. 14 March 1880
  • Father: John May b. 26 Jul 1794, d. 26 Oct 1862
  • Mother: Mehitable Palmer b. between 1795 - 1796
  • Company: A
  • Fordyce May was born on 10 Dec 1837 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of John May and Mehitable Palmer.
  • Fordyce May was enumerated in the household of John May and Mehitable Palmer in the 1850 US Federal Census on 6 Sep 1850 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    John May, 55, farmer, $4500 in real estate, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Hitty P., 54
    James, 26
    Almira, 14
    ** Fordyce, 12
    Sally Palmer, 57.
  • Fordyce May was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census in 1860 at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, possibly as:
    Fordice May, age 22, b. MA, brick maker
    living in the household of
    Aaron BURBANK (needs clarification.)
  • In 1861 Fordyce was living at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Fordyce gave his occupation as farmer.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Fordyce mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a 1st Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 7 months and 2 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Fordyce May was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Fordyce May was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Fordyce May was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 26 Oct 1862 his father, John May, died at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 68.
  • On 1 Nov 1862 Fordyce was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 1 Jun 1863 Fordyce was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 1 Oct 1863 Fordyce was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • On 12 May 1864 Fordyce was wounded at Spotsylvania, Virginia.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Fordyce May was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Fordyce ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to expiration of term of service.

  • On 15 Mar 1871 Fordyce May, 33, married Etta Mary Russell, daughter of Nelson Russell and Sarah Chadwick, at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Fordyce May made application for a veteran's pension on 12 May 1879, and received certificate number 210714.
  • He died on 14 Mar 1880 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of typhoid fever. He was 42 years, 3 months and 4 days old.
  • He was buried in Mar 1880 at Howard Street Cemetery, Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Grave No. 1, Sect. 6, Lot 374.
  • On 12 Apr 1880 Etta Mary Russell received a pension to surviving family member based on Fordyce's service; his wife, received certificate number 197007.
  • His estate was probated in 1880 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He appeared on the Mortality Schedule of 31 May 1880 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Etta Mary Russell in the 1880 US Federal Census on 1 Jun 1880 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    May, M. Etta, 30, widow, farmer, b. ME (of ME parents)
    ---, Nancy E., 7, daur, b. MIN
    Eager, Nancy R., 58, boarder, widow, sews straw, b. ME.
  • Etta Mary May was enumerated as the widow of Fordyce May, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 18 May 1892 his daughter, Nanna Elizabeth May, died at Wilbraham, Hampden County, Massachusetts, at age 19 unmarried, of shock and hemerrhage, following puncture of uterus.
  • About in 1898 Fordyce's widow, Etta Mary Russell remarried John F. Hart.
  • Last Edited: 28 Aug 2012

Family: Etta Mary Russell b. between 1849 - 1850

  • Nanna Elizabeth May b. 17 Apr 1873, d. 18 May 1892
  • Florence H. May b. 20 Jan 1875, d. 5 Sep 1876
  • Herbert Fordyce May b. 22 Sep 1880, d. 29 Mar 1905

James E. May

b. 17 January 1829, d. 27 June 1880

Capt. James E. May.
  • Father: Simon May b. 1800, d. 13 Jul 1859
  • Mother: Elizabeth Crossman b. 1811, d. 13 Apr 1878
  • Company: B
  • Note: the middle initial "E" is not shown in his obituary and needs further documentation.
  • James E. May was born on 17 Jan 1829 at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of Simon May and Elizabeth Crossman.
  • James E. May married Mary Ann Porter.
  • James E. May was enumerated in the household of Simon May and Elizabeth Crossman in the 1850 US Federal Census on 11 Sep 1850 at Ashland, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Simon May, 50, laborer, b. Ireland
    Elizabeth, 39, b. Ireland
    Rebecca, 18, b. Nova Scotia
    Margaret, 16,
    Simon, 13, b. MA
    Thomas, 10, b. MA
    Mary E., 7, b. MA
    David, 4, b. MA
    Bridget Coil, 20, b. Ireland
    Eliza Dowds, 24, b. Ireland
    Ellen Lynch, 18, b. Ireland
    Robert Kennedy, 21, b. Ireland
    **James May, 22, b. Ireland
    Mary A., 19, b. Ireland (his wife)
    David, 1, b. MA
    Simon, 8/12, b. MA.
  • On 13 Jul 1859 his father, Simon May, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, "killed instantly in an accident on the railroad."
  • In 1861 James was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, James gave his occupation as wood turner.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a 1st Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 32 years, 5 months and 25 days old.
  • On 28 Oct 1862 James was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 30 Mar 1863 James was promoted to 1st Lieutenant.
  • On 10 Apr 1863 at "The Southbridge Journal", Worcester County, Massachusetts, James E. May was mentioned in an article listing commissions and officer promotions in the regiment, as well as which discharged or deceased officers they replaced.
  • On 12 Oct 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James E. May was mentioned as promoted.
  • On 22 Nov 1863 James was promoted to Captain.
  • In May 1864 James was wounded.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James E. May was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 22 Jun 1864 James was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia.
  • Daniel W. Freeman wrote a letter on 25 Jun 1864, mentioning James E. May, as follows: published in the Webster Times. (Click icon to read.)
  • On 27 Jul 1864 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to 20th MVI as absent Prisoner of War.

  • On 27 Jul 1864 James May appeared on the muster rolls of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a commissioned officer.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James E. May was mentioned in an article about the return of the regiment to Massachusetts.
  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, James also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company "E."
  • On 19 Aug 1864 his younger brother, Simon May, died at Weldon Railroad, Virginia, in action while serving with the 21st Massachusetts Infantry.
  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James E. May was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • On 21 Sep 1864 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, James E. May was among those Union officers listed as being confined in Libby Prison in Richmond.
  • On 5 Mar 1865, James was exchanged from prison.
  • On 8 Mar 1865 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, James E. May was listed among six hundred Union officers released from prison and having arrived in Annapolis on 5 March.
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 11 Mar 1865.
  • On 15 Mar 1865 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas J. Hastings, William James Coulter, and an unknown person , were mentioned in Volume 94 # 11
    More Exchanged Prisoners
    Four government steamers arrived at Annapolis from Wilmington, last Sunday, bringing six hundred released Union officers. Several thousand more prisoners are to follow immediately. The following Massachusetts officers are among the arrivals on Sunday:
    Capt. Joseph (sic) May, Lieut. W. J. Coulter, and Lieut. Thomas J. Hastings of the 15th regiment....
  • James was Colonel of the 10th Massachusetts after the close of the war.
  • Mary Ann Porter, his wife, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James E. May was enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 20 Jul 1870 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    May, James 39, wood turner, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    ---, Fannie, 18, works in wood turning shop
    ---, Flora, 15, works in wood turning shop
    ---, James Jr., 13
    ---, Charles, 11
    ---, Lincoln, 9
    Sibly, Addie M., 23, house keeper, b. ME (his future wife.)
  • On 5 Jun 1871 James E. May, 42, married Addie M. Sibley, daughter of Daniel Sibley and Abigail [--?--], at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • James and Mary's daughter, Florence May married J Robert Barnes.
  • James E. May died on 27 Jun 1880 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 51 years, 5 months and 10 days old.
  • An obituary for James E. May was published as follows: from the "Fitchburg Sentinel," Monday, 28 June 1880:
    Death of Col. James May
    Col. James May, formerly commander of the 10th regiment, M. V. M., and one of the most gallant officers who honored Fitchburg in the field during the late war, died about 2 l'clock, Sunday morning, at the residence of Mrs. William Francis on Oak street. He had been sick a little more than three weeks from paralysis of the brain which caused severe suffering although he was in a semi-unconscious state a considerable part of the time during his illness.
    Col. May was born at Roxbury, jan. 13, 1828. In the early part of his life he resided successively at Canton, Taunton, Easton in this state, Providence, R. I., and at Brooklyn, N.Y. He removed to Fitchburg some 30 years ago and worked at wood turning till the breaking out of the rebellion. Previous to the war he was for four or five years a member of the old fusiliers, then Co. B, 9th regiment, M. V. M. The company was mustered into the United States service for three years on the 12th of July, 1861, as Co. B, 15th regiment, May being at that time second sergeant.
    His conspicuous bravery in the field, with his other soldierly qualities, won for him rapid promotion. He was made first sergeant of the company early in 1862, promoted to second-lieutenant Oct. 28, '62, commissioned first-lieutenant, march 30, '63, and captain Nov. 22, '63. He was transferred to Company H, 20th regiment, July 28, 1864, and was mustered out of service March 11, 1865.
    During his long term of service Col. May participated in 32 engagements. He was injured by the concussion of a fragment of a shell in one battle and in an engagement before Petersburg he was taken prisoner and was the victim of rebel cruelty for about 10 months. With other prisoners he was placed at Charleston, S. C., under the fire of the federal batteries, the rebels hoping in this way to stop the bombardment of the city, then in progress from Gen. Gilmore's batteries.
    After the war his fondness for military life led him to accept positions in the volunteer militia. He was for a time second lieutenant of the Washington Guards. On the formation of the Third Brigade in 1867 he was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 10th regiment, and in 1869 when Colonel Chamberlain was made Brigadier-General, Col. May was promoted to colonel of the regiment, a position which he held till 1875. Since the war he has resided at Miller's Falls, Cambridgeport and at Newburyport. He has made some valuable improvements in lathes and probably overtaxed his brain, though the injury received on the battlefield may have caused a diseased condition of the organ. For several years he has suffered intensely at times from neuralgia in his head.
    Col. May was twice married and his second wife survives him. He also leaves seven children, five sons and two daughters. The funeral willbe attended at the residence of Mrs. Francis on Tuesday at 2 p.m.
  • He was buried on 30 Jun 1880 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Div. 1, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Hemlock Path, and it was reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel, Wednesday, 30 June 1880:
    Funeral of Col. James May
    The funeral of Col. James May was attended at the residence of Mrs. William Francis on Oak street, Tuesday afternoon, Rev. R. S. Kellerman conducting the services. The members of E. V. Sumner Post 19, G. A. R., showed their respect for their late comrade by attending the funeral in a body and the two military companies with the Fitchburg Band performed the duty of escort.
    The services at the house commenced with singing "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," by a quartette consisting of J. Warren White, Mrs. H. S. Derby, Miss Minnie J. Kingsbury and George W. Luke. Rev. R. S. Kellerman read a part of the 9th chapter of John and addressed consoling words to the mourning friends, speaking especially of the hope of immortality, and offered prayer. The services at the house closed with singing, "Abide with me."
    The body was enclosed in a black walnut casket and a wwreath rested on the casket. The pall bearers were Gen. John W. Kimball, Sergt. Henry A. Spooner, Corporals George T. Daniels and Henry L. Sheldon, and Privates Charles K. Griswold and C. C. Litch. All the pall bearers were members of the old Fusiliers with the deceased before the war, and the first five left Fitchberg with him, 19 years ago last Monday for the scenes of the camp and field. The procession moved in the following order, the military marching with arms reversed and the band playing dirges:
    Fitchburg Band, 21 pieces, W. S. Russell, leader
    Washington Guards, 26 men, Capt. John H. Kirby, commanding.
    Fitchburg Fusiliers, 37 men, Capt George E. Goodrich, commanding
    E. V. Sumner Post 19, G. A. R., 31 men, John F. Bruce commanding
    Hearse.
    Family friends in carriages.
    The coffin was covered with the American flag. The procession moved from Oak street, through Holt, Summer, Main, Pre?? and Laurel streets to the tomb. The impressive burial service of the Gand Army was conducted by Chaplain Oliver, after which the remains were temporarily deposited in the tomb. The military then fird three vollys over the tomb which completed the funeral services.
  • Addie M. May, his wife, was appointed as administrator of his estate according to the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • On 21 Apr 1886 Addie M. Sibley received a pension to surviving family member based on James's service; his wife, received certificate number 234623.
  • On 25 Nov 1892 John White Kimball gave his eye-witness account of the Battle of Ball's Bluff to the Boston Journal, and it was reprinted in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • Last Edited: 29 May 2017

Family 1: Mary Ann Porter b. 1830

  • David May b. 1848
  • Simon May b. 11 Apr 1850, d. 5 Mar 1851
  • Frances Matilda May b. 7 Jan 1853, d. 22 Oct 1883
  • Florence May b. 15 Apr 1855, d. 3 Jul 1909
  • James Henry May b. 17 May 1857, d. 1933
  • Charles Hurlbert May b. 28 Feb 1859, d. 2 Jun 1914
  • Lincoln Scott May b. 16 Jul 1861, d. 25 Oct 1930

Family 2: Addie M. Sibley b. between 1843 - 1844

  • Dannie Libbey May b. 1873, d. 11 Jan 1893

Benjamin B. Mayberry

b. 16 March 1825, d. 3 January 1892
  • Father: Francis Mayberry b. 1785
  • Mother: Susanna Stuart b. 1790
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Benjamin B. Mayberry was born on 16 Mar 1825 at Windham, Cumberland County, Maine, son of Francis Mayberry and Susanna Stuart.
  • In 1857 Benjamin B. Mayberry was apothecary, according to his marriage record.
  • On 28 Mar 1857 Benjamin B. Mayberry, 32, married Eliza Pillsberry, 33, daughter of James Linscott and Mary Huntress, at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Benjamin gave his occupation as Trader.
  • In 1861 Benjamin was living at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting 30 Nov 1861, Benjamin also served in the 3rd Cavalry Regiment Massachusetts, Company M.
  • He ended his service with the 3rd Cavalry in Dec 1861.

  • On 4 Mar 1862 Benjamin B. Mayberry mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 36 years, 11 months and 16 days old.
  • On 23 Nov 1862 Benjamin ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters at Washington, DC, by discharge for disability.

  • Starting 29 Dec 1863, Benjamin also served in the 15th Battery Light Artillery Massachusetts, having received a bonus of $325.
  • He ended his service with with the expiration of his term of service on 4 Aug 1865.
  • He and Eliza Linscott were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 10 Jun 1870 at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Mayberry, Benj. B., 45, fancy goods store, b. ME
    ---, Eliza, 45, b. ME
    ---, Lawrence J., (Pillsbury) 20, painter, b. ME
    ---, Frank W., 12, b. MA
    ---, Fred N., 10, b. MA.
  • Benjamin B. Mayberry was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Gorham, Cumberland County, Maine, as having served in the 1st Co. Andrews Sharpshooters.
  • He made application at Maine for a veteran's pension on 11 Aug 1890, and received certificate number 685091.
  • He died on 3 Jan 1892 at Little Falls, Cumberland County, Maine. He was 66 years, 9 months and 18 days old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1892 at Hillside Cemetery, Gorham, Cumberland County, Maine.
  • On 10 Feb 1892 Eliza Linscott received a pension to surviving family member in Maine based on Benjamin's service; his wife received certificate number 344853.
  • Eliza, his wife, outlived Benjamin and died on 9 Mar 1906 at Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 82.
  • Last Edited: 26 Apr 2016

Family: Eliza Linscott b. 6 Nov 1823, d. 9 Mar 1906

  • Franklin W. Mayberry b. 15 Dec 1857, d. 12 Jun 1908
  • Fred N. Mayberry b. 1859, d. 12 Apr 1906

Henry Mayer

b. between 1832 and 1833
  • Company: G
  • Henry Mayer was born between 1832 - 1833 at Germany.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Henry gave his occupation as cook.
  • In 1863 Henry was living at Germany.
  • He was wounded on 2 Jul 1863 at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, (Note: this may be a clerical error, since he did not join the unit until the end of this month.)

  • On 25 Jul 1863 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a substitute for a drafted man, being credited to the quota of Barre, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 15 May 1864 Henry was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Virginia.
  • On 15 Jun 1864, at Washington, DC, Henry was in hospital.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry while a prisoner.

  • He ended his service with the 20th Massachusetts being mustered out as a prisoner.
  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2012

Henry Mayers

b. between 1817 and 1818
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Henry Mayers was born between 1817 - 1818.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Henry gave his occupation as Painter.
  • In 1862 Henry was living at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 11 Sep 1862 Henry Mayers mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters.
  • On 26 Jan 1864 Henry ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by transfer.

  • Starting 26 Jan 1864, Henry also served in the Company 118th, 2nd Battn Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps as by mustering out.
  • He ended his service with Company 118th, 2nd Battn Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps by mustering out on 16 Nov 1864.
  • Last Edited: 6 Jan 2014

Sylvender F. Maynard

b. 12 October 1841, d. 9 October 1908

Corp. Sylvender F. Maynard
  • Father: Edmund Maynard b. 16 May 1817, d. 26 Jun 1889
  • Mother: Mary M. Alexander b. 25 Sep 1811, d. 9 Apr 1880
  • Company: A
  • Sylvender F. Maynard was born on 12 Oct 1841 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Edmund Maynard and Mary M. Alexander.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard was enumerated in the household of Edmund Maynard and Mary M. Alexander in the 1850 US Federal Census on 14 Sep 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Edmund Maynard, 33, basket maker, b. MA
    Mary M., 39, b. NH
    **Sylvander F., 8, b. MA
    Ada E., 11, b. MA
    Emma A., 2, b. MA
    (female), 1/12, b. MA.
  • In 1861 Sylvender was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Sylvender gave his occupation as basket maker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Sylvender mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Corporal, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years and 9 months old.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard and William Maynard, uncle and nephew, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co. A.
  • On 29 Jun 1862 Sylvender was taken prisoner at Savage's Station, Virginia, and confined on Belle Island.
  • On 29 Jun 1862 Sylvender was wounded on the thigh.
  • On 5 Aug 1862, Sylvender was exchanged from prison.
  • On 1 Sep 1863 Sylvender ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the V. R. C.

  • Starting 9 Oct 1863, Sylvender also served in the 65th Company, 2nd Batallion, Veterans' Reserve Corps.
  • He ended his service on 15 Jul 1864.
  • On 21 Dec 1866 Sylvender F. Maynard, 25, married Emily F. Stevens, 25, daughter of Abel S. Stevens and Lucy Wheeler Fletcher, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard and Emily F. Stevens were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 15 Jul 1870 at Boeuf, Franklin County, Missouri, as:
    Maynard, S. F. 28, school teacher, b. MA
    ---, E. F., 28, b. MA
    ---, Hattie F., 1/12, b. Missouri in May.
  • On 23 Oct 1876 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sylvender F. Maynard was reported present at the 10th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts in an article in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • Sylvender had his portrait made. (click icon to view.)
  • Before their deaths, his parents also visited the photographer.
  • He and Emily F. Stevens were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Maynard, Sylvender, 38, bookkeeper, b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Emily, 38, wife
    ---, Hattie F., 10, daur
    ---, George P., 8, son.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in Jun 1880, and received certificate number 601177.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A.
  • In 1895, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sylvender was Commander of the C. H. Stevens G. A. R. Post 53.
  • In Aug 1895, Sylvender was journeying to Louisville for the G. A. R. encampment, according to the Fitchburg Daily Sentinel, 30 August 1895.
  • On 16 Jun 1897 Sylvender and Emily's daughter, Hattie F. Maynard married Dennis N. Vincellette at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard was a pall bearer at the burial of Charles Franklin May on 25 May 1898 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard and Emily F. Stevens were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 11 Jun 1900 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Sylvender F. Maynard, a member of Charles H. Stevens post, G. A. R., was a pall bearer at the burial of Francis Edwin Colburn in Apr 1901 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Oct 1902 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sylvender F. Maynard attended 36th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment Association.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sylvander F. Maynard attended the 37th annual regimental reunion with some eighty other veterans.
  • On 3 Jan 1905 his son, George Putnam Maynard, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 32 unmarried, of cerebral hemorrhage.
  • On 8 Jul 1905 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sylvender was mentioned as being "afflicted with Bright's disease."
  • On 10 Aug 1905 Emily F. Stevens, his wife, died at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 64.
  • On 21 Oct 1907 at Grand Army Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts, Sylvender F. Maynard attended the 41st annual regimental reunion and banquet on the 46th anniversary of the Battle of Ball's Bluff, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel the following day.
  • An obituary for Sylvender F. Maynard was published as follows: from the "Fitchburg Sentinel," Friday, 9 Oct 1908:
    Death of Civil War Veteran.
    The death of Sylvander F. Maynard, one of the best known and most highly respected members of Charles H. Stevens post, G. A. R., died, this morning at 5 o'clock, at the home of his sister, Mrs. Charles F. Campbell, 171 North Main street, where he has been confined to his bed for nearly two weeks with Bright's disease. Mr. Maynard has been in failing health for over a year, but it was not until recently that his condition became serious.
    He was a native of Leominster, being born Oct. 12, 1841, and spending all his life here, with the exception of the time he spent in the service of his country during the Civil War. He was a past commander of Charles H. Stevens post, G. A. R., and a member of Wilder lodge, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Maynard entered the service at Worcester, July 12, 1861, and was discharged as a private in Co. A, 15th Massachusetts regiment, but was later transferred to the 65th Co. 2d Battalion Veteran Reserve corps, in which he served until the expiration of his time.
    He served with distinction during his term of service and took part in the following battles: Balls Bluffs (sic), Yorktown, West Point, Va., Fair Oaks and all the skirmishes up to and including the battle of Savage Station. He was appointed corporal in August 1863, He was wounded, June 29, 1862, and was confined in the hospital at Alexandria until Sept. 3, 1862, and was then transferred to the Harwood hospital at Washington, where he remained until Oct. 6, 1862.
    One of the most severe injuries which he received during his service but one which is not mentioned in his war record at Grand Army hall, was received when with a company of his corps he was detailed to cut down a lot of trees in the line of march. While engaged in this work he was struck by a falling tree, sustaining injuries which incapacitated him for a long time, and which made themselves felt during his later years.
    On the morning after the battle of Savage Station, Mr. Maynard was taken prisoner by the rebel cavalry and was detained at the prison at Castle Thunder until July 13, 1862, when he was transferred to the Belle Island prison, where he suffered the usual tortures of the Southern prisons. In August, 1862, he was exchanged in company with 3000 other Northern prisoners. From Belle Island, the Union prisoners were forced to march 18 miles in a wweakened condition on a hot day. On the road Mr. Maynard saw many of his companions fall by the road side, unable to keep up with the march.
    Mr. Maynard joined Charles H. Stevens post soon after it was instituted and has since been one of the most active workers in its welfare. It is doubtful if there was another member of the post who was more beloved by his comrades and by the members of the auxiliary organizations of the post.
    He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Charles F. Campbell, of this town, withwhom he has made his home for some time, and Mrs. Ada Bond of Worcester; a brother, Wilbur N. Maynard of this town, and one daughter, Mrs. Hattie Vincellette of Watertown. The arrangements for the funeral had not been completed this morning.
  • He died on 9 Oct 1908 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 66 years, 11 months and 27 days old.
  • He was buried on 11 Oct 1908 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and it was reported in the "Fitchburg Sentinel," Monday, 12 October 1908:
    Funeral of Sylvander F. Maynard.
    The funeral of Sylvander F. Maynard, wöhich was held, Sunday afternoon, at the Unitarian church at 2 o'clock, was attended by relatives and friends in such numbers that the large auditorium was taxed to its limits. Charles H. Stevens post, G. A. R., of which Mr. maynard was a member, was in charge of the services, and their late comrade was buried with the full ritual of the Grand Army.
    There were present at the funeral officially, large delegations from Charles H. Stevens post, E. A. Bennett camp, Sons of Veterans, Olive A. Logan tent, Daughters of Veterans and Charles H. Stevens Relief corps. Friends and relatives were alo presesnt in large numbers from Fitchburg, Watertown, Clinton and Boston.
    The members of the Grand Army formed at their hall on Water Street and marched to the home of Mrs. Campbell, North Main street, his late home. At the home, prayers were read by Rev. Frederick J. Gauld. The G. A. R. then headed the funeral cortege to the church, where Mr. Gauld was assisted in the services by Rev. George R. Baker, pastor of the Baptist church in the ceremonies. There was special music by the Unitarian church choir.
    After the services, the members of Charles H. Stevens post preceded the funeral to Evergreen cemetery, where the Grand Army ritual was used.
    The bearers were these members of Charles H. Stevens post: A. L. Clarke, G. S. Allen, C. C. Chapelle and J. J. Railey.
  • Credits: Portrait from "Leominster: Historical and Picturesque", by William A. Emerson, 1888.
  • Last Edited: 20 Aug 2016

Family: Emily F. Stevens b. 13 Jul 1841, d. 10 Aug 1905

  • Hattie F. Maynard b. May 1870, d. 11 Nov 1944
  • George Putnam Maynard b. 26 Jan 1872, d. 3 Jan 1905

Waldo Barrett Maynard

b. 16 March 1838, d. 24 September 1862
  • Father: William Maynard b. 27 Oct 1812, d. 7 Oct 1889
  • Mother: Sarah Moore Nurse b. 26 Sep 1814, d. 12 Apr 1889
  • Company: C
  • Waldo Barrett Maynard was born on 16 Mar 1838 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of William Maynard and Sarah Moore Nurse.
  • Waldo Barrett Maynard was enumerated in the household of William Maynard and Sarah Moore Nurse in the 1850 US Federal Census on 6 Aug 1850 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Wm. Maynard, 37, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    Sarah M., 34
    **Waldo B., 12
    Charlotte Ann, 7
    Caleb A., 3
    Samuel F., 7
    Wm. A., 1
    Betsey Bathrick, 62
    John Shamb, 40, laborer, b. Canada.
  • Before 1861 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Waldo Barrett Maynard as a resident, was a member of "The Clinton Guards."
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Waldo gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Waldo was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Waldo Barrett Maynard and Charles Edward Warren, friends, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Company C.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Waldo mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 3 months and 26 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Waldo was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • He died on 24 Sep 1862 at Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland, unmarried, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam. He was 24 years, 6 months and 8 days old.
  • Charles, his friend, outlived Waldo and died on 2 Oct 1862 at Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland, unmarried, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam, and it was registered in Northboro, MA at age 19.
  • He was buried on 16 Dec 1862 at Howard Street Cemetery, Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At Unitarian Church, Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Waldo Barrett Maynard and Charles Edward Warren were buried in a
    Double Funeral: Their bodies were brought home at the expense of the town and buried on the same day from the Unitarian Church. It was an impressive service and made a deep impression on those who witnessed it.
    These boys were schoolmates; their fathers before them were schoolmates; they enlisted at the same time, were wounded in the same battle, died only one week apart, their bodies were brought home together and were buried on the same day. (History of Northborough.)
  • On 17 Sep 1870 Waldo Barrett Maynard was included on the Civil War memorial at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1896, Waldo was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts" noted as "name on rolls as of Northboro."
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Waldo B. Maynard was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 11 Apr 2016