James Comrie

b. 1839, d. 11 March 1892

James Comrie
  • Father: Peter Comrie b. 1816
  • Mother: Marion Methuen b. 20 Nov 1806
  • Company: E
  • James Comrie was born about in 1839 at Deanston, Perthshire, Scotland, son of Peter Comrie and Marion Methuen.
  • James Comrie was enumerated in the household of Peter Comrie and Marion Methuen in the 1841 census of Scotland on 6 Jun 1841 at Deanston, Perthshire, Scotland, as:
    Peter Comrie 25
    Mrs. P Comrie 35
    Jean C Comrie 7
    Mary Comrie 4
    James Comrie 2
    Alexander M Comrie 3 Days
    Mrs. Boggie 30.
  • James Comrie was enumerated in the household of Marion Methuen in the 1850 US Federal Census on 14 Aug 1850 at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Mary Comrie, 46, b. Scotland (as were all in the family)
    Jane, 15
    Mary, 13
    **James, 11
    Maria, 7
    Alexander M., 9, $2000 personal estate.
  • James Comrie was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 24 Jul 1860 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    James Conry (sic), 21, boiler maker, b. Scotland
    living in a boarding house.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, James gave his occupation as boiler-maker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 James was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 18 Sep 1862 James was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 27 Nov 1863 James was taken prisoner at Mine Run, Virginia.
  • On 23 Dec 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Comrie was mentioned in a short report:
    The November report of this regiment shows that Lieut. Col. Joslin was captured by the enemy on the 27th ult., together with the following men: --- Corp. S. W. Armington, James Goffer, and John McDonald, Co. D; sergeant James Comries, S. Curby, and Louis Jaynau, Co. E. Capt A J Bradley has resigned. The death of Joseph Freeman of Co. E. is announced.
  • On 3 Feb 1865, Samuel Wallace Armington was reported as a released prisoner bringing news of other prisoners:
    From Southern Prisons
    S. W. Armington of Rutland, Mass., a released prisoner who was for more than a year an inmate of the rebel prisons at Belle Island, Andersonville, Charlston and Florence reports the following Massachusetts soldiers as having died in prison:
    At Richmond: Henry Frissell, Co. G, 15th Regiment; John Savage, 25th regiment.
    At Andersonville: Walter Stetson, Co. G. 15th regiment.
    At Millen: C. A. Gleason, Co. D, 15th regiment.
    Left in prison at Florence and well: Sergt. James Comrie, Co. E., Sergt. Tripp, Co. A, Sergt Cummings, Co. C, Corp. George Farr, Co. D., C. A. Green, Co. D, all of the 15th regiment.
    at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 8 Mar 1865, James was exchanged from prison.
  • On 15 Mar 1865 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Comrie was mentioned (Vol. 94 #11): "From Rebel Prisons - The following names of members of Worcester County regiments are among those recently paroled from rebel prisons who have reached Annapolis: ..... 15th Regiment-Sergt. J. A. Richardson and John Donnally, Co. D; James Comrie and Martin Welch, Co. A....."
  • On 25 Apr 1865 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts belatedly.

  • On 25 Jun 1865 James Comrie married Elizabeth Alexander at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Comrie was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Elizabeth Alexander were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at La Fayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, as:
    James Comrie 41, boiler maker, b. Scotland
    Elizabeth Comrie 37, b. Scotland
    James A. Comrie 11, b. Mich
    Jane Comrie 9, b. Ind
    Andrew Comrie 7, b. Ind
    Thomas Comrie 6 , b. Ind
    Mary Comrie 4, b. Ind
    Peter Comrie 2, b. Ind.
  • James Comrie made application at Illinois for a veteran's pension on 26 May 1890, and received certificate number 646282.
  • He died on 11 Mar 1892 at Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois. He was 53 years old.
  • He was buried in Mar 1892 at Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois, Soldiers Circle #21.
  • On 12 May 1892 Elizabeth Alexander received a pension to surviving family member in Illinois based on James's service; his wife, received certificate 390692.
  • On 8 Jul 1892 James Comrie was remembered at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as one of the deceased.
  • Elizabeth, his wife, outlived James and died on 3 Aug 1923 at Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois.
  • Last Edited: 24 Apr 2016

Family: Elizabeth Alexander b. 1843, d. 3 Aug 1923

  • James Comrie Jr. b. 1868, d. 1901
  • Jennie Comrie b. 6 Oct 1869, d. 17 Oct 1944
  • Andrew Comrie b. Aug 1872, d. 1946
  • Thomas Comrie b. Nov 1873
  • Mary Comrie b. Feb 1876, d. 1951
  • Peter Frank Comrie b. 24 Nov 1880, d. 1953
  • Jesse Comrie b. Feb 1881
  • Esther E. Comrie b. 30 Mar 1884, d. 13 Jan 1964
  • Roy R. Comrie b. 12 Feb 1886, d. 1962

Hervey James Conant

b. 19 December 1829, d. 15 May 1896
  • Father: Silas Conant b. 2 Feb 1801, d. 8 Nov 1875
  • Mother: Caroline Stone b. 19 Nov 1801, d. 8 Aug 1887
  • Company: A
  • Hervey James Conant was born on 19 Dec 1829 at Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Silas Conant and Caroline Stone.
  • On 12 May 1852 Hervey James Conant, 22, married Martha M. Upham, 22, daughter of Otis Upham and Mary Sloan, at Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Hervey James Conant and Martha M. Upham were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 22 Jun 1860 at Oakdale P. O., West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a mason. Adelaide M. Welch, 4, b. MA, lives with them.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Hervey gave his occupation as mason.
  • In 1862 Hervey was living at West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 13 Feb 1862 J. mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 32 years, 1 month and 25 days old.
  • On 7 Jan 1863 Hervey ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability in Company A.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 23 Jan 1863, and received certificate number 142057.
  • He and Martha M. Upham were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 15 Jul 1870 at West Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Hervey James Conant and Martha M. Upham were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a farmer. His brothers, Francis I., and Dexter, and his mother are enumerated with them, as well as a Caroline H. HILL, M, age 52, boarder. There are no children in the household.
  • J. Hervey Conant was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company A.
  • On 1 Jan 1895, at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, J. was granted an increase in his pension dating from 1891, according to the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • He died on 15 May 1896 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of heart disease, having been "ill for a long time", and noted as of "Co. A, 15th Regt. MVM" in the records. He was 66 years, 4 months and 26 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1896 at Cookshire Cemetery, Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1896 Martha M. Upham received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Hervey's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 440357.
  • Martha, his wife, outlived Hervey and died on 29 Feb 1908 at Sterling, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of cancer at age 78.
  • He and Martha M. Upham had no issue.
  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2016

Family: Martha M. Upham b. 19 Aug 1829, d. 29 Feb 1908

Michael Condon

d. 1 February 1873
  • Company: D
  • Michael Condon died on 1 Feb 1873.
  • He was buried in Feb 1873 at Togus National Cemetery, Togus, Kennebec County, Maine.
  • This man is buried as a member Co. D of the 15th Massachusetts, according to the VA records and a headstone at Plot: D 80.
    However, there is no record of him in any of the available rosters of the 15th.
    Please make contact if you can clarify.
  • Last Edited: 24 Apr 2016

Barney Coney

b. 1841, d. 4 October 1862
  • Father: Daniel Cooney d. 7 May 1862
  • Mother: Hannah [--?--] b. 1822
  • Company: D
  • Barney Coney was also known as Barney Cooney in Ford's history.
  • He was born about in 1841 at Ireland, son of Daniel Cooney and Hannah [--?--].
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Darney Cooney was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • In 1862 Barney was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Barney gave his occupation as shoe and bootmaker.

  • On 14 Mar 1862 Barney mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years old.
  • On 7 May 1862 his father, Daniel Cooney, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Barney was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • He died on 4 Oct 1862 at Hoffman Hospital, Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam. He was 21 years old.
  • On 29 Oct 1863 Hannah [--?--] received a pension to surviving family member based on Barney's service; his mother, received certificate number 26694.
  • On 15 Jul 1874 Barney Coney was included on the Civil War memorial at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Darney Cooney was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 29 Aug 2016

Barney Connelly

b. between 1841 and 1842
  • Company: B
  • Barney Connelly was born between 1841 - 1842 at Scotland.
  • In 1863 Barney was living at Scotland.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Barney gave his occupation as seaman.

  • On 31 Jul 1863 Barney mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • On 8 Dec 1863 Barney ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • Last Edited: 3 Sep 2012

Isaac P. Connig

b. 30 November 1837, d. 7 May 1911
  • Father: Isaac P. Connig b. 1796, d. Feb 1839
  • Mother: Cynthia L. Webb b. 1800
  • Company: C
  • Isaac P. Connig was born on 30 Nov 1837 at West Cambridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Isaac P. Connig and Cynthia L. Webb.
  • Isaac P. Connig was enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 17 Aug 1850 at Harvard, Worcester County, Massachusetts, probably as:
    William Conant, 58, farmer, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Susan, 59
    Andrew H., 22
    **Isaac Conning, 13.
  • On 12 Dec 1858 Isaac P. Connig, 21, married Sarah F. Barnard, 25, daughter of Jeremiah Barnard and Bilah Merriam, at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Isaac gave his occupation as machinist.
  • In 1862 Isaac was living at West Cambridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Aug 1862 Isaac mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 24 years, 8 months and 13 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Isaac was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, in the thigh.
  • On 1 Oct 1862 Francis Carpenter, having visited the battlefield, wrote a letter to the Webster Times detailing the status of many men after the Battle of Antietam.
  • On 17 Mar 1863 Isaac ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts for disability due to wounds received in action.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 25 Jul 1864, and received certificate number 36755.
  • He and Sarah F. Barnard were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, he is a machinist.
  • On 9 Oct 1883 Isaac P. Connig included on the official government pension rolls for Fitchburg and Leominster, as published in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. C, where he was shot in the side.
  • On 31 Oct 1891 Isaac and Sarah's daughter, Mary A. Connig married Moses L. Amidon at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1896, Isaac was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts" where it says, "Credited to West Cambridge, but not enrolled there in 1863; paid poll-tax in Clinton."
  • He and Sarah F. Barnard were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 5 Jun 1900 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Connig, Isaac B., b. Nov 1837, married 42 years, b. MA (fath b. MA, mor b. ME), machinist
    ---, Sarah F., wife, b. Feb, 1833, one of her two children living, b. MA (fath b. MA, mor b. MA)
    ---, Mary A., daur, b. Apr 1864, 36, b. MA, divorced, school teacher.
  • Isaac P. Connig was a pall bearer at the burial of Samuel Frost Slater on 11 May 1906 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Div. 1, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Oct 1907 at Grand Army Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts, Isaac P. Connig attended the 41st annual regimental reunion and banquet on the 46th anniversary of the Battle of Ball's Bluff, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel the following day.
  • He was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census in Apr 1910 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is retired. Their one living child, Mary, is divorced (unmarried) and lives with them.
  • He died on 7 May 1911 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 73 years, 5 months and 7 days old.
  • An obituary for Isaac P. Connig was published on 8 May 1911 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Isaac P. Conning, a well known Civil War veteran and a past commander of E. V. Sumner post No. 19, G. A. R., died, Sunday, at his home at Charles street, aged 73 years, 5 months and 7 days. Although a native of Cambridge, Mr. Conning had lived most of his life in this city, enjoying a wide acquaintance and many friendships as the result of his long residence and prominence in the G. A. R. He was also well known to the maöchinists' trade which he followed all his life and had held many responsible positions in local shops. He retired some time ago .... illness extending over a period of 15 months.
    Mr. Conning was born on November 30, 1837, the son of Isaac P. and Cynthia (Webb) Conning. He spent his boyhood in Cambridge, removing to Whitinsville at the age of 16 to learn the trade of machinist, following tha trade eversince, with the exception of his period of service in the Civil War. He removed to Fitchburg, with his family, in 1866, entering the employ of the Fitchburg Steam Engine Co. as foreman, retaining that position for 15 years. He was subsequently with the adjustable Saw Co. and the Deane Machine Co. for long periods, his final employment being as a machinist in the brass foundry of W. A. Hardy & Sons.
    Mr. Conning was married at Clinton in 1858 to Miss Sarah F. Barnard of that town, who survives him. They observed their golden wedding anniversary at their home in this city in 1908. There were two children, Miss Mary A. Connig, a well known teacher at the Laurel street school, and one son, who died in his 21st year.
    Mr. Conning entered the army in 1862, enlisting from Cambridge as a member of Co. D of the 15th Massachusetts infantry, which company was originally recruited in Clinton. The regiment had been in the field about a year when Mr. Conning joined it at Rockville, Md., but a few days before the battle of South MOuntain, in which he participated. He also took part in the battle of Antietam in which the 15th Massachusetts suffered the greatest loss in the shortest time, in proportion to its enrolment, of any Union regiment in the battle.
    Mr. Connig was wounded in the left leg in this conflict and was removed with other wounded to the Mt. Pleasant hospital at Washington, from which he was subsequently removed to Philadelphia, where he was ill for an extended period as a result of his wound, combined with severe attacks of measles and pneumonia. He was honorably discharged in 1863 on account of his wounds and condition as a result of his long illness.
    He had been a member of E. V. Sumner post, G. A. R., for many years, serving as its commander during the year of 1902, in September of which President Roosevelt visited this city. He also held many minor offices in the post and was always intensely interested in its welfare. He was also an active worker for many years in the social and religious circles of the First Parish (Unitarian) church, of which he had been a member for nearly 50 years.
    Mr. Connig was admired and respected by all who knew him. Notwithstanding his wide acquaintance, he was of a home loving disposition and it is within his immediate family circle and among a few intimate friends that the loss occasioned by his death will be most deeply felt.
    The funeral will be from his late home on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Post 19, G. A. R. willbe in attendance and the G. A. R. ritual service will follow the regular service. Friends are invited.
  • He was buried on 9 May 1911 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Div. 1, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Crocus Path.
  • On 9 May 1911 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, a report of his funeral was printed:
    Funeral of Isaac P. Connig
    The funeral of Isaac P. Connig was held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from his late home at 88 Charles street in the presence of an unusually large number of friends, neighbors, and comrades from E. V. Sumner Post 14, G. A. R., with large representations of the various auxiliary organizations connected with the post.
    Rev. Robert F. Leavens, pastor of the First Parish (Unitarian) church, was the officiating clergyman and there was an especially large number of beautiful floral tributes, giving evidence of a wide acquaintance and the universal regret attending the death of a highly esteemed resident. There was singing by a male quartet comprising Dr. E. H. Page, C. W. Pollard, C. H. Wood and E. C. Meekham, the selections rendered being "Art thou weary," "Abide with me" and "Lead kindly light."
    A large majority of the members of E. V. Sumner post attended the services in a body, under Commander Henry M. Saunders, conducting the G. A. R. service at the close of the regular service and escorting the body from the house to its final resting place. The honorary bearers were Comrades Sidney Sibley, Ira G. Wilkins, Albert H. Graves, and Moses H. Hoyt, all of Post 19. The active bearers were nathan C. Upham, Frank C. Hoyt, Herbert J. Bruce, Alvah M. Levy, W. G. Wheeler, and Hiram Pope, all members of Clark S. Simonds camp, Sons of Veterans. Interment was at Forest Hill cemetery.
  • On 16 May 1911 Sarah F. Barnard received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Isaac's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 724024.
  • Sarah F. Barnard survived Isaac and was buried on 9 May 1916 in Forest Hill Cemetery, at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 8 Apr 2016

Family: Sarah F. Barnard b. 14 Feb 1833, d. 7 May 1916

  • Warren Isaac Connig b. 4 May 1860, d. 7 Apr 1881
  • Mary A. Connig b. Apr 1864

George Connor

b. between 1834 and 1835
  • Company: K
  • John Warner was an alias in the 15th Massachusetts according to 1890 Veterans' Enumeration.
  • George Connor was born between 1834 - 1835 at Scotland.
  • In 1863 George was living at an unknown place in Ford's history.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as mariner.

  • On 30 Jul 1863 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
  • On 23 Apr 1864 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Navy.

  • Starting 25 Apr 1864, George also served in the the Navy.
  • He ended his service with by discharge from the Navy on 14 Jun 1865.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company K, noting his alias in the 15th and that he is partially deaf and has lost his discharge papers.
  • Last Edited: 8 Jul 2013

John Connors

b. between 1836 and 1837
  • Company: 1_SS
  • John Connors was born between 1836 - 1837.
  • In 1862 John was living at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 24 Nov 1862 John Connors mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters according to the 1870 AG report, with no further information.
  • Last Edited: 3 Sep 2012

Thomas Conroy

b. 15 February 1839
  • Father: Thomas Conroy b. 1805
  • Mother: Mary [--?--] b. 1815
  • Company: E
  • Thomas Conroy was born on 15 Feb 1839 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Thomas Conroy and Mary [--?--].
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Thomas gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • Thomas Conroy and William Conroy, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Co. E.

  • On 30 Jul 1861 Thomas mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years, 5 months and 15 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Thomas was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, with no further information.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas Conroy was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas Conroy was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas Conroy was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • Thomas was exchanged from prison, according to the MASSCW, but never reported back to the regiment.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas Conroy was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • Last Edited: 14 Oct 2012

William Conroy

b. 14 October 1840, d. 12 May 1864
  • Father: Thomas Conroy b. 1805
  • Mother: Mary [--?--] b. 1815
  • Company: E
  • William Conroy was born on 14 Oct 1840 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Thomas Conroy and Mary [--?--].
  • William Conroy and Thomas Conroy, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Co. E.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 30 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Marlborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years, 9 months and 16 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 William was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Conroy was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • William was paroled from prison.
  • On 20 Nov 1862 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • Last Edited: 14 Oct 2012

Josiah Clark Converse

b. 12 August 1843, d. 29 December 1915
  • Father: Capt. Lorenzo Converse b. 6 Oct 1800, d. 27 Jul 1853
  • Mother: Eliza Reid b. 17 Jan 1812, d. 6 Jun 1881
  • Company: F
  • Josiah Clark Converse was born on 12 Aug 1843 at New Braintree, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Capt. Lorenzo Converse and Eliza Reid, (Capt. Lorenzo7, Dr. Jacob6, Lieut. Jacob5, Ensign Edward4, Samuel3, Sergeant Samuel2, Deacon Edward1.)

  • On 27 Jul 1853 his father, Capt. Lorenzo Converse, died at New Braintree, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 52.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Josiah gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Josiah was living at New Braintree, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 12 Jul 1861 Josiah mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 17 years and 11 months old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Josiah was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 22 Jun 1864 Josiah was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Josiah ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • From the Converse Genealogy -
    He enlisted on the 4th of July 1861, and was discharged on the 28th of July 1864. He was in the Battle of Ball's Bluff, and in nearly all the battles of the Peninsula campaign, beginning with the siege of Yorktown in April 1862, and ending with the close of the Seven Days' battles in the vicinity of Richmond about the 1st of July 1862. He was wounded at Antietam, and on account of his wound was away from his regiment until December 1863.
    He was with his regiment in the spring and summer campaign of 1864, beginning with the Battle of the Wilderness the 5th of May, and ending in front of Petersburg the 22d of June. This last included a series of battles near Spottsylvania Court House, and the Battle of Cold Harbor. He was taken prisoner near Petersburg, Va., 22 June 1864, and was moved to Libby Prison, whence, however, he was very soon liberated on parole. Not long after he returned with his regiment, and with his regiment was discharged in July 1864.
  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Josiah Clark Converse was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • On 30 Nov 1870 Josiah Clark Converse, 27, married Ruth Ann Whitney, 25, daughter of Charles Whitney and Martha G. Collins, at Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Josiah Clark Converse made application for a veteran's pension on 1 May 1878, and received certificate number 157735.
  • He and Ruth Ann Whitney were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 21 Jun 1880 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Converse, Josiah E., 36, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Ruth A., 34, wife
    ---, Eliza, 8, daur
    ---, Martha A., 6, daur
    ---, Lorenzo, 4, son
    ---, Jane R., 2, daur
    ---, Inez W., 11/12, daur (July)
    Mahoney, Alice, 24, servant, single, house keeper, b. Ireland.
  • In 1886 Josiah was living at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Josiah Clark Converse took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • On 23 Oct 1886 Ruth Ann Whitney, his wife, died at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 41 of typhoid.
  • Josiah Clark Converse was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. F.
  • On 19 Sep 1896 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Josiah Clark Converse attended a reunion of Company F, as reported in the Worcester Daily Spy the following day.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 13 Jun 1900 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Converse, Josiah, b. Aug 1843, widower, b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Jannie, daur, b. Sep 1877, single
    ---, Inez, daur, b. July 1879, single
    ---, Maxcy, son, b. Oct 1885, single.
  • In 1901 Josiah was living at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where, for eleven years, he had been chosen a member of the Board of Assessors.
  • On 21 Oct 1902 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Josiah Clark Converse attended 36th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment Association.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Josiah C. Converse attended the 37th annual regimental reunion with some eighty other veterans.
  • He was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 10 May 1910 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Converse, Josiah C., 67, widower, b. MA, farmer
    ---, Maxcy C., son, 24, single, b. MA, laborer
    ---, Inez, daur, 30, single, b. MA, no occupation.
  • On 27 Oct 1910 at The State Mutual Building, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Josiah C. Converse attended the 44th reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Josiah and Ruth's daughter, Jane Ruth Converse married John C. Karasek.
  • Josiah Clark Converse died on 29 Dec 1915 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 72 years, 4 months and 17 days old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1916 at Walnut Grove Cemetery, North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 8 Apr 2016

Family: Ruth Ann Whitney b. 7 Oct 1845, d. 23 Oct 1886

  • Eliza Converse b. 14 May 1872, d. 30 Jan 1932
  • Martha Alice Converse b. 6 Oct 1873, d. 15 Mar 1949
  • Lorenzo Converse b. 29 Dec 1875, d. 20 Jul 1957
  • Jane Ruth Converse b. 23 Sep 1877, d. 13 Jan 1925
  • Inez Whitney Converse b. 13 Jul 1879, d. 26 Mar 1959
  • Maxcy Charles Converse b. 24 Oct 1885, d. 2 Jun 1958

Myla Seamens Converse

b. 19 March 1843, d. 9 November 1905

Myla S. Converse
  • Father: Chester Converse b. 25 Dec 1810, d. 20 Oct 1869
  • Mother: Caroline Freeman b. 17 May 1813, d. 6 Jan 1897
  • Company: I
  • Myla Seamens Converse was born on 19 Mar 1843 at Schroon, Essex County, New York, son of Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman, (descended from Chester8, Hezekiah7, Chester6, Lieut. Jacob5, Ensign Edward4, Samuel3, Sergeant Samuel2, Deacon Edward1); and on the maternal side, grandson of Samuel and Arminda (Foster) Freeman of Webster.
  • Myla Seamens Converse was named for Myla Seaman, his uncle apparently.
  • In Mar 1860 Myla Seamens Converse moved with Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman, his parents, from New York to to Webster.
  • Myla Seamens Converse was enumerated in the household of Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman in the 1860 US Federal Census on 18 Jul 1860 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Chester Converse, 49, farmer, b. MA
    Caroline, 47, b. MA
    Esther, 24, weaver, b. CT
    Abigail, 22, weaver, b. NY
    Zensa (f), 18, weaver, b. NY
    **Franklin, 19, weaver, b. NY
    **Mila, 17, weaver, b. NY
    Freeman, 12, b. NY
    Caroline, 7, b. NY
    Charles, 4, b. NY.
  • Myla Seamens Converse was employed by S. S. Slater and Son's woolen mill in 1861 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Myla gave his occupation as operative.
  • Myla Seamens Converse and William Franklyn Converse, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 15 May 1861 Myla mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 18 years, 1 month and 26 days old.
  • From Some of the Ancestors and Descendants of Samuel Converse, Jr., 1905:
    He enlisted for three years or during the War in Co. I, 15th Mass. Volunteers, and served throughout the war. The first engagement in which he participated was the Battle of Ball's Bluff, Va., in October 1861. In that battle his brother William Franklyn Converse was captured, and afterward died in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va.
    In March 1862, the regiment with which Myla S. Converse was enlisted went to Harper's Ferry, Va; crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and went to Winchester, Va., with General Shields. After Gen. Stonewall Jackson was driven out of Winchester, his division, Gen. John Sedgwick in command, returned to Washington; took steamers at Washington, going down the Potomac to Fortress Monroe, Va.
    From Virginia they went to Yorktown where the division was assigned to the Second Army corps then commanded by Gen. E. V. Sumner. After the evacuation of Yorktown they went to West Point, Va., on the York River, by steamers, where they disembarked and had an engagement with the enemy. From there they took boat again and went to White House Landing where they disembarked, crossed the peninsula to the Chickahominy where they took part, together with the First Minnesota, in building the great Grape Vine Bridge on which General Sumner moved his corps across to the opposite side of the river to reinforce the left wing of the Colonel's army on the 31 May 1862, during the battle of Fair Oaks.
    In this engagement about four o'clock in the afternoon, the 15th Mass. arrived on the field and immediately became engaged. At about half past four Myla Seamens Converse was severely wounded in his right thigh, the thigh-bone being broken, and just as he was to be carried from the field he received another wound through the right hand. He was sent back with others of the wounded to White house landing where he took steamer for Philadelphia.
    He was in a hospital on Wood Street, near 22nd Street from about the 6th or 7th day of June, 1862, until the latter part of July, when he received a furlough and went home for thirty days. He reported to his company again for duty at Sharpesburg, Va., on the morning after the Battle of Antietam. From there they went with the Army of the Potomac to Falmouth, Va., where his regiment participated in the battle of Frederick City, Va., fought by General Burnside.
  • Myla Seamens Converse and William H. Mitchell, and Stephen Wilbur Russell, future brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Myla Seamens Converse and William Franklyn Converse, and Rufus Franklin Raymond, future brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Myla Seamens Converse was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • Abram Sargent and William H. Mitchell, Myla Seamens Converse, brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 13 Feb 1862 his brother, William Franklyn Converse, died at age 20 at Richmond, Richmond County, Virginia, as a prisoner of war. In an article about, Mila S. Converse, there is mention of "his brother, William Franklin Converse, who was captured, and afterward died in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va." Also, the 1870 roster says that William "died in rebel prison," but no date is given.
  • Thomas Blasland wrote a letter on 4 Jun 1862, mentioning Myla Seamens Converse, as follows: for publication in the Southbridge Journal.
  • On 14 Jun 1862 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, the following:
    We have received a brief note from Lucius H. Briggs, a Webster volunteer who was in the engagement at Fair Oaks on the 30th ult., and 1st inst. He mentions the following casualties in Company I; Edward Lannegan, wounded in neck and face; John McGuire, foot and ankle; Milo S. Converse, leg and hand; Alpheus Remick, hand. There were other slight flesh wounds, but none sufficiently serious to be worthy of mention. None of the company was killed. The letter states that there were no displays of cowardice, but every man stood at his post, and performed his duty with a promptness and alacrity worthy of praise.
  • On 3 Jul 1862 Myla and William's sister, Tirzah Ophelia Converse, married Rufus Franklin Raymond at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 1 Oct 1862 Francis Carpenter, having visited the battlefield, wrote a letter to the Webster Times detailing the status of many men after the Battle of Antietam.
  • On 5 Jan 1863 Myla ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the regular Army.

  • Myla also served in the 1st US Cavalery, Company E. From Some of the Ancestors and Descendants of Samuel Converse, Jr., 1905, p. 641

    After this engagement the wound in the leg gave Mr. Converse some trouble in regard to marching, and he enlisted in the First U. S. Cavalry, under an order from the War Department, for the term of three years. He was assigned to Company E. Soon he accompanied the company to the front where the 1st Cavalry was assigned to what is known as the Reserved Brigade of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac, then commanded by General Stoneman.
    Their first engagement was at Kellysford, Va., on the 17th day of March, '63. This was at the beginning of General Stoneman's Raid. Their next engagement was at Beverly's Ford, June 10th, 1863; Goose Creek, June 19th; Upperville, June 21st; Gettysburg, July 3rd; Williamsport, Md., July 6th; Boonesville, July 8th; Falling Water, July 15th; Manassas Gap, July 21st; Brandy Station, Aug. 1st, and Aug. 3rd; at Mine Run, Va., Dec. 5th; on General Custer's Raid, Feb. 28th and 29th, '64; at Spottsylvania, May 7th; in the Wilderness, Va., May 8th; on General Sheridan's Raid, May 9th to 14th; at Beaver Dam, May 10th; Yellow Tavern, May 11th; Chickahominy River, May 12th, (here again he received another slight wound on his right arm just below the shoulder, which, however, did not lay him up from service); Horseshoe Shop, May 28th; at Cold Harbor, May 30th and 31st; at Trevilian Station, June 12th; at Deep Bottom, Va., July 28th; at Newtown, Aug. 12th; Shepherdstown, Aug. 29th; at Shepherdstown, Va., Sept. 1st; at Winchester, Sept. 19th; at Wilford, Sept. 23rd; Waynesboro, Sept. 28th; at Edinburgh, Oct. 8th and 9th; at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19th; on the Gordonsville Raid, Dec. 20th to 28th; on the Loudon Valley Raid, Jan. 5th to 8th, 1865; at Waynesburgh, Va., Mar. 21st; Dinwiddie Courthouse, March 30th; at Five Forks, Va., April 1st, April 2nd, 1865 and April 3rd; at Evergreen Station, April 8th; at the surrender of General Lee's army at Appomattox, Apr. 9, 1865.
    These engagements are copied from the back of his discharge, which discharge he received from Co. E, 1st U. S. Cavalry, signed and approved by Capt. George C. Sanford, commanding Co. E, 1st U. S. Cavalry, approved by A. G. Brackett, Col. commanding 1st U. S. Cavalry, also attested and approved by Major General Philip S. Sheridan, commanding Department of the Gulf.
    He was detailed in the spring of 1865, just before the surrender of Lee's Army, to report to General Sheridan's Headquarters, then being a sergeant of Co. E, to take command of orderlies; went from Washington to New Orleans with General Sheridan when he went down to take command of the Department of the Gulf. He was mustered out at New Orleans on the 17th day of December, 1865, by reason of expiration of term of service. This ended his military service.

  • On 26 Nov 1866 Myla Seamens Converse, 23, married Mary Elizabeth Emerson, 20, at Thompson, Windham County, Connecticut.
  • On 20 Oct 1869 his father, Chester Converse, died at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 58.
  • Myla Seamens Converse immigrated to Becker County, Minnesota, in the spring of 1872.
  • In Jan 1875, at Becker County, Minnesota, Myla was granted a Land Patent for Homestead by the US Government .
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 20 Jun 1876.
  • He was enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Lake Eunice, Becker County, Minnesota.
  • On 22 Feb 1881 Mary Elizabeth Emerson, his wife, died at Lake Eunice, Becker County, Minnesota, at age 34.
  • Myla's wife, Mary Elizabeth Emerson, died and was buried in Feb 1881 at Munson Lake Cemetery, Lake Eunice, Becker County, Minnesota, But there is no indication that Myla Converse is also buried here. at age 34 years and 10 months.
  • On 24 Jun 1883 Myla Seamens Converse, 40, married Grace Elizabeth Hall, 37, daughter of Edmund Nuttle and Mary Rigg, at St. Paul, Minnesota, She was the widow of Horatio A Hall. (Her father moved with his family to this country when his daughter, Grace was two years old; he died in Webster, Mass., 20 January 1880. Her mother died in Webster, Mass., 22 January 1881.)
  • Myla Seamens Converse was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Lake Eunice, Becker County, Minnesota, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company I, noting that he received a gunshot wound to the right thigh and hand.
  • He died on 9 Nov 1905 at Detroit Lakes, Becker County, Minnesota. He was 62 years, 7 months and 21 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1905 at Oak Grove Cemetery, Detroit Lakes, Becker County, Minnesota.
  • On 8 Dec 1905 Grace Elizabeth Nuttle received a pension to surviving family member, in Minnesota based on Myla's service; and received certificate number 646048.
  • On 4 Jul 1907 Myla Seamens Converse was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • Last Edited: 24 Aug 2016

Family 1: Mary Elizabeth Emerson b. 9 Mar 1846, d. 22 Feb 1881

  • Philip Sheridan Converse b. 15 Jul 1871
  • William Freeman Converse b. 30 Apr 1878

Family 2: Grace Elizabeth Nuttle b. 21 Jan 1846

William Franklyn Converse

b. 3 June 1841, d. 13 February 1862
  • Father: Chester Converse b. 25 Dec 1810, d. 20 Oct 1869
  • Mother: Caroline Freeman b. 17 May 1813, d. 6 Jan 1897
  • Company: I
  • William Franklyn Converse was born on 3 Jun 1841 at Schroon, Essex County, New York, son of Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman, (Chester8, Hezekiah7, Chester6, Lieut. Jacob5, Ensign Edward4, Samuel3, Sergeant Samuel2, Deacon Edward1); and on the maternal side, grandson of Samuel and Arminda (Foster) Freeman of Webster.
  • In Mar 1860 William Franklyn Converse moved with Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman, his parents, from New York to to Webster.
  • William Franklyn Converse was enumerated in the household of Chester Converse and Caroline Freeman in the 1860 US Federal Census on 18 Jul 1860 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Chester Converse, 49, farmer, b. MA
    Caroline, 47, b. MA
    Esther, 24, weaver, b. CT
    Abigail, 22, weaver, b. NY
    Zensa (f), 18, weaver, b. NY
    **Franklin, 19, weaver, b. NY
    **Mila, 17, weaver, b. NY
    Freeman, 12, b. NY
    Caroline, 7, b. NY
    Charles, 4, b. NY.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as operative.
  • William Franklyn Converse and Myla Seamens Converse, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 15 May 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 19 years, 11 months and 12 days old.
  • William Franklyn Converse and Myla Seamens Converse, and Rufus Franklin Raymond, future brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • John Floyd Maley wrote a letter to The Webster Times, listing his fellow prisoners, on 27 Oct 1861 from Richmond, Virginia, mentioning William Franklyn Converse, as follows.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Franklyn Converse was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Weekley Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Franklyn Converse was listed as a Company I casualty of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 William Franklyn Converse was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William F. Converse was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • He died on 13 Feb 1862 at Richmond, Richmond County, Virginia, as a prisoner of war. In an article about, Mila S. Converse, there is mention of "his brother, William Franklin Converse, who was captured, and afterward died in Libby Prison, Richmond, Va." Also, the 1870 roster says that William "died in rebel prison," but no date is given. He was 20 years, 8 months and 10 days old.
  • He was buried on 14 Feb 1862 at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia.
  • At Mount Zion Cemetery (East Village), Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William is memorialized at his family grave marker.
  • On 9 Mar 1862 at The Baptist Meeting House, Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, memorial services were held featuring a discourse and eulogy by the pastor, Rev. J. L. A. Fish:
    From The Webster Times, 22 Mar 1862 (Volume IV #2),
    Among the myriads who responded to the Presidents call, and offered their lives and their all for the maintenance of the constitution and the Laws, for the overthrow of an organized rebellion aiming at the userpation of the government, were many of our citizens. A company was soon gathered and officered. After many delays, the causes familiar to you all, they left for camp.
    They were soon transferred to another regiment, and on the 8th of August left for the activities and conflicts of the Potomac. At length they were for a soldiers life, permanently encamped at Poolesville Md., where in drill and picket duty they fitted for and engaged in the service of their country.
    On Oct. 21st, the company were engaged in the illy planned and disastrous contest of Ball’s Bluff. The sad scenes which were there enacted will ever make that day and night one of dreaded memory. They have been described to you by those whom experience fits to narrate as I cannot.....
    Among those who first enlisted, who zealously engaged in all the routine of a soldier’s life who with the brave bravely fought, was William F. Converse. With others he step by step contested the field, till he reached the bluff that overhung the Potomac. For him to attempt the river he knew would be death. Life had hope in bondage, but none in struggling with the rapid stream. He was taken prisoner, and with the others arrived in Richmond unharmed in the casualties of war and vigorous in body and mind. in the long days that followed he did much to relieve the despondency of others. After two or three months however he sickened, yet remained in the quarters with his comrades, till the fever turned and he was carried to the hospital. From this sickness he so far recovered as to return to his comrades.
    Consequent upon this recovery, nature in recruiting her wonted strength and energies, clamored incessantly for food. For a while the appetite was indulged with seeming impunity. On Friday or Saturday of February, second week, he received money from home. Thinking that other and more inviting food than his prison fare would not only be pleasing to the taste, but good for his health, he purchased as desire dictated and ate.
    It was too much for his organs, not yet recovered their healthy tone, and a relapse, sudden and fatal followed. On Saturday night, one of his friends was awakened by hearing heavy groans. He arose and found that it was our brother, intensely suffering from pain in his head. By his advice he bathed it in cold water, and returned to his couch, probably succeeded in resting for most of the time till morning., when he awoke shivering cold. At roll call the comrade above mentioned advised him to respond “sick” that he might be taken to the hospital and be placed under medical care. He refused, hoping soon to be better, influenced chiefly however, by the expectation that his name would be read from the list of exchanged prisoners. An announcement they had eagerly been waiting more than a week. He feared it would be more difficult to leave the hospital than the quarters. In the forenoon however he grew so sick that he consented to the removal; and a kind hearted comrade bore him to the hospital.
    During the day he said but little; his suffering chiefly occupying his mind. During the evening the disease made such progress as to overpower reason, a victory firmly held, with a few lucid moments excepted, till death. Home his brothers, sisters, and friends, were the paramount thoughts even of his delirium. In the morning for a few moments he rallied, and to a brother’s question, “If he wished anything,” he responded, “I am dry”. Coffee was given him. He thanked the giver, calling him by name.
    It was only for a moment. Reason again retreated. He was now in a battle where the odds against him were more fearful than in the opining where he and others stood, with firm front for liberty and right. Step by step, as there, life retreated, each rally more faint, more feeble, till disease pushed him down the dark banks into the cold cold stream of death, and there we lose sight for him forever from the shores of time. ...
    Thus died in Richmond, Feb. 13 William F. Converse, a prisoner of war, the oldest son of Charles and Caroline Converse of this town, aged 20 years and 8 months. His body was placed in a coffin, packed in charcoal, and the place of his burial marked and registered. Had his comrades been released as early as at first contemplated they would have brought with them the body. As it is we may well hope that ere the leaf now green above his grave shall fade, all that is mortal of our brother may rest in our quiet cemetery where the willow and the marble shall watch the dust of the dead and receive the tears of the living.....
    Writing from Poolesville early in September, he remarks, “We do not know how long we shall stay here; we may be ordered into battle at any time; if we are we shall do the best we can, we shall not run off if we are.” Again, “I wish this might be settled without much fighting, but we do not want any compromise now, it is to late for that. I think this war will be a death blow to slavery.” ....
  • On 3 Jul 1862 Myla and William's sister, Tirzah Ophelia Converse, married Rufus Franklin Raymond at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • A commemorative marker with his name (spelled "Lam") is in Shockoe Hill Cemetery. However, research has established that William and the other POWs, who had been buried originally just outside the walls of Shockoe Hill, were moved in 1866-67 to _Richmond National Cemetery,_ and are buried there as unknowns.
  • William Franklyn Converse was buried at Richmond National Cemetery, Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, as an unknown.
  • On 20 Oct 1869 his father, Chester Converse, died at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 58.
  • On 19 May 1873 Caroline Freeman received a pension to surviving family member based on William's service; his mother, received certificate number 220595.
  • On 4 Jul 1907 William Franklyn Converse was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • Last Edited: 24 Apr 2016

George M. Cook

b. 22 February 1841, d. 13 December 1904
  • Father: David William Cook b. 18 Jan 1809, d. 1887
  • Mother: Sarah L. Moore b. 1815, d. Apr 1894
  • Company: A
  • George M. Cook was born on 22 Feb 1841 at Belchertown, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, son of David William Cook and Sarah L. Moore.
  • George M. Cook was enumerated in the household of David William Cook and Sarah L. Moore in the 1850 US Federal Census on 8 Aug 1850 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    David W. Cook, 48, mason, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Sarah L., 35
    Frances E., 17
    Lucy A., 15
    **George M., 9
    Frank H., 7
    Joel Moore, 33, mason
    Ruth, 24
    John H. Plimpton, 22, mason.
  • George M. Cook was enumerated in the household of David William Cook and Sarah L. Moore in the 1860 US Federal Census on 9 Jul 1860 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    David W. Cook, 50, mason, b. MA (as were all in house)
    Sarah L., 44
    (next door)
    Seth Ingall, 35, carpenter
    Ruth E., 34
    Nelson E., 8
    Ida J., 6
    Hattie G., 2
    **George M. Cook, 19, lather.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, George gave his occupation as musical instrument maker.
  • In 1861 George was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 23 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years, 5 months and 1 day old.
  • On 20 Feb 1864 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Veteran Reserve Corps.

  • Starting 21 Feb 1864, George also served in the 24th V. R. C., Company I.
  • On 21 Jul 1864 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Washington, DC.

  • On 5 Jul 1865 George M. Cook, 24, married Helena Choate, 18, daughter of Francis Choate and Melinda Fern, at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 14 Feb 1866 Helena Choate, his wife, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 19 of child bed spasmodic affliction.
  • On 22 Jan 1867 George M. Cook, 25, married Sarah E. Fairbanks, daughter of Joel Whitcomb Fairbanks and Elizabeth Beman Gates, at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • George M. Cook's surviving family was enumerated in the household of David William Cook and Sarah L. Moore in the 1880 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Cook, David W., 70, b. MA
    ---, Sarah L., 65, wife, b. MA
    ---, Frank C., 14, b. MA (George's son)
    Garrity, Nellie, 19, lodger, dress maker, b. MA (of English parents.)
  • On 11 Oct 1894 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, an article was published, "After Many Years. a Romantic Meeting of Father and Son" .
  • In 1904 George was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 27 Feb 1904 George entered the Soldiers' Home.
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 24 Mar 1904, and received certificate number 1086089.
  • He died on 13 Dec 1904 at Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, of cancer of the throat. He was 63 years, 9 months and 21 days old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1904 at Forest Dale Cemetery, Soldiers Home Lot, Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Grave no. 4597.
  • George M. Cook was was one of many soldiers who resided at one time or another at Soldiers' Home, Crest Avenue, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 15 Jul 2016

Family 1: Helena Choate b. 12 Aug 1846, d. 14 Feb 1866

  • Frank Choate Cook b. 14 Feb 1866

Family 2: Sarah E. Fairbanks b. between 1840 - 1841

Ichabod W. Cook

b. 26 August 1828, d. 27 March 1880
  • Father: Zimri Cook Jr. b. 5 Jun 1800, d. 15 Jul 1855
  • Mother: Olive W. Allen b. 5 May 1804, d. 7 Sep 1870
  • Company: G
  • Ichabod W. Cook was born on 26 Aug 1828 at Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Zimri Cook Jr. and Olive W. Allen.
  • On 4 Jul 1847 Ichabod W. Cook, 18, married Waity Ann Whipple, 20, daughter of Willard Whipple and Lydia Brailey, at Cumberland, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • On 15 Jul 1855 his father, Zimri Cook Jr., died at Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 55.
  • Ichabod W. Cook was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1860 at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Polly Holbrook, 40,
    William H., 17, boot click
    Frank D.,
    **Ichabod W. Cook, 30, boot click, b. MA
    Flavis Cook, 28, boot click , b. MA
    Henry Brown, 24, painter, b. MA
    Charles Goodnow, 19, boot bottomer, b. MA
    (Note: his wife and daughter are enumerated in Smithfield, RI.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Ichabod gave his occupation as bootcutter.
  • In 1861 Ichabod was living at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Ichabod mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 32 years, 10 months and 16 days old.
  • Ichabod W. Cook and William Russell Dean, future brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • In Aug 1861 Ichabod ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts receiving a disability discharge.

  • Starting 9 Oct 1861, Ichabod also served in the 1st Rhode Island Cavalry from Milford, MA.
  • He ended his service with the 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, Co. C on 27 Sep 1862 at General Hospital, Washington, DC.
  • He and Waity Ann Whipple were separated apparently.
  • On 11 Mar 1867 Ichabod W. Cook, 38, married Amelia Rawson McFarland, 28, daughter of Hazen Leighton and Lydia Sadler Aldrich, at Upton, Worcester County, Massachusetts; she was the widow of Charles A. McFarland, who had died at Petersburg in 1864 serving with the 25th Massachusetts Infantry. It was a second marriage for both.
  • On 9 Sep 1869 Ichabod's sister, Vienna Matilda Cook, married William Russell Dean at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • On 28 Mar 1871 his daughter, Ella Frances Cook, died at age 22.
  • Ichabod W. Cook died on 27 Mar 1880 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 51 years, 7 months and 1 day old.
  • He was buried in Mar 1880 at Oak Hill Cemetery, Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Amelia Rawson Leighton in the 1880 US Federal Census on 9 Jun 1880 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Cook, Amelia R., 41, widow, keeping hotel, b. MA (fat b. ME, mor b. Can)
    McFarland, Lizzie M., 18, daur, single, b. MA (of MA parents)
    and many boarders.
  • On 12 Jul 1890 Amelia Rawson Leighton received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Ichabod's service; his wife, received certificate number 375324, for his service in Co. C of the 1st Rhode Island Cavalry.
  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2016

Family 1: Waity Ann Whipple b. 25 Sep 1826, d. 6 Feb 1872

  • Ella Frances Cook b. 17 Jun 1848, d. 28 Mar 1871

Family 2: Amelia Rawson Leighton b. 11 Mar 1839