Patrick Bresnahan

b. 1825, d. 18 May 1887
  • Company: K
  • Patrick Bresnahan was born about in 1825 at County Kerry, Ireland.
  • Patrick Bresnahan married Mary Smith, daughter of Robert Smith and Ellen [--?--].
  • In 1862 Patrick was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Patrick gave his occupation as laborer.

  • On 31 Jul 1862 Patrick mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 37 years old.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Patrick Bresnahan was reported as missing at Gettysburg.
  • On 5 Jan 1864 Patrick ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 3 Oct 1868, and received certificate 103350.
  • On 24 Jun 1878 Patrick and Mary's son, James Bresnahan married Victoria Moran at Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Patrick Bresnahan and Mary Smith were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1880 at Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Breslahan (sic), Patrick, 60, laborer, b. Ireland
    ---, Mary, 58, wife, b. Ireland
    ---, Lizzie, 19, daur, cloth trimmer, b. RI
    ---, Caroline, 28, daur, cotton weaver, b. VT.
  • Patrick Bresnahan died on 18 May 1887. He was 62 years old.
  • He was buried in May 1887 at Saint Patrick's Cemetery, Cumberland, Providence County, Rhode Island, where his wife would later join him.
  • On 20 Jun 1887 Mary Smith received a pension to surviving family member in Rhode Island based on Patrick's service; his wife, received certificate number xxx.xxx (illegible.)
  • Mary, his wife, outlived Patrick and died on 23 Dec 1895 at Cumberland, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2016

Family: Mary Smith b. 1827, d. 23 Dec 1895

  • Caroline Bresnahan b. May 1852, d. 28 Sep 1913
  • James Bresnahan b. 1859, d. 16 Feb 1899
  • Thomas Bresnahan b. 1860, d. 5 Jul 1914
  • Elizabeth C. Bresnahan b. Apr 1867, d. 28 May 1904

William Henry Harrison Brewer

b. 17 January 1841, d. 7 February 1913
  • Father: Lysander Brewer b. 25 Aug 1811, d. 15 Jun 1901
  • Mother: Emely Newcomb b. 7 Jul 1818, d. 13 Jan 1844
  • Company: F
  • William Henry Harrison Brewer was born on 17 Jan 1841 at Spencer, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Lysander Brewer and Emely Newcomb.
  • On 13 Jan 1844 his mother, Emely Newcomb, died at age 25.
  • On 18 Nov 1845 William's widowed father, Lysander Brewer, remarried to Anna Maria Newcomb.
  • On 16 Jul 1846 his step-mother, Anna Maria Newcomb, died at age 20.
  • On 25 Mar 1856 William's widowed father, Lysander Brewer, remarried to Sarah C. Ellis at Paxton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a third marriage for him and the second for her.
  • William Henry Harrison Brewer was enumerated in the household of Lysander Brewer and Sarah C. Duncan in the 1860 US Federal Census in Jun 1860 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Lysander Brewer, 48, bootmaker, b. MA (as were all)
    Sarah C., 28 (another step-mother)
    Mason D., 2
    **Harrison, 19, boot maker.
  • William Henry Harrison Brewer married Unknown Wife [--?--].
  • In 1861 William was living at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, William gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 20 years, 5 months and 25 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Henry Harrison Brewer was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Henry Harrison Brewer was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. H. Brewer was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Dec 1862 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by desertion according to the 1870 roster and the MASSCW, however his 1890 Vet enumeration makes no mention. (There is NO mention of desertion in the North Brookfield Civil War history, although it is mentioned in connection with some others included in the history.)

  • Before 1873 Unknown Wife [--?--], his wife, died apparently.
  • On 14 Apr 1873 William Henry Harrison Brewer, 32, married Lizzie Hill, 29, daughter of Elbridge Hill and Melona Smith, at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, his second marriage, and her first.
  • William Henry Harrison Brewer and Elizabeth Hill were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1880 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he Works In a Shoe Factory. There are no children in the household.
  • In 1886 William was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. F, saying that he was taken prisoner at Ball's Bluff and never returned to the regiment after his parole.
  • On 14 May 1893 Elizabeth Hill, his wife, died at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 49.
  • William Henry Harrison Brewer was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 28 Apr 1910 at The Town Farm, North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as William Brewer, inmate, 69, widower, b. MA, with no occupation.
  • He died on 7 Feb 1913 at Almshouse, North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of Bright's disease. He was 72 years and 21 days old.
  • He was buried on 8 Feb 1913 at Walnut Grove Cemetery, North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 21 Mar 2015

Family 1: Unknown Wife [--?--] d. before 1873

Family 2: Elizabeth Hill b. 12 Jun 1843, d. 14 May 1893

Cornelius Winters Briggs

b. 1 November 1843, d. 9 July 1920
  • Father: Ebenezer Briggs b. 1811, d. before 1870
  • Mother: Eleanor Patch Warren b. 1 Apr 1811, d. 1 Jul 1891
  • Company: I
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs was born on 1 Nov 1843 at Willimantic, Windham County, Connecticut, son of Ebenezer Briggs and Eleanor Patch Warren.
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs was enumerated in the household of Ebenezer Briggs and Eleanor Patch Warren in the 1850 US Federal Census on 27 Jul 1850 at Tiverton, Newport County, Rhode Island, as:
    Ebenezer Briggs, 45, confectioner, b. RI
    Eleanor P., 39, b. MA
    Reuben D., 20, sailor, b. NY
    Henry, 17, actor, b. VT
    Ebenezer, 15, miner, b. VT
    Mary, 15, b. CT
    Charles W., 14, b. VT
    **Cornelins W., 8, b. CT
    **Lucius H., 7, b. RI
    Caroline, 4, b. VT.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Cornelius gave his occupation as jeweler.

  • On 15 May 1861 Cornelius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 17 years, 6 months and 14 days old.
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs and Lucius H. Briggs, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company I.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Cornelius Winters Briggs was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Cornelius was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, as a Sergeant.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 his brother, Lucius H. Briggs, died at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, killed in action.
  • On 1 Oct 1862 Francis Carpenter, having visited the battlefield, wrote a letter to the Webster Times detailing the status of many men after the Battle of Antietam.
  • On 24 May 1863 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius deserted.
  • On 7 Mar 1864 Cornelius ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability, having been gained from desertion.

  • In 1864 Cornelius Winters Briggs was a mechanic.
  • On 25 Dec 1864 Cornelius W. Briggs, 21, married Lucy L. Wallace, 20, daughter of Church Wallace and Sophronia [--?--], at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs made application for a veteran's pension on 29 Sep 1865, and received certificate number 68113.
  • He and Lucy L. Wallace were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 1 Jul 1870 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 23 Oct 1876 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius Winters Briggs was reported present at the 10th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts in an article in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • He and Lucy L. Wallace were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 1 Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Briggs, Cornelins W., 37, iron machinery, b. CT (of CT parents)
    ---, Lucy L., 35, wife, b. VT
    ---, Lucius W., 13, son, b. MA
    ---, L. Winnie, 11, daur, b. MA
    (in same house)
    Briggs, Eleanor P., 69, widow, b. CT.
  • On 21 Oct 1882 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius Winters Briggs attended the 16th annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 20 Oct 1883 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cornelius Winters Briggs attended the 17th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 110 other veterans of the regiment. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 18 Jun 1888 Cornelius and Lucy's daughter, Lunetta Winifred Briggs married George A. Green at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs and Lucy L. Wallace were separated apparantly.
  • Cornelius Winters Briggs emigrated on 28 Feb 1890 to Montreal, Canada.
  • He was not enumerated in the household of Lucius Wallace Briggs and Lillian V. Alton in the 1900 US Federal Census on 14 Jun 1900 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with his family as:
    Briggs, Lucius, head, b. Aug 1866 (his son)
    ---, Lillian C., wife, b. Aug 1865
    ---, Janet W., dau, b. Nov 1884
    ---, Katherine B., dau, b. Aug 1896
    ---, Stuart W., son, b. Oct 1897
    Alton, Amos C., fat-in-law, b. Jan 1825
    ---, Janet, mor-in-law, b. Jan 1835
    (nextdoor to)
    Green, George, head, b. Nov 1864
    ---, Winifred L., wife, b. Aug 1868 (his daughter)
    ---, Donald W., son, b. Aug 1893
    Briggs, Lucy L., mor-in-law, b. Nov 1844, 55, widow, both her children still living, b. VT (as were her parents), dressmaker.
  • On 4 Jul 1907 Cornelius Winters Briggs was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • He was enumerated in the 1911 Canadian census in 1911 at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, as a roomer, age 68, b. CT, a machinist.
  • He died on 9 Jul 1920 at Montreal, Canada. He was 76 years, 8 months and 8 days old.
  • He was buried in Jul 1920 at Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, Canada.
  • On 7 Sep 1922 Lucy L. Wallace received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Cornelius's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 924563.
  • Cornelius's wife, Lucy L. Wallace, died and was buried in Sep 1924 at Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, section 113, with her daughter at age 79 years and 9 months.
  • Last Edited: 29 Jul 2016

Family: Lucy L. Wallace b. 16 Nov 1844, d. 6 Sep 1924

  • Lucius Wallace Briggs b. 26 Aug 1866, d. 10 Sep 1940
  • Lunetta Winifred Briggs b. 26 Aug 1868, d. 15 Dec 1930

Lucius H. Briggs

b. between 1842 and 1843, d. 17 September 1862

Lucius H. Briggs
  • Father: Ebenezer Briggs b. 1811, d. before 1870
  • Mother: Eleanor Patch Warren b. 1 Apr 1811, d. 1 Jul 1891
  • Company: I
  • Lucius H. Briggs was born between 1842 - 1843 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, son of Ebenezer Briggs and Eleanor Patch Warren.
  • Lucius H. Briggs was enumerated in the household of Ebenezer Briggs and Eleanor Patch Warren in the 1850 US Federal Census on 27 Jul 1850 at Tiverton, Newport County, Rhode Island, as:
    Ebenezer Briggs, 45, confectioner, b. RI
    Eleanor P., 39, b. MA
    Reuben D., 20, sailor, b. NY
    Henry, 17, actor, b. VT
    Ebenezer, 15, miner, b. VT
    Mary, 15, b. CT
    Charles W., 14, b. VT
    **Cornelins W., 8, b. CT
    **Lucius H., 7, b. RI
    Caroline, 4, b. VT.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Lucius gave his occupation as printer.
  • In 1861 Lucius was living at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 15 May 1861 Lucius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Lucius H. Briggs and Cornelius Winters Briggs, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company I.
  • Lucius had his photo taken in uniform.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Lucius H. Briggs was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 14 Jun 1862 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, the following:
    We have received a brief note from Lucius H. Briggs, a Webster volunteer who was in the engagement at Fair Oaks on the 30th ult., and 1st inst. He mentions the following casualties in Company I; Edward Lannegan, wounded in neck and face; John McGuire, foot and ankle; Milo S. Converse, leg and hand; Alpheus Remick, hand. There were other slight flesh wounds, but none sufficiently serious to be worthy of mention. None of the company was killed. The letter states that there were no displays of cowardice, but every man stood at his post, and performed his duty with a promptness and alacrity worthy of praise.
  • On 13 Sep 1862 at Munson's Hill, Virginia, Lucius wrote a letter to the Webster Weekly Times, (Volume IV # 27), which was then published on the 13th of the month. It was his last communication.
    ARMY CORRESPONDENCE
    The following letter from Lucius H. Briggs , gives a detailed account of the experiences of Company I, 15th Regiment, (from this place) since they left Harrison Landing:
    To the Editor of the Webster Times
    Camp near Munson’s Hill, Va.
    Sept. 8th, 1862
    I have know a few spare moments, for the first time in two weeks. I am well, but somewhat exhausted from long and heavy marches and loss of sleep, having enjoyed but one whole nights rest in a fortnight. I propose giving you an account of our movements since leaving Harrisons Landing, leaving the reports of skirmishes and engagements for the daily newspaper reporters to describe.
    We left Harrison’s Landing at five o’clock on Thursday, August 14th, and marched the whole of three days and three nights, only stopping occasionally for a short interval of rest. Company I was detailed for the team guards, to give aid in case the baggage train should be molested by the rebels. Company G, of the first Minnesota Regiment , was ahead of the Division wagons, and our company in the rear.
    We started about twelve hours before the troops, and during the four days we were on the march we traveled seventy-six miles. The boys often became exhausted during the day, and would fall out of the ranks, but they always came up at night. We were foraging much of the time, and made free with whatever in the way of poultry, beef or pork, we could lay hands on.
    We arrived at Fortress Monroe on the 18th of August, stopped there a few days, and were ordered to report at Newport News, to our regiment, which had just arrived there. We remained there two days, then went on board a transport, for Alexandria. This was the ocean steamer “Mississippi”, and she took on board 2300 men ,nearly our whole brigade.
    Arrived at Alexandria, Company I was detailed to unload the boat. While we were on board our cooking was done in great style. Our meat, coffee, tea, ect. were cooked by steam. The coffee was made in kettles capable of holding one hundred gallons each; and the meat in kegs or casks. For drink we had fresh water condensed from sea water, and I assure you we were glad to go on shore at last and drink from wells and springs, for the condensed water was anything but palatable. Our quarters on board were uncomfortable, about four or five men being crowded into a space none to large to well accommodate one person. The scenery upon both banks of the Potomac is beautifully diversified, and would time permit I would give you an interesting description of what I observed during the trip.
    As soon as the transport was unloaded, Company I marched through the city to our Regiment, three miles distant. There we stopped overnight, and next day we all left for Chain Bridge. Here we remained but a few hours, being suddenly ordered to pack up and be off. We soon found ourselves on the road to Centreville in which direction we had heard firing all day. Next morning we reached Centreville, after a wearysome march. From the time we reached Alexandria until now we had not tasted meat, crackers being our only food.
    We remained at Centreville a day and a night, and next morning had orders to be ready to march again. Here we met the 21st Mass. regiment and we were sorry that we were unable to see the Webster boys in that Regiment. We left that night at six o’clock in a drenching rain, and commenced our retreat through mud and water. It was a hard night. the cause of our retreat was the fact that Stonewall Jackson was trying to get in our rear. It was conducted in good order, our brigade and division being in the rear. We had not left Fairfax, five miles from Centreville, when the rebels opened fire on us with their artillery. They fired railroad iron at us, but did us no harm.
    After leaving Fairfax, we were drawn up in line of battle at a fork of two roads, the 15th on the left, and Company H, Capt. Bartlett, and R.I. Sharpshooters, were detailed to go out in front and act as pickets or skirmishers. A small engagement followed, in which our Minnesota regiment sent the rebels skedaddling. We then went on without further molestation, and reached a point within about two miles of Chain Bridge at 12 o’clock, having marched fifteen miles in six hours.
    We left the last named locality yesterday morning, and arrived here in the afternoon, safe and sound, where we expect to remain for some time. Last night we received the intelligence that Gen. McClellan had been appointed Lieutenant Commander in Chief, and the news occasioned wild rejoicing all through our camp.
    The recruits sent to us from home arrived and met us at Fortress Monroe. we were heartily glad to receive them, as soldiers as well as citizens. The paroled prisoners have not reported here yet.
    We are glad to hear that Webster is not backward in doing her duty. She has done well, and we of the old Company here, if we live to tread the native town again , intend to merit the same plaudit from our friends at home.
    Hastily Yours
    Lucius H. Briggs
    Company I, 15th Mass. Regiment.
  • He died on 17 Sep 1862 at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, killed in action.
  • He was buried in 1862 at Antietam National Cemetery, Sharpsburg, Maryland, in an unmarked grave.
  • An obituary for Lucius H. Briggs was published on 27 Sep 1862 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: (Vol # 4 # 29)
    Obituary, by J. A. Spaulding, Editor
    Killed in battle, near Sharpsburg Md., on Wednsday Sept 17 1862, Lucius H. Briggs. Private in Company I, 15th Reg. Mass. Volunteers, aged 18 years, 11 months, 18 days.
    In the official list of killed during the late battle in Maryland, appears the name above mentioned. We feel it a duty to make more than a passing notice of the death of this young man.
    The opening of the rebellion eighteen months ago, found Lucius H Briggs an apprentice in this office. From day to day he read the thrilling accounts of rebel insults to the national flag, and from day to day we could see that the burning desire increased within him to aid in some way in crushing the enemies of his country. He frequently expressed his desire to enlist, but we advised him on account of his youthful age to wait untill the demand for men should be greater. Early in May, 1861 an effort was made to raise a company of Webster Volunteers; and, unable to let slip such an opportunity , this young man decided to join any company which might be formed here. A month later found him and some sixty of his comrades banded together as the nucleus of the Company which was afterwards known as the “ Slater Guards “. Through the long summer months the boys drilled and marched, disapointed often about going into camp as a Company, untill finally the full number of one hundred and one men was raised and mustered into Camp Scott, at Worcester, as Company I, of the Fifteenth Regiment._ Here we frequently heard from Lucius. He was full of military ardor, and counted the days untill the order should come to leave for the seat of the war. It came soon enough. On the 8th day of the following August the Regiment took their final departure, bearing with them the condidence and loving remembrance of many friends. Of the experiences of Company I since that time the public are informed. Our young friend shared them all; never off duty, never tardy, always ready for fatigue or fight, and never expecting to leave his company untill peace should be conquered or death should take him away.
    From time to time we have received letters from our friend. Many of them we have published. Such our readers will remember. They will remember how squarely he stood on all matters of national honor and national pride. They will remember how he admired and extolled the , true soldier patriot. They will remember his feeling announcement of the death of young Bigelow--- how he was “ proud to speak of him as a true soldier and lover of his country.” They will remember his last letter, giving a truthfull description of the retreat from the Peninsula, and stating how much he would rather announce a battle than a retreat.These letters, and many kind wishes and tender allusions which they contained, served to refresh the memory concerning the qualities of our young friend. He was connected with this office for a year and a half, and during all that time he never gave us occasion to speak harshly or reprovingly to him. He studied our pleasure; he was anxious to know his duty, and ever ready to perform it. We parted from him reluctantly, as from a friend, and we have watched his career with more than ordinary interest. We have been gratified to know that he was faithful upon the battlefield and in camp, as he was faithful here; that through hardships and dangers which would have discouraged ordinary persons of his age, his devotion to the cause of country was never less, his ardor never dampened.

    We are proud to have sent from this office so worthy a representative,--- asWebster may well be proud of him as among the truest of her martyred sons. And we doubt not that, could it be known what were his last emotions as he lay dying upon the bloodstained field, we should have abundant reason to believe that his patriotism was strongest at the latest breath.
    We shall ever hold the memory of this young man as sacred, and mourn his loss as that of a near friend. Peace to his ashes! Where they rest with hundreds of his brave comrades, upon the banks of the Antietam. May it be that his spirit was prepared and has ascended to dwell forever with the Great Commander.
    Lucius B. Briggs was the only son of a widowed mother, who resides in this place in the companionship of an only daughter. We would touch lightly upon the feelings of these mourning friends. They have our hearty sympathy in their loss. The sacrifice is indeed great, the cup of affliction indeed bitter. But let us hope that it will not be for naught. And if ever again the Stars and Stripes shall again wave over a happy and united people, it will be a palliation of our grief to know that the worthy end was accomplished through the exertions and death of him and such as him on the battlefield of our common country.

  • On 4 Oct 1862 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Lucius H. Briggs was mentioned (Volume 4 # 30) as follows:
    Funeral Services
    Appropriate funeral services occasioned by the death of Webster volunteers on the field of battle --- H. L. Amidon, L. H. Briggs, Geo. Butler, G. Foster and A. Sargent, will be held at the Methodist Church tomorrow afternoon, at the hour of the usual service.
    They will be conducted by Rev. Messrs. Cromack of the Methodist, Fish of the Baptist, and Kendall of the Congregational churches; and the usual afternoon services at the last two places of worship will be omitted. It will be noticed that to the above list of dead, the name of Moses Wood is not mentioned. The surviving parent of this young man being too ill to attend on this occasion, services occasioned by his death will be deferred until a more convenient time.
  • On 8 Jun 1863 Eleanor Patch Warren received a pension to surviving family member based on Lucius's service; mother, receiving certificate number 51344.
  • In Aug 1866, Lucius Wallace Briggs, his nephew, son of his brother Cornelins, was named for Lucius H. Briggs.
  • On 25 Sep 1869 Lucius H. Briggs was mentioned in an article about the Slater Guards, published in the Webster Times, possibly written by Elmoine Clemens.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Lucius H. Briggs was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, on the 35th anniversary of the battle. (Articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • On 4 Jul 1907 Lucius H. Briggs was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • Last Edited: 18 Aug 2016

John D. Brigham

b. 5 August 1834, d. 27 February 1900
  • Father: Samuel Brigham b. 19 Feb 1795, d. 15 Jul 1877
  • Mother: Alethina Howe b. 5 Aug 1795, d. 5 Jun 1880
  • Company: C
  • John D. Brigham was born on 5 Aug 1834 at Machias, Washington County, Maine, son of Samuel Brigham and Alethina Howe, (Note: contrary to Ford's statement of Boyleston, which is where his parents lived at one time.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, John gave his occupation as railroad repairer.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 11 months and 7 days old.
  • John D. Brigham and Samuel Davis Brigham, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Co. C.
  • On 21 Oct 1861, at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, John was reported missing.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John D. Brigham was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John D. Brigham was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 1 Jun 1862, John was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • On 10 Dec 1862 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 27 Oct 1863 John D. Brigham, 29, married Betsey J. Cutting, 29, daughter of Willis Cutting and Sally Rogers, at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • John D. Brigham and Betsey J. Cutting were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, (His nephew Edmund L. BRIGHAM, s, 28, b. MA, is enumerated with them.)
  • John D. Brigham made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in 1881, received certificate number 237437.
  • In 1886 John was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 John D. Brigham took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • On 30 Sep 1889 his brother, Samuel Davis Brigham, died at Washburn, Mclean County, North Dakota, at age 68 from the effects of a kick from a horse.
  • John D. Brigham was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. C.
  • Levi Edwin Brigham, a brother of John and Samuel Brigham, was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, as a Lieutenant in Co. Q. However, there was no company Q in the 15th Massachusetts, nor does he appear on any roster. The enumerator states, "I have been twice for his discharge papers. He agreed to drive them to me."
  • In 1896, John was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • On 22 Feb 1897 Betsey J. Cutting, his wife, died at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 62.
  • John D. Brigham died on 27 Feb 1900 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 65 years, 6 months and 22 days old.
  • He was buried in Feb 1900 at Woodlawn Cemetery, Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: Orange Avenue; Lot 211; Grave 4.
  • From the Brigham Genealogy -
    He was in the Civil War and was taken prisoner; after his release he settled in Clinton.
  • In 1931 his daughter, Mabel A. Brigham, died unmarried.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Family: Betsey J. Cutting b. 4 Oct 1834, d. 22 Feb 1897

  • Mabel A. Brigham b. 25 Jul 1864, d. 1931

Samuel Davis Brigham

b. 22 March 1821, d. 30 September 1889
  • Father: Samuel Brigham b. 19 Feb 1795, d. 15 Jul 1877
  • Mother: Alethina Howe b. 5 Aug 1795, d. 5 Jun 1880
  • Company: C
  • Samuel Davis Brigham was born on 22 Mar 1821 at Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Samuel Brigham and Alethina Howe.
  • On 5 Oct 1842 Samuel Davis Brigham, 21, married Sarah E. Read, 21, at Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, she of Machias, Maine.
  • He tried his hand at farming, but that didn't work out. He became a butcher in the late 1840's.
  • Samuel Davis Brigham and Sarah E. Read were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 27 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Samuel D. Brigham, butcher, b. MA
    Sarah, 39, b. ME
    Frances A., 16, b. MA
    Caroline S., 9, b. MA
    Austin D., 5, b. MA
    Fostina W., 2, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Samuel gave his occupation as butcher.
  • In 1861 Samuel was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Samuel mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 40 years, 3 months and 20 days old.
  • Samuel Davis Brigham and John D. Brigham, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Co. C.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Samuel Davis Brigham was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 30 Jun 1862, at Nelson's Farm, Virginia, Samuel was reported missing.
  • On 8 Aug 1862, at "The Public Ledger", Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, Samuel D. Brigham and James Sullivan were mentioned among the sick and wounded brought by transport steamer from Harrison's Landing.
  • Samuel was injured carrying an ammunition box in early 1863, and was released from the military at that time. He applied for and received a disability pension.
  • On 24 Jan 1863 Samuel ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 21 Jan 1863.
  • On 4 Feb 1867 Samuel's daughter, Frances Alothina Brigham married Eugene Smith, son of Nathaniel and Sophia (Wilkins) Smith, and a veteran of the 1st MA HA, at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Over time, he apparently largely recovered from injuries, and in 1869 left his family and headed west. He settled in San Francisco for a time, but he apparently lived in many different locations including AZ, CA, Oregon and Washington State. He eventually settled in North Dakota.

    During this time he never contributed to the maintenance of his wife or children, though he apparently corresponded with them at times. In 1888, his daughter Faustina Brigham Robertson and her husband Alexander Robertson lived with him in North Dakota for a few months.
  • On 28 Apr 1880 Samuel's daughter, Faustina Brigham married Alexander Robertson at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Samuel Davis Brigham was not enumerated in the household of Sarah E. Read in the 1880 US Federal Census on on 2 Jun 1880 at at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Brigham, Sarah E., 56, married, b. ME
    Robertson, Faustina, 23, daur, b. MA
    ---, Alexander, 23, son-in-law, dyer in mill, b. Scotland
    Brigham, Louis W., 19, single, house painter, b. MA
    Smith, Elmer, E., 12, g-son, b. MA
    ---, Sarah E., 9, g-daur, b. MA
    ---, Norah G., 7, g-daur, b. MA
    (Note: these last are the children of her deceased daughter, Frances Smith.)
  • Samuel Davis Brigham died on 30 Sep 1889 at Washburn, Mclean County, North Dakota, from the effects of a kick from a horse. He was 68 years, 6 months and 8 days old.
  • He was buried in Oct 1889 at Riverview Cemetery, Washburn, Mclean County, North Dakota, Section O-G.
  • Sarah E. Brigham was enumerated as the widow of Samuel D. Brigham, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Levi Edwin Brigham, a brother of John and Samuel Brigham, was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, as a Lieutenant in Co. Q. However, there was no company Q in the 15th Massachusetts, nor does he appear on any roster. The enumerator states, "I have been twice for his discharge papers. He agreed to drive them to me."
  • On 8 Aug 1890 Sarah E. Read received a pension to surviving family member, in Massachusetts based on Samuel's service; mading application number 455845 , but no certificate is recorded. She made the following statement in her application:
    "I am the recognized Widow of Samuel D. Brigham as papers sent you on the the settlement of his estate will show that I was legally entitled to his property sent wehn I made application for accrued pension due him onte of his death. There wer nine (9) children born to us. When he came home from the War he was brought home a cripple. I took care of him for two years, he being entirely unable to work. I kept boarding house in Clinton, Massachusetts. I support him and our children as he gained in strength he decided to go West. I received letters and money from him, but the letters are lost or burned up. He never applied for divorce to my knowledge. His relatives in his vicinity are ready to affirm my claim as his widow."
  • Sarah applied for a widow's pension shortly after Samuel's death, but the long absence of Samuel from the family caused a great controversy with the pension board. The family filed affidavit after affidavit trying to satisfy
    their concerns about her eligibility. This dispute wound around the bureaucracy for three years until Sarah died. The pension board then closed the file as a moot issue. The widow never got her $8 per month. (according to AF.)
  • Sarah, his wife, outlived Samuel and died on 30 Apr 1893 at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 72.
  • In 1896, Samuel was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • John, his brother, outlived Samuel and died on 27 Feb 1900 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 65.
  • Last Edited: 14 Mar 2017

Family: Sarah E. Read b. 29 Oct 1820, d. 30 Apr 1893

  • Frances Alothina Brigham b. 14 Oct 1843, d. 26 Oct 1877
  • Samuel Brigham b. 1845
  • Josephine Brigham b. 1847
  • Caroline Brigham b. 15 Sep 1850, d. 20 Jun 1894
  • Austin D. Brigham b. May 1857, d. 27 Jul 1924
  • Faustina Brigham b. 20 Sep 1859, d. 20 Apr 1914
  • Louis W. Brigham b. between 1860 - 1861
  • Laura G. Brigham b. 6 Oct 1861, d. 9 Apr 1868

Frederick A. Britton

b. 22 February 1842, d. 27 April 1896
  • Father: Frederick Britton
  • Mother: Viola Smith b. between 1821 - 1822, d. 1885
  • Company: B
  • Frederick A. Britton was born on 22 Feb 1842 at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Frederick Britton and Viola Smith.
  • (Note: his father's name is open to discussion in light of his mother's marriage to Gould in 1859. She gives her parents' names as "Abner and Rachel Britton.")
  • Frederick A. Britton and Viola Britton were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 17 Aug 1850 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Viola Britton W, 31, b. VT
    Frederick A. Britton, 10, b. MA
    -- in a boarding house.
  • On 27 Jan 1859 Frederick's widowed mother, Viola Smith, remarried to George P. Gould at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to be a first marriage for both (??)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Frederick gave his occupation as chair maker.
  • In 1861 Frederick was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Frederick mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years, 4 months and 20 days old.
  • On 1 Jan 1862 Frederick was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 28 Dec 1862 Frederick was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 21 May 1863 Frederick ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • In 1866 Frederick A. Britton was a musician.
  • On 15 Nov 1866 Frederick A. Britton, 24, married Maria A. Lawrence, 27, daughter of Henry L. Lawrence and Martha A. Leighton, at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Frederick A. Britton made application for a veteran's pension in Jan 1867, received certificate number 82516.
  • On 1 Sep 1868 Maria A. Lawrence, his wife, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 29 of "uremia."
  • Frederick A. Britton was enumerated in the household of Viola Gould and George P. Gould in the 1880 US Federal Census on on 10 Jun 1880 at at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Gould, Viola, 58, b. ME
    ---, George P., 56, husband, engineer, b. MA
    ---, Mary V., 67, mother-in-law, widow, b. NH
    **Britton, Fred'k A., 39, son, musician, b. MA, widower.
  • In 1885 his mother, Viola Gould, died at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Frederick was living at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 27 Apr 1896 at Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, of tuberculosis. He was 54 years, 2 months and 5 days old.
  • He was buried on 29 Apr 1896 at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Div. 3, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, (South Side of Pilgrim Path and Locust Avenue) Beech Avenue. Read the report from the Fitchburg Sentinal, Wed., 29 April 1896
    Burial of Fred A. Britton

    The remains of Fred A. Britton were brought, this morning, from Waltham, in charge of Quartermaster H. B. Harrington and 10 members of F. P. H. Rogers Post 29, G. A. R. of Waltham, of which Mr. Britton was a member. They were met at the depot by a detail of Post 19, G. A. R., in command of Junior Vce Commander William H. Wheeler, and escorted to the grave in Laurel Hill cemetery, where the body was interred by the side of his wife.

    The Grand Army burial service was conducted by Junior Vice Commander Wheeler of Post 19 and Chaplain E. I. Fisher of Pst 29 of Waltham. Mr. Britton was a member of the old Fitchburg Coronet band and also of the Waltham Watch Factory band, and Tafley Mauch rendered on the coronet, "Nearer My God to Thee," and sounded tapy.

    The pall bearers were Gen. J. W. Kimball, representing Company B, 15th Mass. regiment (Fitchburg Fusiliers), Comrades N. F. Bond and L. L. Jaquith and James Daley, representing Post 10, G. A. R., and George W. Gragg and John Adams, representing Post 29.


    The following comrades of Post 29 were present - Quartermaster H. B. Harrington, Officer of the Guard Charles F. Butman, Chaplain Edward I. Fisher and Comrades John Adams, George W. Gragg, Samuel Rich, Theodore F. Holbrook, John Dale, Joseph Peterson, William B. Paul and William S. Wellington.

    Gen. Kimball was the only member of Company B, 15th Mass. Regiment present. Mr. Brtton enlisted when Gen. Kimball was captain of the company and was promoted by him to sergeant. Hewas a brave and faithful soldier.

    His wife, who was a daughter of the late Henry L. Lawrence, died in 1868. A number of friends were present at the service.

  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Maria A. Lawrence b. 10 Jan 1839, d. 1 Sep 1868

Amos W. Broad

b. between 1843 and 1844, d. 22 March 1865
  • Father: Erastus Broad b. 9 Aug 1807, d. 9 Jan 1878
  • Mother: Lois Fales b. between 1808 - 1809, d. 6 Apr 1863
  • Company: C
  • Amos W. Broad was born between 1843 - 1844 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Erastus Broad and Lois Fales.
  • Amos W. Broad was enumerated in the household of Erastus Broad and Lois Fales in the 1850 US Federal Census on 14 Sep 1850 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Erastus Broad, 42, farmer, $2000 property value, b. MA (as were all the family)
    Lois, 41
    Eliza, 17
    Lyman, 14 (f. sic)
    Aaron, 10
    **Amos, 16
    Harriet, 4.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Amos gave his occupation as yeoman.
  • In 1862 Amos was living at West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 18 Feb 1862 Amos mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting Apr 1863, Amos also served in the attached to Battery "B", 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery.
  • On 6 Apr 1863 his mother, Lois Fales, died at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Amos ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by (administrative) transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 30 Sep 1864 his brother, Lyman Broad, died at Poplar Grove Church, Virginia, killed in action with the 57th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • On 27 Oct 1864 Amos was taken prisoner and paroled at unknown date.
  • On 4 Dec 1864 Amos's widowed father, Erastus Broad, remarried to Eliza A. Ward at West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Amos W. Broad died on 22 Mar 1865 at in hospital, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, as a member of the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery.
  • Last Edited: 16 Mar 2015

David Brooks

b. between 1832 and 1833
  • Company: 1_SS
  • David Brooks was born between 1832 - 1833.
  • In 1862 David was living at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 25 Oct 1862 David Brooks mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters according to the 1870 AG report, with no further information.
  • Last Edited: 1 Sep 2012

Adelbert Leonard Brown

b. 8 March 1842, d. 18 June 1862
  • Father: Leonard Brown b. 17 Aug 1811, d. 9 Jul 1889
  • Mother: Susan Sargent b. between 1814 - 1815, d. 4 Dec 1868
  • Company: G
  • Adelbert Leonard Brown was born on 8 Mar 1842 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Leonard Brown and Susan Sargent.
  • Adelbert Leonard Brown was enumerated in the household of Leonard Brown and Susan Sargent in the 1860 US Federal Census in Jun 1860 at Millbury P. O., Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Leonard Brown, 48, b. MA (as were all)
    Susan S., 45
    Alexcina H., 20
    **Adelbert L., 18
    Alison S., 15 (m)
    Amelia W., 13
    Adin C., 3.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Adelbert gave his occupation as bootmaker.
  • In 1861 Adelbert was living at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Adelbert mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 19 years, 4 months and 4 days old.
  • On 31 May 1862 Adelbert was wounded at The Battle of Fair Oaks, Henrico County, Virginia, in the shoulder.
  • He died on 18 Jun 1862 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, of wounds. He was 20 years, 3 months and 10 days old.
  • He was buried in Jun 1862 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, from the National Aegis & Transcript, June 28, 1862 (Volume 25 # 26) Grafton.---The funeral services of the late Adelbert L. Brown, Co. G, 15th M.V., who died at Philadelphia on his return home, was attended at the first Baptist Church in this place Sunday P. M. Sermon by the pastor, Rev. Dr. Robbins, who was assisted in the exercises by Revs. Bisco and Andrews.
  • On 29 May 1879 Leonard Brown received a pension to surviving family member based on Adelbert's service; father, receiving certificate number 203341.
  • Last Edited: 25 Aug 2016

Asa Everett Brown

b. 31 December 1834, d. 21 May 1873
  • Father: Hamilton Brown b. between 1804 - 1805
  • Mother: Adelia Spaulding b. 24 Feb 1809, d. 27 Jul 1842
  • Company: A
  • Asa Everett Brown was born on 31 Dec 1834 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Hamilton Brown and Adelia Spaulding.
  • On 27 Jul 1842 his mother, Adelia Spaulding, died at age 33.
  • On 10 Oct 1856 Asa E. Brown, 21, married Allena Henrietta Dodge, 20, daughter of Stephen Dodge and Elvira E. Foster, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Asa gave his occupation as comb maker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Asa mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 6 months and 12 days old.
  • On 26 Jun 1862 Asa ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability. (Noted: the 1870 roster says in January.)

  • On 21 Nov 1862 his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant was cancelled.
  • On 9 Feb 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, A. Everett Brown was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • He and Allena Henrietta Dodge were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 17 Jun 1870 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Brown, Asa E., 35, works in saloon, b. MA
    ---, Allenor H., 34, b. MA.
  • A. Everett Brown died on 21 May 1873 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 38 years, 4 months and 21 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1873 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Lot 279, Section 01.
  • On 25 Jun 1873 Helen H. Brown received a pension to surviving family member based on Asa's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 166059.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Elvira E. Dodge in the 1880 US Federal Census on 8 Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Dodge, Elvira E., 67, widow. b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Wooster F., 38, son, paper box manufacture
    ---, Sibil E., 32, daur-in-law, works in box shop
    ---, Flora E., 11, grand-daur
    **Brown, Helena H., 43, daur, widow, at home
    Tenney Clement, 32, son-in-law, works in box shop
    ---, Alice F., 30, daur
    ---, Lillian S., 3, grand-daur
    Billings, George H., 30, boarder, single.
  • Helen H. Brown was enumerated as the widow of Asa Everett Brown, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Allena Henrietta Dodge b. 25 Apr 1836

Charles T. Brown

b. 16 February 1824, d. 23 April 1902
  • Father: Edmund Brown
  • Mother: Sally Yill
  • Company: A
  • Charles T. Brown was born on 16 Feb 1824 at Saugus, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Edmund Brown and Sally Yill.
  • Charles T. Brown was enumerated in the household of Lydia Smith in the 1850 US Federal Census on 13 Sep 1850 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Lydia Smith, 59, b. MA (as were all)
    Amariah C., 35 (m.)
    Lydia S., 32
    Otis R., 23
    Sarah E., 21 (his future wife)
    Isaac E., 18, shoemaker
    David H. Parker, 32, shoemaker
    **Charles T. Brown, 26, shoemaker
    Gerry H. Ahern, 20, shoemaker.
  • On 22 Nov 1853 Charles T. Brown, 29, married Sarah E. Smith, 24, daughter of James Smith and Lydia Sargent, at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Charles gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 37 years, 4 months and 26 days old.
  • On 4 Nov 1862 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He and Sarah E. Smith were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1870 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Brown, Charles T., 46, express driver, $300 personal estate, b. MA
    ---, Sarah E., 41, school teacher, b. MA
    ---, Jennie F., 3, b. MA
    Wheeler, Jane, 58, housekeeper, $500 personal estate, b. MA (relationship, if any, unknown.)
  • Charles T. Brown and Sarah E. Smith were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he Works In a Button Shop.
  • Charles T. Brown made application for a veteran's pension on 9 Jun 1880, and received certificate number 249104.
  • On 22 Jan 1885 Charles and Sarah's daughter, Jennie Frances Brown married Phillip S. Tolman at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Charles T. Brown was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A.
  • He died on 23 Apr 1902 at Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 78 years, 2 months and 7 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1902 at Evergreen Cemetery, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In May 1902 Sarah E. Smith received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Charles's service; his wife, received certificate number 538320.
  • Sarah, his wife, outlived Charles and died on 8 Sep 1919 at age 90.
  • The personal papers or letters of Charles T. Brown are available at at Leominster Historical Society, Leominster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, consisting of a collection of 21 letters, written to his wife, Sarah.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Family: Sarah E. Smith b. 5 May 1829, d. 8 Sep 1919

  • Jennie Frances Brown b. 22 Aug 1866

Cyrus Brown

b. 1837, d. 1 February 1869
  • Father: Moses Brown b. 2 Jan 1802, d. 6 Apr 1887
  • Mother: Mary Bartlet Bradley b. 14 Nov 1804, d. 5 Jun 1893
  • Company: B
  • Cyrus Brown was born in 1837 at Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine, son of Moses Brown and Mary Bartlet Bradley.
  • Cyrus Brown was enumerated in the household of Moses Brown and Mary Bartlet Bradley in the 1850 US Federal Census on 27 Aug 1850 at Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine, as:
    Moses Brown, 48, farmer, b. ME (as were all in the family)
    Mary, 45
    Joshu, 22, farmer
    **Cyrus, 13
    Jothrew (m), 10
    Emaline, 7
    Roxanna, 4
    Ann, 72, b. NH.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Cyrus gave his occupation as scythe maker.
  • In 1861 Cyrus was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 1 Jan 1861 Cyrus was promoted to Sergeant, apparently in the local militia.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Cyrus mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 24 years old.
  • On 18 Dec 1862 Cyrus ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 22 Dec 1862, and received certificate number 10623.
  • Starting 10 Aug 1864, Cyrus also served in the 4th Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, Co. H.
  • He ended his service as a Sergeant on 17 Jun 1865.
  • He died on 1 Feb 1869 at Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine. He was 32 years old.
  • He was buried in Feb 1869 at Seavey's Corner Cemetery, Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine.
  • On 23 Oct 1876 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Cyrus Brown was reported as deceased at the 10th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts in an article in the Fitchburg Sentinel. Click the icon to read the report.
  • Moses, his father, outlived Cyrus and died on 6 Apr 1887 at Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine, at age 85.
  • Mary, his mother, outlived Cyrus and died on 5 Jun 1893 at Vienna, Kennebec County, Maine, at age 88.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Dexter S. Brown

b. 2 July 1839, d. 15 December 1862
  • Father: Benedict Brown Jr. b. 1798, d. 14 Mar 1840
  • Mother: Hannah P. Spencer b. 4 May 1802, d. 27 Jul 1877
  • Company: H
  • Dexter S. Brown was born on 2 Jul 1839 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, son of Benedict Brown Jr. and Hannah P. Spencer.
  • On 14 Mar 1840 his father, Benedict Brown Jr., died.
  • Dexter's widowed mother, Hannah P. Spencer, remarried to Otis H. Briggs.
  • Dexter S. Brown was enumerated in the household of Hannah P. Spencer in the 1850 US Federal Census on 6 Sep 1850 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George A. Brown, 28, farmer, b. RI (s/o Leonard, m. 25 Dec 1844 in Grafton)
    Catherine F. (Sadler), 28, b. MA
    William U., 2, b. MA
    Henry A., 1, b. MA
    Hannah P. Briggs, 47, b. RI
    **Dexter Brown, 12, b. RI.
  • Dexter S. Brown was enumerated in the household of Otis H. Briggs and Hannah P. Spencer in the 1860 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1860 at Sutton P. O., Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Otis H. Briggs, 49, carpenter, b. MA
    H. P., (f), 58, b. RI
    **D. S. Brown, 21, bootmaker, b. RI
    S. J. Rawson, 5, b. MA
    (two houses away)
    Wm. Brown, 62, farmer, b. RI (as were all in family)
    James, 21
    Alonzo, 17
    **Joseph, 15
    Susan, 18
    Sarah, 16
    (Note: these people appear to be related -- Hannah P. Briggs, b. RI, who was later buried in the same RI cemetery, is Dexter's mother. )
  • In 1861 Dexter was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Dexter gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Dexter mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years and 10 days old.
  • Dexter S. Brown and Joseph Benjamin Brown, who appear to be somehow related, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co H.
  • Dexter S. Brown died on 15 Dec 1862 at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, unmarried, of dysentery, and the death was registered in Northbridge. He was 23 years, 5 months and 13 days old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1862 at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Note: it is unclear if the RI marker is his burial or a memorial. There is also a burial registered for him in Loudon Park National Cemetery, Baltimore, MD, Section A Site 1164.
  • Hannah, his mother, outlived Dexter and died on 27 Jul 1877 at Upton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 75.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Edwin Richmond Brown

b. 1839, d. 23 June 1864
  • Father: Rowland Hall Brown b. 19 Oct 1808, d. 20 Jun 1885
  • Mother: Nancy M. Whitmarsh b. 1 May 1808, d. 10 Nov 1857
  • Company: H
  • Edwin Richmond Brown was born about in 1839 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, son of Rowland Hall Brown and Nancy M. Whitmarsh.
  • Edwin Richmond Brown was baptized on 7 Mar 1847 at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Rowland Hall Brown and Nancy M. Whitmarsh in the 1850 US Federal Census on 19 Aug 1850 at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Rowland H. Brown, 41, carder, b. RI
    Nancy, 41, b. RI
    Charles H., 17, spinner, b. RI
    Orin S., 14, b. RI
    **Edwin R., 12, b. RI
    Nancy I, 10, b. MA
    Martha E., 8, b. MA
    Hannah E., 2, b. MA.
  • On 10 Nov 1857 his mother, Nancy M. Whitmarsh, died at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 49.
  • On 8 Sep 1859 Edwin's widowed father, Rowland Hall Brown, remarried to Hannah J. Darling at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • Edwin Richmond Brown was enumerated in the household of Rowland Hall Brown and Hannah J. Darling in the 1860 US Federal Census on 8 Jun 1860 at Sutton P. O., Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    R. H. Brown, 50, (m), overseer, b. RI
    H. I., 30, (f), b. MA
    **E. R., 21, (m), machinist, b. RI
    M. E., 17, (f), b. RI
    H. A., 11, (f), b. MA
    F. S., 9, (m), b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Edwin gave his occupation as machinist.
  • In 1861 Edwin was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Edwin mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Edwin was wounded at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, in the neck.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edwin Richmond Brown was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "Worcester Aegis & Transcript", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edwin Richmond Brown was mentioned among the casualties.
  • From the "Dollar Newspaper (Phila.) Nov. 20, 1861 p. 3:
    As an instance of the stuff of which the 15th Massachusetts regiment is composed, the following conversation may represent:
    At the Battle of Leesburg (Ball's Bluff) a privatge of Company H, being wounded, fell, a ball striking him in the chin and lodging near the windpipe.
    His captain says, "Brown, are you wounded?"
    "Yes, captain, and the ball remaining in my neck causes great difficulty in breathing. Here it is," (pinching it in his fingers) "cut it out with your knife."
    His captain responded, "I am afraid to. You will bleed to death,"
    "Cut away," says young Brown; "I had as soon bleed to death as choke to death."
    The leaden missile was soon in the hand of the boy, a souvenir in future to remind him of that unfortunate contest.
  • On 18 Sep 1862 Edwin was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 1 Sep 1863 Edwin was promoted to Sergeant.
  • Edwin was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • In Jun 1864 Edwin was wounded in the side.
  • He died on 23 Jun 1864 at Central Park Hospital, New York City, New York, of wounds from Cold Harbor, VA. He was 25 years old.
  • Last Edited: 19 Oct 2016