Frederick Bullard

b. 16 November 1829, d. 20 November 1915
  • Father: Fitzroy Bullard b. 11 Dec 1799, d. 25 Jan 1875
  • Mother: Lucy Henshaw b. 13 Jun 1803, d. 13 Dec 1874
  • Company: F
  • Frederick Bullard was born on 16 Nov 1829 at East Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Fitzroy Bullard and Lucy Henshaw.
  • On 5 Jun 1853 Frederick Bullard, 23, married Mary Fletcher Paine, 21, daughter of Luther Paine and Cynthia Eaton, at East Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1856 his son, Charles Albert Bullard, died.
  • Frederick Bullard was not enumerated in the household of Fitzroy Bullard and Lucy Henshaw in the 1860 US Federal Census on 15 Jun 1860 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Fitzroy Bullard, 60, blacksmith, b. MA (as were all in family)
    Lucy, 57
    Mary F., 28 (his wife)
    Leroy F., 6
    Charles F., 1.
  • In 1861 Frederick was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Frederick gave his occupation as wheelwright.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Frederick mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 31 years, 7 months and 26 days old.
  • On 1 Mar 1862 Frederick was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 24 Jul 1862 Frederick was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Frederick was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 19 Sep 1862 Frederick was promoted to as a 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 27 Sep 1862 at "The Public Ledger", Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, Frederick Bullard was listed among the wounded.
  • On 8 Jan 1863 Frederick was promoted to as a 1st Lieutenant, but not mustered.
  • On 6 Apr 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Frederick Bullard was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • On 10 Apr 1863 at "The Southbridge Journal", Worcester County, Massachusetts, Frederick Bullard was mentioned in an article listing commissions and officer promotions in the regiment, as well as which discharged or deceased officers they replaced.
  • On 20 Apr 1863 Frederick ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability from wounds, by Special Order No. 180, as 2nd Lieutenant.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 12 Jun 1863, and received certificate number 18209.
  • Starting 1 Jan 1864, Frederick also served in the 4th Massachusetts Cavalery, Co. H.
  • On 28 Feb 1864 Frederick was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • On 30 Dec 1864 his son, Frank Leroy Bullard, died at East Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 10.
  • Frederick Bullard ended his service for disability on 24 Feb 1865 at Richmond, Richmond County, Virginia.
  • He was enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 16 Aug 1870 at East Brookfield P. O., Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Bullard, Frederick, 40, in wheel factory, b. MA (as were all in the household)
    ---, Hattie, 8, b. MA
    living in the home of:
    Henshaw, Loring, 50, farmer,
    ---, Elizabeth, 45
    ---, Watson, 18, works on farm
    Howe, Albert S., 28, in market.
  • He and Mary Fletcher Paine were divorced before 1880.
  • Frederick Bullard was enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1880 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Bullard, Frederick, 42, divorced, works in spoke shop b. MA (as were his parents and children)
    ---, Charles, 21, son, works on boots
    ---, Hattie, 18, dau
    Note: His age is about 5 years too young and needs clarification, but the occupation fits with wheelwright in 1861.
  • On 16 Jun 1883 his daughter, Hattie Adelia Bullard, died at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 21 of pneumonia.
  • In 1890 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Frederick Bullard was (or had been) a member of the Ferdinand Dexter G. A. R., Post 38, and a copy of his "personal war sketch" is now located in the Merrick Public Library.
  • Click icon to read his G. A. R. personal sketch.
  • He died on 20 Nov 1915 at Soldiers' Home, Crest Avenue, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 86 years and 4 days old.
  • He was buried on 22 Nov 1915 at Evergreen Cemetery, East Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with a military gravemarker.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Mary Fletcher Paine b. 31 Jan 1832

  • Frank Leroy Bullard b. 11 May 1854, d. 30 Dec 1864
  • Charles Albert Bullard b. 14 Nov 1855, d. 1856
  • Charles Frederick Bullard b. 12 Jul 1859
  • Hattie Adelia Bullard b. 21 Mar 1862, d. 16 Jun 1883

James Burbank

b. between 1826 and 1827
  • Company: 1_SS
  • James Burbank was born between 1826 - 1827.
  • At the time of his enlistment, James gave his occupation as Carpenter.
  • In 1861 James was living at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 James Burbank mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters.
  • On 15 Jan 1862 James ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by desertion, according to one report.

  • He made application at Rhode Island for a veteran's pension on 26 Jun 1890, but no certificate is recorded.
  • Last Edited: 21 Mar 2015

Nathaniel Burbank

b. 14 April 1838, d. 10 January 1901
  • Father: Samuel Burbank b. 31 May 1802, d. 24 Sep 1863
  • Mother: Sally Pease b. 30 Jul 1813, d. 5 Oct 1888
  • Company: B
  • Nathaniel Burbank was born on 14 Apr 1838 at Parsonfield, York County, Maine, son of Samuel Burbank and Sally Pease.
  • Nathaniel Burbank was enumerated in the household of Samuel Burbank and Sally Pease in the 1850 US Federal Census on 16 Sep 1850 at Parsonfield, York County, Maine, as:
    Samuel Burbank, 47, farmer, b. ME (as were all in the family)
    Sally, 36
    Charles M., 18, farmer
    Luther, 14
    **Nathaniel, 12
    John, 8
    Caroline A., 3
    George, 2.
  • Nathaniel Burbank was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 12 Jul 1860 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as a painter (sic), apparently in a boarding house with unrelated others.
  • On 30 Sep 1862 at Parsonfield, York County, Maine, Luther S. Burbank his elder brother, enlisted as a Private in Company H, 27th Maine Infantry Regiment, mustering out on Jul 17, 1863 in Portland.
  • On 30 Sep 1862 John P. Burbank his younger brother, enlisted in Co. H, 27th. Maine Infantry serving until July 17, 1863.
  • In 1863 Nathaniel was living at Parsonfield, York County, Maine.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Nathaniel gave his occupation as printer.

  • On 9 Jul 1863 Nathaniel mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 2 months and 25 days old.
  • On 24 Sep 1863 his father, Samuel Burbank, died at age 61.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Nathaniel ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Nathaniel also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company E.
  • He ended his service with thr 20th MVI by discharge for promotion on 15 Sep 1864.
  • Starting 17 Sep 1864, Nathaniel also served in the 10th U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery, Co. B - 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 27 Sep 1864 Nathaniel was promoted to 1st Lieutenant of Company G.
  • On 13 Mar 1865 Nathaniel was promoted to Brevet Captain, U. S. Volunteers.
  • Starting 22 Jan 1867, Nathaniel also served in the 37th U. S. Infantry (Regular Army) - 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 2 Mar 1867 Nathaniel was promoted to Brevet 1st Lieutenant, U. S. Army.
  • He ended his service by resignation as 1st Lieutenant, 5th U. S. Infantry (Regular Army) on 1 Aug 1869.
  • On 6 Sep 1878 at New Orleans, Louisiana, the New York Times reported that "At last accounts Nathaniel Burbank, the humorist, was resting quietly, and had every prospect of a speedy recovery." There was an epidemic of yellow fever in the city at this time.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension, and received certificate number.
  • On 9 Nov 1882 Nathaniel Burbank, 44, married Ella Electa Burbank, 32, daughter of Samuel M. Burbank and Philenia Hank, at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana; it was reported in the New York Times, 11 Nov 1882 as follows: 10 Nov. Major Nathaniel Burbank, managing editor of the New Orleans Picayune, was married last night to Miss Ella Burbank, daughter of a wealthy planter of Ascension Parish. The wedding was a strictly private affair. The groom was a journalist of Boston before the war. He accepted a commission in the regular Army, and served for several years on the staffs of Gen. Canby and Gen. Sheridan. He resigned at the close of the war, and attached himself to the New Orleans press, making quite a general reputation as a writer of pointed, pungent paragraphs and humorous sketches.
  • At New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, Nathaniel was the managing editor of Daily Picayune newspaper.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Felicity Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company B.
  • In 1891 Nathaniel Burbank was managing editor of "The Picayune."
  • He and Ella Electa Burbank were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 6 Jun 1900 at Felicity Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, as:
    Burbank, Nathaniel, b. Apr 1840 (sic), married 17 years, b. Maine (as were his parents), he is a manager editor, and they live in a rented home
    ---, Ella, wife, b. Jan 1850, she has no children, b. NY (as were her parents.)
  • Nathaniel Burbank died on 10 Jan 1901 at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana. He was 62 years, 8 months and 27 days old.
  • An obituary for Nathaniel Burbank was published on 11 Jan 1901 at "The Times Picayune", New Orleans, Louisiana, as follows:
    Major Nathaniel Burbank.
    The hand of the Grim Reaper was laid heavily yesterday upon the Picayune, as well as on his many friends, in the sudden and most unexpected death of Major Nathaniel Burbank, a most distinguished member of the staff of this paper. He had left his home in the city in the forenoon, boarding a car on his way to the Picayune office, when, by one of those silent but terrible visitations of nature, he sank in his seat in a state of insensibility and expired in a few moments, despite the best efforts of those around him and the aid called to him. Some sudden and mysterious internal shock had overwhelmed his vitality, and in a very few moments he was lost to his friends and to the affairs of this world.
    Major Burbank got his military title in service in the field under the United States flag, in the Civil War. He was a native of Maine, and, when quite a youth, he began as a typesetter in a New Hampshire newspaper office the career of journalism in which he won high distinction.
    It was while working in a Boston newspaper office that the war between the States broke into the storm which for four years raged with unexampled fury and grew to proportions which shook not merely the continent upon which it was waged, but was felt among the greatest nations of the earth, and called the young printer from his case to the defense of the Union. He laid down the composing stick, ancient badge of the most peaceful of professions, and took up a musket, enlisting as a private soldier in the Fifteenth Regiment of Massachusetts Infantry. His faithful and gallant services won him promotion until he rose to the rank of major in the volunteer forces, and was brevetted for distinguished services in the battle at Bristow, Va. At the close of the war, being mustered out of the volunteer forces, his ability was recognized by an appointment to a lieutenancy in the regular army, from which he soon resigned, and settling in New Orleans, to which his military duties had brought him, he returned to civil pursuits, finding employment on the Republican newspaper which had been the organ of that party in the State.
    With the restoration of control of the State to the care of its own people, in the latter part of the seventies of the century just closed, the Republican ceased to exist, and Major Burbank took service on the editorial staff of the Picayune, with which he was actively engaged to the moment of his untimely demise. He occupied the post of managing editor; but his most distinguished functions were in the conduct of a bright and witty column of "Picayunas," on the editorial page, and in dramatic criticism.
    From the time the Picayune was founded by the brilliant and accomplished George W. Kendall to the present time, the New Orleans Picayune has been noted for the justice, discrimination and nice perception of its judgement of actors and plays. The verdict of the Picayune has been potential to make the reputation of not a few of the most distinguished actors of the past two-thirds of a century, and, when candidates for public favor on the stage were able to obtain the stamp of the Picayune's approval, they were happy in the confidence that it portended for them success and fame. Under Major Burbank's direction, the dramatic criticisms of the Picayune maintained their high character and potentiality, and it is worth recording that, while its dictum had availed to confer distinction, it was never used to crush and opress with condemnation.
    As a humorist, Major Burbank attained a national reputation. His vein was rather in the line of sparkling wit, with a dash of sarcasm, than in that of broad drollery and merriment; but he was not without a large share of genial fun. Tho brief and pointed paragraphs in which his flashing wit expressed itself often possessed the highest qualities of epigrams, and they were quoted far and wide.
    For nearly a quarter of a century, Major Burbank had been a most important factor in the daily production of the Picayune. His taking-away inflicts a severe loss upon this journal and upon its vast clientele of readers. It is, indeed, not too much to say that, with much varied and conspicuous talent in the staff of the paper, there is no one who can fill his place in many particulars. He married a Louisiana lady, with whom he lived a most devoted and beautiful life, and her loss is the greatest of all. He was deeply attached to the city of his adoption, and had endeared himself to a large circle of friends. Those who knew him best loved him most, and they can truly say that it will be long, if ever, before they will look upon his like again in this land of human sojourning and on this side of the dark river.
    May he rest from his labors as one who has done well his work in this life, and may the bereaved and most devotedly loved one find that peace which Heaven alone can give, while she waits in the hope of a most blessed rejoining and reunion. Amen!
  • He was buried in Jan 1901 at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana.
  • Ella, his wife, outlived Nathaniel and died on 25 Nov 1928 at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, at age 78.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Ella Electa Burbank b. Jan 1850, d. 25 Nov 1928

James Burgess

b. 30 April 1820, d. 8 April 1902
  • Father: Danforth Burgess b. 6 Oct 1796, d. 19 Dec 1883
  • Mother: Mary Ann Williams b. between 1805 - 1806
  • Company: H
  • James Burgess was born on 30 Apr 1820 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, son of Danforth Burgess and Mary Ann Williams.
  • On 29 Feb 1840 James Burgess, 19, declared an intention of marriage to Abigail Ward, 19, daughter of Harry Ward and Isabelle Morse, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James Burgess and Abigail Ward were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 2 Aug 1850 at Spencer, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    James Burgess, 30, boot maker, $1000 estate, b. RI
    Abigail, 29, b. MA (as were all others)
    William D., 9
    James M., 6
    Ferdinand Green, 21
    Henry Miller, 18, cotton operative
    Lurania Adams, 26
    Samuel Usher, 21, carpenter, b. CT.
  • In 1861 James was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, James gave his occupation as boot-treer.

  • On 25 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 41 years, 2 months and 25 days old.
  • On 31 Jan 1862 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts discharged due to disability.

  • He and Abigail Ward were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 8 Jul 1870 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Burgess, James, 50, hotel keeper, b. RI
    ---, Abigail, 50, b. MA
    ---, James S., 26, b. MA
    ---, Sarah, 24, b. NY (James' wife)
    (along with six employees and numerous guests.)
  • On 24 Feb 1873 Abigail Ward, his wife, died at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 52.
  • James Burgess was enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 20 Jun 1880 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Derx, Conrad, 80, husband, sick, b. Bavaria
    ---, Eleanor P., wife, b. MA
    **Burgess, James, 58, single (sic), caterer, b. RI
    as a boarder nextdoor to the household of:
    Bencke, Loyden D., 47, widow, keeps boarders, b. ME
    Burgess, Danforth, 87, husband, retired, b. RI (his father)
    ---, Mary, 75, wife, b. ME (his mother.)
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in Jun 1891, received certificate number 741264.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 7 Jun 1900 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Burgess, James, lodger, b. Apr 1820, 80, single, b. RI (as were his parents), retired pensioner
    (in a building with many other lodgers.)
  • He died on 8 Apr 1902 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was 81 years, 11 months and 9 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1902 at Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, Plot: G.A.R.-Lot,Row-7,South,Grave-12.
  • Last Edited: 12 Oct 2016

Family: Abigail Ward b. 5 Jul 1820, d. 24 Feb 1873

  • William Danforth Burgess b. 24 Jul 1840
  • Samuel James Burgess b. 5 Nov 1843

James F. Burgess

b. November 1832, d. 14 June 1912
  • Father: Nicholas Burgess b. between 1785 - 1786, d. 12 Nov 1872
  • Mother: Elizabeth Farrol b. between 1809 - 1810
  • Company: C
  • James F. Burgess was born in Nov 1832 at Bolton-le-Moors, Lancashire, England, son of Nicholas Burgess and Elizabeth Farrol.
  • James F. Burgess was enumerated in the household of Elizabeth Farrol in the 1851 UK Census in Apr 1851 at 1 Back Eden Street, North Bury, Bury, Lancashire, England, as:
    Elizabeth Burgess, head, married, 43, b. Lancashire, Over Halton
    John, son, 21, calico weaver, b. Lanc, Bolton
    **James, son, 17, piece plaiter, b. Lanc, Bolton
    Mary Ann, daur, 12, rag picker, b. Lanc, Bury
    **Thomas, son, 10, scholar, b. Lanc, Bury
    Elizabeth, daur, 5, scholar, b. Lanc, Bury
    Ann, daur, 3, b. Lanc, Bury
    Sarah, daur, 1, b. Lanc, Bury
    (Note: why the father is not enumerated here is unknown. He was also not enumerated with his family in 1841.)
  • James F. Burgess emigrated in 1854 from England likely with his family, and his then fiancee, Susanna, who arrived in America the same year.
  • On 1 May 1858 James F. Burgess, 25, married Susanna D. Hutchins, 17, daughter of George Hutchins and Mary Elizabeth [--?--], at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James F. Burgess was enumerated in the household of Elizabeth Burgess in the 1860 US Federal Census on 26 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Elizabeth BURGESS, 50, house keeping., b. England (as were all in family)
    Mary A., 22, warper
    **Thomas, 19, drier,
    Elizabeth, 16, warper
    Ann, 13
    Sarah, 9
    (and nine doors away...)
    **James BURGESS, 25, dresser, b. England
    Susanna, 23, b. England
    Amy M., 11/12, b. MA.
  • In 1861 James was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, James gave his occupation as dresser.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 28 years and 8 months old.
  • James F. Burgess and Thomas H. Burgess, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 7 Jan 1863 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He and Susanna D. Hutchins were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 25 Jun 1880 at Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, where he is a watchman, and daughter Amy lives with them.
  • James F. Burgess made application at Iowa for a veteran's pension on 17 May 1889, received certificate number 472835.
  • In 1896, James was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • In 1898, James was listed as a member of Crocker Post, No. 12, Department of Iowa, Grand Army of the Republic in the "Annals Of Polk County, Iowa And City Of Des Moines."
  • He and Susanna D. Hutchins were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 6 Jun 1900 at Lee, Polk County, Iowa, where he is a janitor, and daughter Amy lives with them. Of three children, only Amy is still living.
  • James F. Burgess and Susanna D. Hutchins were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 16 Apr 1910 at Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, with their daughter who has remained unmarried.
  • In 1911 Susanna D. Hutchins, his wife, died.
  • James F. Burgess died on 14 Jun 1912 at Polk County, Iowa. He was 79 years and 7 months old.
  • He was buried in Jun 1912 at Glendale Cemetery, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, in Plot: Blk 15, with his wife.
  • James's daughter, Amy Maude Burgess, died and was buried in 1924 at Glendale Cemetery, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, at age 64 years.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Family: Susanna D. Hutchins b. Sep 1840, d. 1911

  • Amy Maude Burgess b. 7 Aug 1859, d. 1924

Thomas H. Burgess

b. August 1840, d. 15 October 1926
  • Father: Nicholas Burgess b. between 1785 - 1786, d. 12 Nov 1872
  • Mother: Elizabeth Farrol b. between 1809 - 1810
  • Company: C
  • Thomas H. Burgess was born in Aug 1840 at Bury, Lancashire, England, son of Nicholas Burgess and Elizabeth Farrol.
  • Thomas H. Burgess was enumerated in the household of Elizabeth Farrol in the 1851 UK Census in Apr 1851 at 1 Back Eden Street, North Bury, Bury, Lancashire, England, as:
    Elizabeth Burgess, head, married, 43, b. Lancashire, Over Halton
    John, son, 21, calico weaver, b. Lanc, Bolton
    **James, son, 17, piece plaiter, b. Lanc, Bolton
    Mary Ann, daur, 12, rag picker, b. Lanc, Bury
    **Thomas, son, 10, scholar, b. Lanc, Bury
    Elizabeth, daur, 5, scholar, b. Lanc, Bury
    Ann, daur, 3, b. Lanc, Bury
    Sarah, daur, 1, b. Lanc, Bury
    (Note: why the father is not enumerated here is unknown. He was also not enumerated with his family in 1841.)
  • Thomas H. Burgess emigrated in 1860 from England according to the 1900 census.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Elizabeth Burgess in the 1860 US Federal Census on 26 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Elizabeth BURGESS, 50, house keeping., b. England (as were all in family)
    Mary A., 22, warper
    **Thomas, 19, drier,
    Elizabeth, 16, warper
    Ann, 13
    Sarah, 9
    (and nine doors away...)
    **James BURGESS, 25, dresser, b. England
    Susanna, 23, b. England
    Amy M., 11/12, b. MA.
  • In 1861 Thomas was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Thomas gave his occupation as operative.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Thomas mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years and 11 months old.
  • Thomas H. Burgess and James F. Burgess, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Thomas was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, on the wrist.
  • On 15 Nov 1862 Thomas ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability from wounds received in battle.

  • On 19 Sep 1863 Thomas H. Burgess, 23, married Jane B. Burns, 21, daughter of John Burns and Jane [--?--], at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Thomas H. Burgess made application for a veteran's pension in Dec 1863, and received certificate number 14694.
  • He and Jane B. Burns were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 4 Jun 1870 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Burgess, Thomas H., 29, works in gingham mill, b. England
    Jane, 28, b. Ireland
    Martha B., 6, b. MA
    John C., 3, b. MA
    Burne, William J., 24, milkman, b. Ireland (married previous May, possibly his brother-in-law)
    Mary A., 18, b. Michigan.
  • On 24 Dec 1887 Thomas and Jane's daughter, Martha B. Burgess married James McIntosh at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 6 Sep 1893 Thomas and Jane's daughter, Jennie May Burgess married John P. Mitchell at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Thomas H. Burgess and Jane B. Burns were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1900 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a "steam engineer."
  • Thomas H. Burgess and Jane B. Burns were enumerated in the 1920 US Federal Census on 24 Jan 1920 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Thomas H Burgess, 79, natl 1866, b. England
    Jane, 78, natl 1866, b. Ireland
    Frank Childs, 59, lodger, widower, b. MA, carder in woolen mill.
  • Thomas H. Burgess died on 15 Oct 1926 at Beverly, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was 86 years and 2 months old.
  • On 22 Oct 1926 at "The Webster Evening Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Thomas H. Burgess was remembered at the 60th reunion of Company I as among those who had died within the previous year. (click icon to read.)
  • Last Edited: 30 May 2011

Family: Jane B. Burns b. Nov 1841

  • Martha B. Burgess b. 6 May 1864
  • John Crawford Burgess b. 20 Jul 1866
  • Jennie May Burgess b. 7 Mar 1872

William H. Burgess

b. 14 January 1832, d. 16 May 1911
  • Father: Richard Burgess
  • Mother: Hannah Gladding
  • Company: H
  • William H. Burgess was born on 14 Jan 1832 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, son of Richard Burgess and Hannah Gladding.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as seaman.
  • William was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Corporal, being credited to the quota of Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 29 years, 5 months and 28 days old.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Western Gunboat Flotilla where he served as a bosun's mate on the Judge Torrence.

  • He ended his service with the Western Gunboat Flotilla by discharge on 18 Dec 1862.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burgess was reported as wounded at Gettysburg.
  • William H. Burgess married Hattie I. Dunbar.
  • William H. Burgess and Hattie I. Dunbar were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1880 at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • William H. Burgess was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at South Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company H, noting that he has malaria.
  • He and Hattie I. Dunbar were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 11 Jun 1900 at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Burgess, William H., head, b. Jan 1832, married 35 years, b.RI (his parents b. MA), finishes chair arms, they live in a home with a mortgage
    ---, Harriet, wife, b. Aug 1839, 3 of her 4 children still living, b. NJ (her parents b. MA)
    ---, Isabel G., dau, b. Sep 1871, upholsterer
    ---, Ida G., dau, b. Jan 1874, stenographer
    ---, Ralph E., son, b. Feb 1881, bookkeeper.
  • On 19 Jun 1901 William and Hattie's daughter, Isabel Gladding Burgess married William H. Green at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him (a widower) and the first for her.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burgess attended the 37th annual regimental reunion with some eighty other veterans.
  • On 22 Jun 1904 William and Hattie's daughter, Ida Gertrude Burgess married Eugene F. Langill at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1906 William was living at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Oct 1906 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burgess attended the 40th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 75 other veterans of the regiment. (Report believed to be from the Worcester Spy.)
  • William H. Burgess was also mentioned in attendance in the Fitchburg Sentinel coverage of the 1906 reunion.
  • He and Hattie I. Dunbar were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 29 Apr 1910 at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • William H. Burgess died on 16 May 1911 at Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 79 years, 4 months and 2 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1911 at Green Bower Cemetery, Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: 166.
  • On 29 May 1911 an unknown person applied for a pension to surviving family member, based on William's service; with application number 965909, but no certificate is recorded.
  • Hattie, his wife, outlived William and died in 1918.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Hattie I. Dunbar b. Aug 1839, d. 1918

  • Henry Guilford Burgess b. 15 Feb 1867
  • Isabel Gladding Burgess b. 10 Sep 1871, d. 1936
  • Ida Gertrude Burgess b. Jan 1874, d. 1961
  • Ralph Edwin Burgess b. 1 Feb 1881

James Burke

b. between 1823 and 1824
  • Company: No_SvcRec
  • James Burke was born between 1823 - 1824.

  • On 1 Aug 1862 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James deserted, according to an article in the Webster Times.
  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Burke was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts with no further service record in the 1870 roster.

  • According to Ford, men designated here as "No_SvcRec" were apparently "mustered into the service of the United States and assigned to the Fifteenth Regiment, but none of them have a record of service with that organization."
  • NOTE: The man who appears on the memorial tablets in the Library in Lancaster, MA, appears to be one James E. Burke, a farmer from Lawrence, MA, who was killed 1 Sep 1862, while serving with the 21st Massachusetts Infantry. He appears to be a different man then the one who appears on the enlistment rolls of the 15th MVI.
  • Last Edited: 18 Dec 2014

Henry Lewis Burnell

b. 18 March 1844, d. 24 December 1918
  • Father: Chauncey Lewis Burnell b. 22 Dec 1819
  • Mother: Rebecca Serena Longley b. 14 Oct 1814, d. 28 Mar 1888
  • Company: A
  • Henry Lewis Burnell was born on 18 Mar 1844 at Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Chauncey Lewis Burnell and Rebecca Serena Longley.
  • When about 2 years old, he was placed in the family of Benjamin F. Stone, a relative of his mother, with whom he lived in Lunenburg, Massachusetts, according to an autobiography he wrote in 1888.
  • Henry Lewis Burnell was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 29 Jun 1860 at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Benjm F. STONE, 58, blacksmith, b.MA and his wife
    Mary H., 56, b. ME
    **Henry L. Burnell, 16, b. MA (no occupation given)
    also
    Mary S. Smith, 20, b. MA
    Martha H. Nutting, 8, b. MA
    Jerry Haly, 18, b. Ireland.
  • In 1861 Henry was living at Shirley, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Henry gave his occupation as blacksmith.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Shirley, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was 17 years, 3 months and 24 days old.
  • On 17 Nov 1862 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts to enlist in the 1st U. S. Artillery.

  • Starting 18 Nov 1862, Henry also served in the 1st U. S. Artillery (regular Army) in Company I.
  • He ended his service on 25 Jun 1864 at Wilson's Landing, Virginia.
  • Chauncey Lewis Burnell , Henry's father, left his family.
  • In 1865 Henry Lewis Burnell moved from Massachusetts to Warren, Pennsylvania, where he commenced the study of Law in of the office of Judge L. D. Wetmore.
  • On 7 Feb 1868 Henry Lewis Burnell, 23, married Julia Emma Lawrence, 21, daughter of James H. Lawrence and Mary B. [--?--], at California, Branch County, Michigan.
  • On 2 May 1868 Henry's mother, Rebecca Serena Longley, remarried to Lewis Hamlet Seaver at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Henry Lewis Burnell and Julia Emma Lawrence were divorced.
  • On 11 Dec 1879 Henry Lewis Burnell, 35, married Wilhelmine Major, 27, daughter of William Major and Barbery [--?--], at Ithaca, Tompkins County, New York.
  • Henry Lewis Burnell and Wilhelmine Major were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1880 at Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan, as:
    Burnell, Henry L., 36, stenographer, b. MA
    ---, Minnie A., 28, wife, b. NY (parents b. Preussia)
    and two boarders
    James A MORRISON, single, 20, b. PA
    Eva J SUTHERLAND, single, 24, b. NJ.
  • On 21 Jun 1882 Henry's former wife, Julia Emma Lawrence remarried Charles Bowers Longley,who had served in the 23rd Massachusetts Infantry, in a second marriage for both, at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Dec 1887 his baby daughter, Florence Burnell, died at Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, at age 3.
  • On 25 Jun 1890 Henry's daughter, Amy Lawrence Burnell married Henry Edward Davis at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 12 May 1891 his grandson, Edward Lawrence Davis, son of Henry Edward Davis and Amy Lawrence Burnell, was born at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 22 Aug 1893 his married daughter, Amy Lawrence Burnell, died at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 23 of peretonitis.
  • In 1899, Henry was a contributor of a testimonial for a shorthand style. (click icon to read.)
  • He and Wilhelmine Major were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 13 Jun 1900 at Harrisburg City, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, as:
    Burnell, Henry L., b. Mar 1844, 56, married 20 years, b. MA (fat b. CT, mor b. MA), stenographer
    ---, Minnie, wife, b. Aug 1852, two of three children living, b. NY (parents b. Germany)
    ---, Leslie S., son, b. Dec 1880, 19, single, b. Ill, printer
    ---, Lewis M., son b. Apr 1882, 18, single, b. Ill, printer.
  • On 12 Dec 1901 at "The Worcester Daily Spy" Henry was mentioned as follows:
    Henry L. Burnell is now Commander --
    Henry L. Burnell, formerly of Company A, Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, now a risident of Harrisburg, Pa., has been elected commander of G. A. R. Post 116 of that place.
    Commander Burnell's residence, or the fact that he was alive, had not been known to many of his old comrades until he joined the Fifteenth Regiment excursion party of September 1900 at Harrisburg, en route to Gettysburg.
    Since then he has corresponded with some of them, who will be glad to hear of the new honor conferred upon him.
  • On 23 Jun 1903 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry and Henry Harrison Hosley were the subject of an article on their reunion.
    A Reunion of War Vetersns
    The Boston Globe, Sunday, published an interesting story of a reunion of two veterans after an absence of 39 years. Last Wednesday a similar meeting between two veterans took place in Remington & Co.'s bookbindery. The only difference in the circumstances was that the two who met here learned, in October last, of each other's whereabouts, although one did not expect a visit from the other. The parties referred to are Henry H. Hosley, bookbinder, and Harry L. Burnell of Harrisburg, Pa. The last time they saw each other was in front of Petersburg on July 10 1864.
    Both met when about 18 years old, enlisted in Co. A, of the 15th Mass. regiment, Mr. Hosley at Lancaster, where he lived, and Mr. Burnell, at Lunenburg, where he lived, in 1861. In 1861 both men were transferred to battery I of the 1st regiment, U. S. artillery, and they worked together and fought together side by side until they parted at City Point in front of Petersburg.
    After parting, the men lost track of each other and never saw or heard of each other until October last. That month Mr. Hosley attended the Balls Bluff reunion at Worcester. Somebody sent Mr. Burnell a copy of a Worcester paper containing an account of the reunion and the names of those present. Noticing the name Hosley, Mr. Burnell decided to write and ascertain if he were his old comrade. He found he was, but Mr. Hosley said he could not quite place him. Mr. Burnell replied that he remembered Mr. Hosley well, called to mind their poker games, foraging expeditions, and said he remembered Mr. Hosley's rotund figure, his philanthropy when he broke them at a game, and his mild bur picturesque profanity. Mr. Hosley finally placed him.
    Last Friday, a man entered the bindery and walking up to Mr. Hosley, held out his hand and said, "Hello, old man, I'm glad to see you."
    "I know you like a top," replied Mr. Hosley, grasping the outstretched hand, "but I can't just place you. Let me see, Oh, yes, you used to live in Lunenburg, and I got a letter from you. How are you?" and a vigorous handshaking followed.
    "Just as soon as I saw the back of your head I knew you," said Mr. Burnell.
    "I was never so glad to see anybody in my life," said Mr. Hosley, and the two old soldiers almost hugged each other.
    Needless to say, they retired to a corner and were soon deep in the memories of the past. They looked each other over, noticed how time had laid its hand on them and though tears were dangerously near the dropping point, they laughed and congratulated each other.
    Mr. Burnell is connected with the Harrisburg, Pa., Franklin Press, and has served his fellow citizens in congress as well as on the field. He is visiting a sister in Greenfield now, and on his return will go with Mr. Hosley to visit comrades in Leominster, Charlton and Lancaster.
  • Henry Lewis Burnell made application for a veteran's pension on 1 Mar 1906, and received certificate number 1121303.
  • He was not enumerated in the household of Lewis Morrill Burnell in the 1910 US Federal Census on 18 Apr 1910 at Seattle, King County, Washington, as:
    Burnell, Lewis M., head, 28, single, b. Ill, fat b. MA, bookkeeper
    ---, Wilhelmine M., mother 58, married b. NY
    ---, Garrison, Caroline M., aunt, 61, widowed, b. NY.
  • On 21 Jun 1911 Henry's son, Leslie Shaw Burnell married Lula L. T. Thomas at Washington County, Pennsylvania.
  • Henry Lewis Burnell died on 24 Dec 1918 at Oakland, Alameda County, California. He was 74 years, 9 months and 6 days old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1918 at North Cemetery, Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 11 Feb 1919 Wilhelmine Burnell received a pension to surviving family member in Washington based on Henry's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 891023.
  • On 1 May 1919 his grandson, Charles M. Burnell, son of Lewis Morrill Burnell and Marie Elisa Scearee, was born at Seattle, King County, Washington.
  • On 1 May 1919 his grandson, James B. Burnell, son of Lewis Morrill Burnell and Marie Elisa Scearee, was born at Seattle, King County, Washington.
  • Wilhelmine, his wife, outlived Henry and died on 1 Feb 1941 at Seattle, King County, Washington, at age 88.
  • Last Edited: 3 Oct 2016

Family 1: Julia Emma Lawrence b. 29 Jul 1846, d. Oct 1927

  • Amy Lawrence Burnell b. 9 Oct 1869, d. 22 Aug 1893
  • Harlan Lawrence Burnell b. 5 Aug 1871, d. 22 Dec 1943

Family 2: Wilhelmine Major b. 6 Aug 1852, d. 1 Feb 1941

  • Leslie Shaw Burnell b. 27 Dec 1880
  • Lewis Morrill Burnell b. 27 Apr 1882, d. May 1972
  • Florence Burnell b. 12 Feb 1884, d. 20 Dec 1887

Ansel Burnham

b. 12 September 1822, d. 24 November 1862
  • Father: Zebulon Burnham b. 21 Feb 1782, d. 21 Dec 1856
  • Mother: Judith Andrews b. 28 Feb 1785, d. 28 Apr 1863
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Ansel Burnham was born on 12 Sep 1822 at Essex County, Massachusetts, son of Zebulon Burnham and Judith Andrews.
  • On 24 Nov 1844 Ansel Burnham, 22, married Elizabeth W. Roberts, 20, daughter of John W. Roberts and Charlotte Kinsman, at Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Dec 1856 his father, Zebulon Burnham, died at Essex, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 74.
  • Ansel Burnham and Elizabeth W. Roberts were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1860 at North Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Ansel Burnham, 36, farmer, b. MA
    Elizabeth W., 35
    Jacob A., 15, farm labor
    Silas R., 11
    Parker P., 7
    George W., 4
    Alonzo P., 2
    Charles W. Teel, 37, day labor, b. NH.
  • In 1861 Ansel was living at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Ansel gave his occupation as Farmer.

  • On 19 Mar 1862 Ansel Burnham mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 39 years, 6 months and 7 days old.
  • In support of the widow's application for a pension, Henry Martin, 1st Lt., Andrew Sharpshooters, wrote that Ansel Burnham "while on board of a transport bound from Newport News to Alexandria, Va, on or about August 21st 1862 became ill of diarrhea which however did not so disable him but that he continued with the Company through the second battle of Bull Run and unt its arrival at Tenleytown. When the Company left Tenleytown said Burnham undertook to march with it but having proceeded about two miles was obliged to fall out having become extremely feeble. He was accordingly sent to Eckington Hospital Washington DC, where he died Nov 24th 1862."
  • He died on 24 Nov 1862 at Eckington Hospital, Washington, DC, of disease. He was 40 years, 2 months and 12 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1862 at Military Asylum Cemetery, Soldiers' Home National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, Site F 1704.
  • On 26 Dec 1862 Elizabeth W. Roberts received a pension to surviving family member based on Ansel's service; his wife received certificate number 4110.
  • Elizabeth W. Burnham was enumerated as the widow of Ansel Burnham, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 4 Oct 1890 Parker Pilsbury Burnham, his son, applied for a pension, stating "that he was and has been a cripple from birth; is completely helpless and unable to support himself and is dependant upon his mother's charity for support." However the request was denied since he was past the age of sixteen years when the law for authorization of such pensions was passed.
  • Elizabeth, his wife, outlived Ansel and died on 28 Apr 1895 at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 70.
  • On 29 Feb 1896, Elizabeth W. Roberts, his widow, was dropped from the pension rolls as deceased.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Family: Elizabeth W. Roberts b. 17 Aug 1824, d. 28 Apr 1895

  • Jacob Ansel Burnham b. 22 Mar 1845
  • Silas Roberts Burnham b. 5 Oct 1849
  • Parker Pilsbury Burnham b. 5 Jun 1853, d. 9 Dec 1895
  • George Willie Burnham b. 15 Aug 1855
  • Alonzo P. Burnham b. 9 Jul 1859

Hiram Burnham

b. 27 August 1820, d. 30 November 1903
  • Father: Jonathan Burnham b. 13 Dec 1775, d. 22 Sep 1854
  • Mother: Chloe Babcock b. 12 Jan 1796, d. 12 Jul 1828
  • Company: I
  • Hiram Burnham was born on 27 Aug 1820 at Massachusetts, son of Jonathan Burnham and Chloe Babcock.
  • On 12 Jul 1828 his mother, Chloe Babcock, died at age 32.
  • Hiram Burnham was enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census in Aug 1850 at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, Hiram Burnham, 27, b. MA, living in the household of Marshal Miner, a farmer. Relationship, if any, unknown.
  • On 29 Aug 1854 Hiram Burnham, 34, married Clara Brown, 26, at Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut.
  • On 22 Sep 1854 his father, Jonathan Burnham, died at age 78.
  • Hiram Burnham and Clara Brown were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 25 Jun 1860 at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    Hiram Burnham 39, farmer, $400 real estate, $110 personal estate, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Clara, 32
    Alsada, 4 (f)
    Damian, 3, (f.)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Hiram gave his occupation as farmer.
  • In 1861 Hiram was living at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts.

  • On 14 Oct 1861 Hiram mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 41 years, 1 month and 17 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 30 Jun 1862 at Nelson's Farm, Virginia.
  • Thomas Blasland wrote a letter on 6 Jul 1862, mentioning Hiram Burnham, as follows: for publication in the Southbridge Journal.
  • On 26 Sep 1862 Hiram ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 15 Sep 1863, received certificate number 554302.
  • He and Clara Brown were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 6 Aug 1870 at Windsor, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, with their two sons, where he is a farmer.
  • On 16 Feb 1881 Clara Brown, his wife, died at age 52.
  • Hiram Burnham was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 1 Jun 1900 at Colchester, New London County, Connecticut, where he is 79 and a boarder in the house of one Charles Clark, 55, b. CT. His son Darwin lives elsewhere in Colchester and is unmarried at age 42.
  • He died on 30 Nov 1903. He was 83 years, 3 months and 3 days old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1903 at Westchester Cemetery, Colchester, New London County, Connecticut, with his wife and the inscription "age 83 yrs, Co I-15th Regt, Mass Vol. Inf. Veteran cl-65."
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2016

Family: Clara Brown b. 28 Mar 1828, d. 16 Feb 1881

  • Alsada Burnham b. 25 Jul 1855
  • Darwin Burnham b. 10 Jan 1857, d. 24 Sep 1949

William H. Burnham

b. 29 April 1838, d. 21 September 1915
  • Father: William C. Burnham
  • Mother: Hester R. Risley
  • Company: K
  • William H. Burnham was born on 29 Apr 1838 at Oakland, Hartford County, Connecticut, son of William C. Burnham and Hester R. Risley.
  • In 1861 William was living at Oakland, Hartford County, Connecticut.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, William gave his occupation as operative.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Oakland, Hartford County, Connecticut. He was 23 years, 2 months and 2 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 William was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burnham was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burnham was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, William H. Burnham was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 4 Mar 1862 William H. Burnham, 23, married Mary Kern, 25, daughter of Maria [--?--], at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to expiration of term of service.

  • He and Mary Kern were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 24 Aug 1870 at Greenville P. O., Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, as:
    Burnham, William H., works in Mod. Mill, b. CT
    ---, Mary, 31, b. NY
    ---, William C., 3, b. CT.
  • William H. Burnham and Mary Kern were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 21 Jun 1880 at Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a laborer, and suffering consumption.
  • William H. Burnham made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 29 Mar 1890, and received certificate number 955662.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. K.
  • He and Mary Kern were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1900 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a teamster, and they live in a rented home. Of her two children, both are still living. (noted: her parents are from Germany.)
  • On 21 Aug 1901 his son, Charles H. Burnham, died at Guanajay, Cuba, at age 26 of a gunshot wound, as a soldier.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burnham attended the 37th annual regimental reunion with some eighty other veterans.
  • In 1906 William was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Oct 1906 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William H. Burnham attended the 40th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 75 other veterans of the regiment. (Report believed to be from the Worcester Spy.)
  • He and Mary Kern were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census in Apr 1910 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Burnham, William H., 73, married 49 years, b. CT (as were his parents), teamster, trucking; they live in a rented home.
    ---, Mary, wife, 74, one of her two children is living, b. NY of German parents.
  • William H. Burnham died on 21 Sep 1915 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of throat cancer. He was 77 years, 4 months and 23 days old.
  • He was buried on 23 Sep 1915 at Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 8 Jun 2016

Family: Mary Kern b. Oct 1836, d. after 1915

  • William C. Burnham b. Dec 1867, d. 1951
  • Charles H. Burnham b. 3 Mar 1875, d. 21 Aug 1901

George E. Burns

b. 31 January 1823, d. 14 July 1863
  • Father: John Burns b. 1783, d. before 1850
  • Mother: Rhoda Hunt b. 24 Apr 1794, d. 26 Mar 1850
  • Company: G
  • George E. Burns was born on 31 Jan 1823 at Lenox, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, son of John Burns and Rhoda Hunt.
  • George E. Burns married Mary J. [--?--]
  • George E. Burns and Mary J. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 13 Aug 1850 at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George Burns, 28, dresser tender, b. MA (as were all)
    Mary, 27, b. ME
    Charles, 2
    Henry, 6/12
    Martha, 15 (his sister.)
  • Mary J. [--?--], his wife, died.
  • On 9 Sep 1858 George E. Burns, 35, married Ann Crane, daughter of James Winter and Ann [--?--], at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both. (She was the widow Crane.)
  • George E. Burns and Ann Winter were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 18 Jul 1860 at Millbury P. O., Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George E. Burns, 37, dresser tender, b. MA
    Ann, 36, b. Ireland
    Charles, 11, b. MA (as were all the children)
    Eugene, 9
    Elanson, 7
    Thomas Crane, 13
    Martin Crane, 5
    George M. Burns, 1.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as operative.
  • In 1861 George was living at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 9 Dec 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 38 years, 10 months and 9 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 17 Sep 1862 at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 4 Jul 1863 George was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, on the right thigh.
  • He died on 14 Jul 1863 at Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, of wounds. He was 40 years, 5 months and 14 days old.
  • He was buried in 1863 at Soldiers National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, Sec. D Grave # 9.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George E. Burns was reported as wounded at Gettysburg.
  • On 9 Aug 1863 A. Kennington made application for a pension as guardian to George's surviving dependants, and received certificate number 137751. Note: dates difficult to read, and name could also be HENNINGTON.
  • Ann, his wife, outlived George and died on 15 Aug 1863 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption.
  • He was "administrativly" transferred to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in the 1870 roster. This is clearly an administrative error.
  • Last Edited: 9 Sep 2016

Family 1: Mary J. [--?--] b. 1823

  • Charles E. Burns b. 7 Jul 1848, d. 7 Apr 1867
  • Eugene Augustus Burns b. 12 Jul 1850, d. 14 Aug 1923
  • Elanson Burns b. between 1852 - 1853

Family 2: Ann Winter b. between 1827 - 1828, d. 15 Aug 1863

  • George M. Burns b. between 1858 - 1859

George E. Burns 2nd

b. 6 March 1836, d. 15 November 1862
  • Father: John B. Burns d. before 1850
  • Mother: Sarah [--?--] b. between 1796 - 1797
  • Company: G
  • George E. Burns was born on 6 Mar 1836 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of John B. Burns and Sarah [--?--].
  • On 22 Nov 1855 George E. Burns, 19, married Rosella Cross Lassell, 15, daughter of Jeremiah Lassell and Sarah Payson, at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • George E. Burns and Rosella Cross Lassell were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 13 Jun 1860 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as:
    George E. Burns, 25, carpenter, b. MA
    Rosella F., 20, b. ME
    Ella, 3, b. MA
    Joseph W., 21, painter, b. MA
    Sarah, 63, widow, b. NH.
  • On 28 Aug 1861 Joseph W. Burns, his brother, enlisted in the 19th Massachusetts Infantry, and was wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, VA, transferring to the VRC 1 Sep 1864.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as carpenter.
  • In 1862 George was living at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 30 Jul 1862 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 4 months and 24 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 George was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, in the leg and thigh.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 George was taken prisoner at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 24 Sep 1862, at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, George was was mentioned among the wounded and sick entered at Camp Curtin, Harrisburgh, Penn., Sep. 22, 1862. He was wounded in the leg.
  • On 22 Oct 1862 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George E. Burns 2nd was mentioned, together with 20 others, among the wounded at the Patent Office hospital in Washington, D.C.
  • On 24 Oct 1862, George was returned and mustered in absent.
  • He died on 15 Nov 1862 of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam. He was 26 years, 8 months and 9 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1862 at Pine Grove Cemetery, Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 13 Dec 1862 his son, George Edward Burns, was born at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Feb 1863 Rosella Cross Lassell received a pension to surviving family member based on George's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 5726.
  • About in 1866 George's widow, Rosella Cross Burns remarried James A. Jordan.
  • On 21 Nov 1867 James A. Jordan made application for a pension as guardian to George E. Burns 2nd's surviving dependants, and received certificate number 106406.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Rosella Cross Lassell in the 1880 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1880 at Cumberland, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Jordan, Rose, 46, married, b. ME (of ME parents)
    Burns, Ella, 22, daur, works in thread mill, b. ME (of ME parents)
    ---, Lucius L., 19, son, laborer, b. MA (of ME parents)
    ---, George E., 17, son, laborer, b. MA (of ME parents)
    Jordan, Nina, daur, 1, b. RI (fat b. RI, mor b. ME
    nextdoor to:
    Jordan, George A., 48, works in cotton mill, b. RI (of RI parents)
    ---, Deborah, 49, wife, b. MA (of MA parents)
    ---, George H., 18, son, laborer, b. RI (fat b. RI, mor b. MA.)
  • On 3 Jul 1883 George and Rosella's son, Lucius Sargent Burns married Anne Mary Calhoun at Attleboro, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
  • On 15 Apr 1885 George and Rosella's daughter, Ella Frances Burns married William Henry Fish at Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 George Burns was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • George's wife, Rosella Cross Lassell, died and was buried in Mar 1916 at Moshassuck Cemetery, Central Falls, Providence County, Rhode Island, at age 75 years and 11 months.
  • There are two George E. Burns in Co. G of the 15th. The designation "2nd" in this project is based on Ford's history and the MASSCW. However, it appears that the designation is switched in the pension file index.
    Based on the date of widow's pension application by Rosella (Feb 1863), she can only be the widow of the man who died at Antietam.
    The dates of the George E. Burns in the Pine Grove Cemetery, Grafton, correspond to this man, saying his mother was Sarah.
    Using the dates, his mother's name, his wife's first name and his occupatioin, it appears that he is indeed the man in the 1860 census in Boston.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Rosella Cross Lassell b. 6 Mar 1840, d. 7 Mar 1916

  • Ella Frances Burns b. 30 Jun 1857, d. 5 Mar 1933
  • Lucius Sargent Burns b. 26 Oct 1861, d. 24 Nov 1929
  • George Edward Burns b. 13 Dec 1862

James Burns

b. between 1835 and 1836, d. 2 January 1862
  • Company: K
  • James Burns was born between 1835 - 1836 at Ireland.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, James gave his occupation as operative.
  • In 1861 James was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Sep 1861 James was wounded.
  • He died on 2 Jan 1862 at Poolesville, Maryland, of disease, according to the MASSCW.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, J. B. Burns was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • He died on 9 Sep 1863 at Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, of wounds, according to the 1870 roster.
  • Last Edited: 9 Sep 2016