Louis Bandin

b. between 1832 and 1833
  • Company: A
  • Louis Bandin was born between 1832 - 1833 at France.
  • In 1863 Louis was living at New York, New York.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Louis gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • He was married at the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts according to Ford's history.

  • On 5 Aug 1863 Louis mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company A, being credited to the quota of Beverly, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 16 Apr 1864 Louis ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Stevensburg, Culpeper County, Virginia, by desertion.

  • Last Edited: 1 Sep 2012

Sumner Hiram Banister

b. 7 November 1843, d. 17 January 1922
  • Father: Hiram Banister b. 14 May 1806, d. 4 Sep 1882
  • Mother: Mary Dodge Taft Buxton b. 25 Nov 1811, d. 25 Aug 1888
  • Company: F
  • Sumner Hiram Banister was born on 7 Nov 1843 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Hiram Banister and Mary Dodge Taft Buxton.
  • Sumner Hiram Banister was enumerated in the household of Hiram Banister and Mary Dodge Taft Buxton in the 1850 US Federal Census in Aug 1850 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Hirum Banniester, 41, laborer, b. MA (as were all in family)
    Mary B., 38
    Andrew C., 15, farmer
    Catherine, 9
    **Sumner, 6
    Mary, 4
    Furman (m), 1.
  • Sumner Hiram Banister was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 30 Jul 1860 at West Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, enumerated living in the household of:
    Oliver Kendrick, 21, shoemaker, b. MA (as were all in family)
    Mary A., 20
    Harley E., 8/12
    Mary Bennett, 54
    Emory W., 22, shoemaker
    **Sumner Banister, 17, shoemaker, b. CT (sic.)
  • In 1861 Sumner was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Sumner gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Sumner mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 17 years, 8 months and 5 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, where he was apparently captured and sent to Libby Prison.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sumner Hiram Banister was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sumner H. Bannister was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • Sumner Hiram Banister and Francis Andrew Barnes, first-cousins, grandsons of Andrew and Susanna (Chase) Buxton, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • On 22 Nov 1862 Sumner ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 28 Apr 1866 Sumner Hiram Banister, 22, married Lucy Miller, 17, daughter of Francis Miller and Elizabeth [--?--], at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Sumner Banister and Lucy Miller were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 12 Aug 1870 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Banister (sic), Sumner, 26, for boot factory, $300 personal property, b. MA
    ---, Lucy, 21, b. CT
    ---, Hiram, 3, b. MA
    ---, Litta, 6/12. b. MA
    Rice, William, 17, for boot factory, b. MA.
  • Sumner Hiram Banister made application for a veteran's pension on 28 Jul 1879, and received certificate number 411030.
  • He and Lucy Miller were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 14 Jun 1880 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with five children, but copy is too pale to read clearly.
  • On 21 Sep 1880 Lucy Miller, his wife, died at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 32 of consumption.
  • On 26 May 1888 Sumner and Lucy's daughter, Lillia A. Banister married Austin Spooner at West Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1890 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sumner Hiram Banister was (or had been) a member of the Ferdinand Dexter G. A. R., Post 38, and a copy of his "personal war sketch" is now located in the Merrick Public Library.
  • Click icon to read his G. A. R. personal sketch.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. F, where it mentions that he spent five months in Libby Prison.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 21 Jun 1900 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Banister, Sumner, b. NOv 1843, widower, b. MA, shoemaker
    ---, Harry S., son, b. Jan 1873, single, b. MA, farm laborer
    ---, Emma E., daur, b. jan 1875, single, b. MA
    ---, Alice P., daur, b. Apr 1877, single, b. MA, school teacher.
  • On 9 Dec 1900 Sumner and Lucy's daughter, Alice Percis Banister married Arthur Robert Coughlin at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Sumner Banister was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 2 May 1910 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, living on "the Road to Long Hill", a widower, farming with his unmarried son, Harry.
  • On 18 Sep 1917 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sumner Hiram Banister attended a reunion of Company F. From The Worcester Evening Post, September 18, 1917 (Volume XXXV # 143)
    FIFTEEN MEMBERS ATTEND REUNION
    F. Co., 15th Mass. Volunteer Infantry
    F Company, Fifteenth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry had its 50th annual reunion yesterday in the Warren Hotel. Dinner was served at noon, followed by speaking. James L. Callahan of Marlboro, president of the organization, called the meeting to order, afterward resigning the chair to Col. Henry E. Smith, who was elected permanet president. George W. Ward, secretary and treasurer, was also given a permanent tenure of office. The assosiation voted to dispense with its board of directors, leaving all of the responsibilities to the president and secretary.
    Each of the 15 members present and guests contributed to the program of after dinner remarks. other speakers gave anecdotes of the Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862.
    These members were present, James L. Callahan of Marlboro, Everett A. Hibbard of Berlin, Benjamin Stevens of North Brookfield, Porter Walbridge of Wales, David Reekie of Boylston Center, Henry H. Slate, of Charlton Depot, Elbridge Doane of Joplin Mo., Col. Henry Smith, Sumner H. Bannister, A. F. Earle and George W. Ward, all of Worcester.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Arthur Robert Coughlin and Alice Percis Banister in the 1920 US Federal Census on 15 Jan 1920 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Couglin, Arthur R., head, 50, b. VT, an agent at an express company
    ---, Alice P., wife, 42, b. MA (Sumner's daughter)
    **Banister, Sumner H., father-in-law, 76.
  • On 26 Jun 1920 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sumner Hiram Banister attended the 53rd reunion of Companies E, I and F of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment. (click icon to read report.)
  • He died on 17 Jan 1922 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 78 years, 2 months and 10 days old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1922 at Brookfield Cemetery, Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: M 186.
  • Last Edited: 12 Aug 2016

Family: Lucy Miller b. 10 Jun 1848, d. 21 Sep 1880

  • Hiram F. Banister b. 26 Feb 1867, d. 14 Jun 1886
  • Lillia A. Banister b. 29 Nov 1869, d. 6 Apr 1939
  • Harry S. Banister b. 20 Jan 1873, d. 7 Dec 1915
  • Emma E. Banister b. 14 Jan 1875, d. 1962
  • Alice Percis Banister b. Apr 1877, d. 1952

Thomas Barclay

b. between 1841 and 1842
  • Company: B
  • Thomas Barclay was born between 1841 - 1842 at Scotland.
  • In 1863 Thomas was living at Montreal, Canada.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Thomas gave his occupation as stone cutter.

  • On 31 Jul 1863 Thomas mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Chesterfield, New London County, Connecticut.
  • He was declared missing in action in May 1864 at The Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, with no later record found, according to the MASSCW.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Thomas ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, but no record was found after he went missing at The Wilderness.

  • On 27 Jul 1864 Thomas Barclay appeared on the muster rolls of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as having officially transferred into the unit, but he was not assigned to a specific company.
  • In 1880 Thomas is not identifiable in the 1880 LDS census index.
  • Last Edited: 18 Dec 2014

Peter Bard

b. April 1835, d. 6 March 1919
  • Father: Peter Bard b. 1793, d. 22 Aug 1873
  • Mother: Mary [--?--] b. 1800, d. 23 May 1870
  • Company: A
  • Peter Bard was born in Apr 1835 at Canada (French), son of Peter Bard and Mary [--?--].
  • Peter Bard emigrated in 1851 from Canada (French).
  • On 25 Mar 1858 Peter Bard Jr., 22, married Marietta Cressey, 19, daughter of Jason Cressey and Louisa Wheeler, at North Adams, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Peter Bard and Mary [--?--] were enumerated near by in the 1860 US Federal Census on 20 Jul 1860 at Adams, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    Peter BARD, Jr., 25, day laborer, $50 personal property, b. Canada
    Mary E., 21, b. NH
    and not far away ...
    Peter BARD, 60, day laborer, $40 personal estate, b. Canada (as were all in family)
    Mary, 48
    Deffors, (?) 23, (m), hostler.
  • In 1861 Peter was living at Colrain, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1861 Peter Bard was a carpenter.
  • Starting 21 Jun 1861, Peter also served in the 10th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company H.
  • He ended his service by transfer to the Navy on 18 Feb 1862.
  • Starting 21 Feb 1862, Peter also served in the Navy.
  • He ended his service by discharge, after service on the U. S. S. Cinncinatti and the U. S. S. Clara Dolsen, with the rank of Seaman on 9 Dec 1862.
  • In 1863 Peter was living at Shelburne, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Peter gave his occupation as mechanic.

  • On 28 Jul 1863 Peter mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Buckland, Franklin County, Massachusetts. He was 28 years and 3 months old.
  • On 22 Jun 1864 Peter was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Peter ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, while absent as a Prisoner of War.

  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Peter Bard was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • Starting 26 Nov 1864, Peter also served in the 20th MVI having been returned as an exchanged prisoner.
  • He ended his service on 16 Jul 1865.
  • On 11 Nov 1866 Marietta Cressey, his wife, died at Hawley, Franklin County, Massachusetts, at age 27 of disease of lungs.
  • On 2 May 1867 Peter Bard, 32, married Amelia C. Bohmer, 22, daughter of Frederick Boehmer and Elizabeth C. Rundle, at Halifax, Vermont.
  • Peter Bard and Amelia C. Bohmer were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 9 Jul 1870 at Cheshire, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as:
    BARD, Peter, 35, house painter, $150 in personal estate, b. Canada
    ---, Amelia, 26, b. MA
    ---, Nellie G., 9 (f), b. MA (step-child?)
    EAGAN, Michael, 55, laborer, b. Ireland.
  • On 16 Feb 1871 Amelia C. Bohmer, his wife, died at Greenfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, at age 26.
  • On 30 Jun 1874 Peter Bard, 39, married Jane Cooper, 22, daughter of William Cooper and Maria [--?--], at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, his third marriage and her first.
  • Peter Bard made application for a veteran's pension on 26 Apr 1879, received certificate number 240814, noting also that there was service in the Navy.
  • He and Jane Cooper were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 25 Jun 1880 at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, as:
    Bard, Petter, 45, painter, b. Canada
    ---, Jannie, 26, wife, b. England
    ---, Ella G., 5, daur, b. MA
    ---, Jannie L., 2, daur, b. MA
    Karby, Mary E., 19, boarder, b. MA (fath b. Can, mor b. MA.)
  • On 10 Dec 1898 Peter and Jane's daughter, Ivy M. Bard married Herbert E. Allen at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 18 Apr 1900 Peter and Jane's daughter, Jennie Bard married Gilbert H. Mumford at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Peter Bard and Jane Cooper were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 5 Jun 1900 at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, as:
    Bard, Peter, b. Apr 1835, 65, married 26 years, b. Canada (Fr.) (and his parents), immig 1841, painter
    ---, Jane, wife, b. Apr 1852, 48, all five children living, b. England (and her parents), immig 1871
    ---, Alice, daur, b. Mar 1882, b. MA
    ---, Medor Edw., son b. Jan 1889, b. MA
    Mumford, Bert, son-in-law, b. Feb 1879, married within the year, b. MA (and his parents) carpet weaver
    ---, Jane, daur, b. Oct 1877, no children b. MA, whip plaiter.
  • On 30 Mar 1904 Peter and Jane's daughter, Ivy M. Bard married Arthur W. Howes at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her.
  • On 10 Jan 1906 Peter and Jane's daughter, Alice Mabel Bard married Arthur L. Mullet at Agawam, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 21 Jun 1907 his granddaughter, Viola May Mullet, daughter of Arthur L. Mullet and Alice Mabel Bard, was born at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts.
  • Peter Bard and Jane Cooper were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 21 Apr 1910 at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, as:
    Bard, Peter, 75, married 3rd for 39 years, b. Can, immig 1851, painter
    ---, Jane, wife, 58, married first, all five children living
    Howes, Arthur, son-in-law, 27, married six years, b. MA, whipmaker
    ---, Ivy M., daur, 28, no children
    Bard Alice, daur, 25, single
    Bard, Viola, daur (sic), 3, single, b. MA.
  • Peter Bard died on 6 Mar 1919 at Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts. He was 83 years and 11 months old.
  • He was buried in Mar 1919 at Pine Hill Cemetery, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 20 Apr 2016

Family 1: Marietta Cressey b. 26 Jan 1839, d. 11 Nov 1866

Family 2: Amelia C. Bohmer b. 17 Dec 1844, d. 16 Feb 1871

Family 3: Jane Cooper b. Apr 1852

  • Gertrude Bard b. 1 Mar 1875
  • Jennie Bard b. 18 Oct 1877
  • Ivy M. Bard b. 1881
  • Alice Mabel Bard b. 11 Mar 1883
  • Medor Edward Bard b. 7 Jan 1888, d. 17 Aug 1916

Joseph Bardsley

b. 1826, d. 2 July 1863
  • Company: I
  • Joseph Bardsley was also known as Joseph Beardsley in his military records.
  • He was born about in 1826 at England.
  • On 6 Dec 1853 Joseph Bardsley married Mercy Miller, 47, at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her.
  • Joseph Bardsley and Mercy Miller were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 9 Jul 1860 at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Joseph Basley (sic), 48, operative, b. England
    Mercy, 53, b. ME
    Bemis, 17, shoemaker, b. ME
    Vilyora, 15, b. ME
    Frances, 11, b. ME
    Mary, 10, b. ME
    **Levi, 26, shoemaker, b. ME
    Emeline, 26, b. NY
    Viola, 3, b. MA.
  • In 1862 Joseph was living at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Joseph gave his occupation as spinner.
  • Alpheus Remick and Levi Remick, Joseph Bardsley, and Augustus Moses Remick, three brothers and their step-father, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company I.

  • On 28 Jul 1862 Joseph mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 36 years old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Joseph was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • He died on 2 Jul 1863 at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, killed in action. He was 37 years old.
  • On 10 Jul 1863 Mercy Miller received a pension to surviving family member based on Joseph's service; his wife, received certificate number 8957.
  • In 1863 Mercy Miller, his wife, was applying for a widow's pension and stated "that she now has 13 children living, seven of them are now in the army in various regiments."
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph Bardsley was listed as a casualty of Gettysburg.
  • He was buried in Jul 1863 at Soldiers National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, Sec. D Grave # 6.
  • He and Mercy Miller had no issue.
  • Joseph Bardsley's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Augustus Remick and Emma Augusta Whittaker in the 1870 US Federal Census on 16 Aug 1870 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Remick, A., 27, laborer, b. MA (sic)
    ---, Emily, 22
    ---, Lilla A., 4
    ---, Mercy B., 2
    (in the same house)
    Bardsley, Mercy, 65
    ---, Fidelia, 4.
  • Joseph Bardsley's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Mercy Miller in the 1880 US Federal Census on 1 Jun 1880 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as: Bardsley, Mercy, 71, widow, b. ME, living alone.
  • Mercy, his wife, outlived Joseph and died on 22 Feb 1889 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 82.
  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2016

Family: Mercy Miller b. 15 Aug 1806, d. 22 Feb 1889

James Barker

b. between 1840 and 1841
  • Company: I
  • James Barker was born between 1840 - 1841 at Ireland.
  • In 1861 James was living at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, James gave his occupation as laborer.

  • On 15 May 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 James Barker was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 10 Aug 1862 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts for disability.

  • On 4 Jul 1907 James Barker was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • In 1909 James Barker was included on the Civil War memorial at Dudley, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 1 Sep 2012

Samuel Sprague Barker

b. September 1838, d. 19 January 1917
  • Father: Asa Burditt Barker b. 17 Dec 1797, d. 27 Jan 1878
  • Mother: Mary Gould Cushing b. 1806
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Samuel Sprague was an alias he used in the Maryland Cavalry.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker was born in Sep 1838 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of Asa Burditt Barker and Mary Gould Cushing.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker was enumerated in the household of Asa Burditt Barker and Mary Gould Cushing in the 1850 US Federal Census in 1850 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as:
    Asa B Bunker (sic), 51, laborer, b. MA (as were all)
    Mary G., 47
    William T., 23, sailor
    Thomas G., 16
    Ann M., 14
    Mary F., 9
    **Samuel P., 10
    Susan A., 5
    Lydia A., 3
    Abigail Philipps, 67.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker was enumerated in the household of Asa Burditt Barker and Mary Gould Cushing in the 1860 US Federal Census on 27 Jun 1860 at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Asa A Barker, 64, farm labor,b. MA (as were all)
    Mary G., 54
    **Samuel L., 21, shoemaker
    Mary F., 18
    Susan A., 16
    Abigail Phillips, 79.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Samuel gave his occupation as Sailor.
  • In 1861 Samuel was living at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 16 Apr 1861 Samuel enlisted.
  • Starting 1 May 1861, Samuel also served in the 5th Massachusetts Infantry, Company B.
  • He ended his service with the 5th Massachusetts Infantry, Company B, by discharge on 31 Jul 1861 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

  • On 3 Sep 1861 Samuel S. Barker mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 23 years old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Samuel ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters at Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, by desertion, according to the 1870 AG report.

  • Starting 19 Aug 1864, Samuel also served in the 1st PHB Cavalry Regiment Maryland, Company D.
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 25 Jun 1865.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Asa Burditt Barker and Mary Gould Cushing in the 1870 US Federal Census on 28 Jun 1870 at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Asa B Barker, 74, laborer, b. MA
    Mary G., 68, wife
    Samuel S., 32, shoemaker
    Adaline, 23
    Abagail Phillips, 89.
  • On 27 Apr 1871 Samuel's sister, Susan B. Barker, married Frederick S. Jackson at Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker was enumerated in the household of Mary Gould Cushing in the 1880 US Federal Census on in 1880 at at Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Mary G. Barker, 79, widow, b. MA (as were all)
    **Samuel S., 41, son, unmarried, shoemaker
    Adelaide A. Moulton, 31, daur, married
    Irving F.R. Moulton, 8, grand-son.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 8 Sep 1891, based on his service in the Maryland Cavalry, but no certificate is recorded.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Herceliar Barker and Samuel D. Skilton in the 1900 US Federal Census on 3 Jun 1900 at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, as:
    Samuel Skilten, 84, married 50 years, b. May 1816, capitalist, b. MA (as were all)
    Hercelia, 68, wife, b. Apr 1832, all three children living
    Ella F., 79, daur, b. Aug 1850, single
    William F., 44, son, b. Oct 1855, single, dealer in shoe findings
    **Samuel S. Barker, 61, bro-in-law, b. Sep 1838, single
    Mary Gill, 18, servant, b. Jan 1882 in Ireland.
  • Samuel Sprague Barker died on 19 Jan 1917 at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was 78 years and 4 months old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1917 at Phipps Street Burying Ground, Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, according to his death certiicate.
  • Last Edited: 23 Sep 2016

James Cobb Barlow

b. 27 April 1833, d. 15 May 1919

James C. Barlow
  • Father: Warren Bacon Barlow b. 12 Oct 1798
  • Mother: Thankful Weeks b. 29 Mar 1797, d. 4 Oct 1879
  • Company: C
  • James Cobb Barlow was born on 27 Apr 1833 at Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine, son of Warren Bacon Barlow and Thankful Weeks.
  • His father, Warren Bacon Barlow, died.
  • On 2 Jul 1842 James and Otis's widowed mother, Thankful Weeks, remarried to George W. Gibbs, 45, at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
  • James Cobb Barlow was enumerated in the household of George W. Gibbs and Thankful Weeks in the 1850 US Federal Census on 3 Aug 1850 at North Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Betsey Everett, 61, b. MA
    Mary W., 26, b. RI
    William B., 33, shoemaker, b. MA
    George W Gibbs, 58, teamster, b. MA
    Thankful, 52, b. MA
    Otis W. Barlow, 20, laborer, b. RI
    **James C. Barlow, 17, laborer, b. ME
    Angenette Cobb, 15, b. RI.
  • On 15 Mar 1856 James Cobb Barlow, 22, married Sarah M. Stone, 25, daughter of Simon Stone and Sally Smith, at Sturbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • James Cobb Barlow and Sarah M. Stone were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 2 Jul 1860 at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    James C. Barlow, 27, wheelwright, b. ME
    Sarah, 30, b. CT
    George W., 2, b. MA
    Clara J., 1, b. MA
    Wm. H., 28, machinist, b. ME
    Sarah, 26, b. NY
    George, 1, b. MA.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, James gave his occupation as wheelwright.
  • In 1862 James was living at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James Cobb Barlow and George L. Avery, and Charles E. Stone, brothers-in-law who both married daughters of Simon and Sally (Smith) Stone, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co. C.

  • On 11 Aug 1862 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 29 years, 3 months and 15 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 James was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, on the hip.
  • Thomas Blasland wrote a letter on 29 Dec 1862, mentioning James Cobb Barlow, as follows: for publication in the Southbridge Journal. (Click icon to read.)
  • On 18 Apr 1863 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability from wounds received in action.

  • On 28 Aug 1863 James Cobb Barlow was mentioned in an article in the Southbridge Journal. (Click icon to read.)
  • The following appears in the Stone Family Genealogy, by RC Stone, 1866:

    Simon Stone (Charles' father, and father-in-law to James C. Barlow and George L. Avery, all of the 15th) married Sally Smith, and resides in Southbridge, Mass. He is a farmer, as also are his sons; his son-in-law, Charles Biggs is connected with an iron foundry; his sons-in-law, James Barlow and Otis Barlow, are wheelwrights; another son-in-law, George L. Avery, is overseer of a weaving-shop, and all reside in Southbridge, and in that portion of Worcester County.

    The family of Simon Stone is peculiar. We know of no family who deserves its country's gratitude like this. It is a large family and it has largely contributed to the overthrow of treason, and the suppression of rebellion.

    Charles E. Stone, enlisted, served a year(15th MVI), was wounded at Antietam, and discharged.
    William J. Stone, served two years (25th Mass.) and was mortally wounded at Cold Harbor. He died at Armory Square Hospital. Washington, D. C.

    George N. Stone served two years (4th Mass. Cav.) and came home without a scratch.

    Charles Biggs (son-in-law, husband of Lucy Stone; 4th R.I. Inf.) enlisted, served two years, was sick of a chronic dysentery, and was discharged.

    Henry C. Biggs (grandson, and son of Lucy Stone and Charles Biggs; 4th R.I. Inf. with his father) died of sickness in the army hospital.

    James Barlow, (15th MVI, son-in-law) enlisted for three months and again for three years was wounded at Antietam, in the hip, and was discharged.

    Otis Barlow (son-in-law, and brother of James Barlow) served in the army two years (1st CT H.A. and 2nd CT Vols.), and came home safe.

    George L. Avery, (15th MVI, son-in-law) entered the army, and was shot through the foot and discharged; after it healed he enlisted again, and stayed two years.

  • James' brother, Otis, was married to James' sister-in-law, Rhoda Stone. Otis served in Co M, 1st Regiment, Connecticut Heavy Arty and Co C, 2nd Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, and received Pension no. 339833.
  • He's family was enumerated separately in the household of Simon Stone and Sally Smith in the 1870 US Federal Census on 4 Aug 1870 at Sturbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, his two eldest children with their maternal grandparents, as:

    Simon Stone, 70, farmer, b. RI
    Sally, 71, b. MA
    John Putney, 47, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    Eliza E., 42
    George Barlow, 12
    Clara, 10.
  • On 27 Dec 1876 James and Sarah's daughter, Clara Jeannette Barlow married Marcellus L. Sawin at Ft. Collins, Colorado, See: Progressive men of the state of Wyoming, by A. W. Bowen (off-site link at Internet Archive, archive.org.)
  • James Cobb Barlow made application for a veteran's pension in 1879.
  • He and Sarah M. Stone were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Livermore, Larimer County, Colorado, as:
    Barlow, James C., 47, farmer, b. ME
    ---, Sarah M., 50, wife, b. CT
    ---, George W., 22, son, works on farm, b. MA, cannot read
    ---, Frank O., 6, son, b. Colorado
    ---, Fanny E., 4, daur, b. Colorado.
  • James Cobb Barlow and Sarah M. Stone were enumerated in the State census in 1885 at Larimer County, Colorado.
  • On 26 Sep 1894 James and Sarah's daughter, Fannie Ella Barlow married Ernest Judson Brooks at Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colorado.
  • James Cobb Barlow and Sarah M. Stone were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1900 at Sheridan Precinct, Sheridan County, Wyoming, as:
    Barlow, james C., b. Apr 1833, married 44 years, b. ME (of MA parents)
    ---, Sarah M., wife, b. Apr 1830, b. CT
    Brooks, Fannie E., daur, b. June 1875, married five years, both children living, b. Colorado
    ---, Christel M., g-daur, b. Feb 1896, b. Colorado (father b. Neb, mor b. Col)
    ---, Frances A., g-daur, b. Dec 1897, b. Wyoming, (father b. Neb, mor b. Col.)
  • James's wife, Sarah M. Stone, died and was buried in Oct 1902 at Evergreen Cemetery, Juneau, Juneau County, Alaska, at age 72 years and 6 months.
  • In 1907 James Cobb Barlow married Mary Vanderlour.
  • James Cobb Barlow and Mary Vanderlour were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 19 Jan 1910 at Sitka, Sitka County, Alaska, as:
    Barlow, James C., appears to be wheel maker, but smeared
    ---, Mary V., wife, a teacher, b. 1844 in Russia.
  • In 1914 James Cobb Barlow was included on the Civil War memorial at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 15 May 1919 at Buffalo, Johnson County, Wyoming. He was 86 years and 18 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1919 at Willow Grove Cemetery, Buffalo, Johnson County, Wyoming, Plot: Blk 46 Lot 4.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Mary Barlow in the 1920 US Federal Census on 9 Jan 1920 at Soldier's and Sailor's Home, Buffalo, Johnson County, Wyoming, where his widow lives as an inmate, noting that she emmigrated from Russia in 1862 and was naturalized in 1872.
  • On 3 Mar 1921 Mary Vanderlour received a pension to surviving family member in Wyoming based on James's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 899060.
  • Mary, his wife, outlived James and died in 1923.
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2016

Family 1: Sarah M. Stone b. Apr 1830, d. 5 Oct 1902

  • George Warren Barlow b. 17 Nov 1856, d. 11 Apr 1944
  • Clara Jeannette Barlow b. 8 Aug 1858, d. 12 Mar 1919
  • Frank Otis Barlow b. Nov 1873, d. 1897
  • Fannie Ella Barlow b. 22 Jun 1875, d. 17 Nov 1912

Family 2: Mary Vanderlour b. Jan 1844, d. 1923

Charles E. Barnard

b. 10 August 1843, d. 18 May 1887
  • Father: George W. Barnard b. 27 May 1812, d. 17 Nov 1909
  • Mother: Sarah Louisa Stone b. between 1821 - 1822, d. 1885
  • Company: E
  • Charles E. Barnard was born on 10 Aug 1843 at Auburn, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of George W. Barnard and Sarah Louisa Stone.
  • Charles E. Barnard was enumerated in the household of George W. Barnard and Sarah Louisa Stone in the 1850 US Federal Census on 10 Aug 1850 at Auburn, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    George W. Barnard, 38, teamster, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Sarah, 28
    **Charles E., 7
    Francis M., 3.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Auburn, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Charles gave his occupation as farmer.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Auburn, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 17 years, 11 months and 2 days old.
  • On 24 Nov 1862 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • Starting 18 Feb 1864, Charles also served in the 57th Massachusetts Infantry, Company F as 1st Sergeant.
  • He ended his service by mustering out on 12 Jun 1865.
  • On 12 Jun 1865 Charles was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 4 Mar 1869 Charles E. Barnard, 25, married Alice Elvira Woodard, 18, daughter of Joseph L. Woodard and Julia Ann Rockwood, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 20 Feb 1870 his infant daughter, Flora F. Barnard, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of lung congestion.
  • Charles E. Barnard made application for a veteran's pension on 20 Jun 1870, and received certificate number 111537.
  • In 1879 Charles was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles E. Barnard was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Alice Elvira Woodard were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 5 Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Barnard, Alice E., 29, wife, keeping house, b. MA (as were all in the family)
    Barnard, Charles E., 37, crippled soldier
    ---, Cora A., 8, dau
    ---, Julia E., 4, dau
    ---, Inez L., 1, dau
    (Note: Alice is enumerated first.)
  • Charles E. Barnard died on 18 May 1887 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of gunshot wounds received in battle. He was 43 years, 9 months and 8 days old.
  • An obituary for Charles E. Barnard was published on 19 May 1887 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Death of Lieut. Charles E. Barnard
    Lieut. Charles E. Barnard of Worcester, who died on Wednesday, was a member both of the 15th and 57th regiments, enlisting first in 1861 as a private in Co. E, 15th regiment. He was shot through the body at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862, and by reason of the wound was discharged Nov. 24, 1862. In February, 1864 he again enlisted in the 57th regiment, and was appointed 1st sergeant of Co. F of Fitchburg, Capt. Levi Lawrence. He was in all the greatt battles of Grant's wilderness campaign and before Petersburg, and was severely wounded again at the confederate attack and capture of Fort Steadman, March 25th, 1865. On June 12th, 1865, Sergeant Barnard was commissioned second lieutenant and was discharged by reason of expiration of service on July 30th, 1865.
    Lieut. Barnard left the service a cripple for life, and has spent many years a sufferer in bed. When able to leave his couch, he was moved about in a wheel chair, and was also driven about in a carriage. His severe wounds caused a painful complication of afflictions, which he always bore with the utmost fortitude. The cords of his right leg were so contracted that the leg was drawn up and rested on the abdomen and breast. His left arm was also partially paralyzed, and he suffered with a spinal disease. Lieut. Barnard was a member of the G. A. R., and his interest in the organization was always great. Although a helpless cripple, he never forgot a comrade in distress, and often stinted himself to aid a needy veteran. He received a pension of $72 per month. He leaves a wife and three children. George H. Ward Post, No. 10 of Worcester, cared for him during the last week of his life.
  • He was buried in May 1887 at Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to one report. This needs verification.
  • In Jun 1887 Alice Elvira Woodard received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Charles's service; receiving certificate number 33402x.
  • Alice Elvira Woodard was enumerated as the widow of Charles E. Barnard, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, noting his service with the 57th Massachusetts and that he was shot two times through the body.
  • On 20 Oct 1893 Charles and Alice's daughter, Cora A. Barnard married Winfield S. Amidon at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 16 May 1895 Charles and Alice's daughter, Julia Estelle Barnard married William Eugene Thurston at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Alice, his wife, outlived Charles and died on 18 Feb 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 52.
  • On 26 Nov 1903 Charles and Alice's daughter, Inez B. Barnard married William T. Eldridge at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • George, his father, outlived Charles and died on 17 Nov 1909 at Auburn, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 97.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family: Alice Elvira Woodard b. 27 Jul 1850, d. 18 Feb 1903

  • Flora F. Barnard b. 7 Nov 1869, d. 20 Feb 1870
  • Cora A. Barnard b. 2 Sep 1871, d. 10 Jan 1939
  • Julia Estelle Barnard b. 17 Jun 1876, d. Dec 1968
  • Inez B. Barnard b. 11 Jul 1878, d. 16 Feb 1937

George E. Barnard

b. 22 October 1841, d. 22 June 1864
  • Father: John Barnard b. 1792, d. 9 Nov 1866
  • Mother: Cynthia S. Leonard b. 1795, d. 10 Feb 1869
  • Company: D
  • George E. Barnard was born on 22 Oct 1841 at Waldoboro, Lincoln County, Maine, son of John Barnard and Cynthia S. Leonard.
  • George E. Barnard was enumerated in the household of John Barnard and Cynthia S. Leonard in the 1850 US Federal Census on 20 Aug 1850 at Waldoboro, Lincoln County, Maine, as:
    John Barnard, 57, farmer, b. ME (as were all in the household)
    Cynthia S., 55
    Jane A., 19
    John, Jr., 17
    ???? S., 14 (m)
    **Geo. E., 9
    Mari, 7
    Jeremiah Sidelinger, 38, ship carpenter
    May, 45.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, George gave his occupation as jeweler.
  • In 1861 George was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant. He was 19 years, 8 months and 20 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 George was wounded at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 14 Nov 1862 according to the 1870 roster, he enlisted in the regular Army. This appears to be an error.
  • On 1 Jun 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George E. Barnard was mentioned in Volume 93 # 22, Worcester Spy, June 1, 1864
    We found men who were suffering terrible pain, and the boats were so crowded it was almost suffocating. Many have been neglected, as was readily seen by a glance at their wounds, and numbers tell woeful stories regarding the treatment received. Some had to be moved beds and all, as it was dangerous to transfer them to stretchers. We made it our particular aim to attend personally to the movement of some, and much to their gratification.
    The color bearer of the 15th Sergt. Lafayette Warden, Sergt Henry J. Ball, and private Henry R. Dawson of Co. D, 15th, all badly wounded, were attended by us. sergt. Henry Houghton of Co. D, from Worcester, was badly wounded in three places---right thigh broken, and had to be handled very carefully.
    We learn from the latter that Lieut. Hastings and 1st Sergt Barnard, were all right at last accounts, and spoken of in the highest terms. Sergt McFarland of Co. I was unhurt and called a perfect salamander against bullets.
  • He died on 22 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia, unmarried, killed "while skirmishing" as a Sergeant of Co. D, 15th Massachusetts. He was 22 years and 8 months old.
  • He was buried at Poplar Grove National Cemetery (Petersburg National Battlefield), Petersburg, Virginia, Plot: 2637 (Noted: originally buried at Fort Hell. )
  • Sergt. George E. Barnard was promoted sergeant for conspicuous bravery in battle; he was in every engagement with his company (E of 15th Regt.) ; badly wounded at Ball's Bluff; returned to fight in Gettysburg. He was the last man killed in his regiment.
  • On 15 Jul 1874 George E. Barnard was included on the Civil War memorial at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1880, George was included in Marvin's "History of Worcester in the War of Rebellion."
  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2016

Charles Edward Barnes

b. 4 April 1846, d. 1 March 1863
  • Father: Aaron Barnes b. 10 Jan 1806, d. 9 Sep 1846
  • Mother: Thankful M. [--?--] b. 1804, d. 9 Sep 1846
  • Company: H
  • Charles Edward Barnes was born on 4 Apr 1846 at Warren, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Aaron Barnes and Thankful M. [--?--].
  • On 9 Sep 1846 his mother, Thankful M. [--?--], died at Warren, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Charles Edward Barnes was enumerated in the household of Asa Barnes in the 1860 US Federal Census on 21 Jul 1860 at Warren, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with his uncle, as:
    Asa Barnes, 56, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    Maria, 50
    Elbridge, 17
    Lucy C., 16
    George A., 14
    **Charles E., 12
    (nextdoor to)
    Rufus Barnes, 68, farmer
    Chauncy Bemis, 64
    Deborah Barnes, 70
    Lavinia Barnes, 60.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Charles gave his occupation as farmer.

  • On 24 Jan 1862 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 15 years, 9 months and 20 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1862 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, discharged due to disability.

  • He died on 1 Mar 1863 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, unmarried, of disease. He was 16 years, 10 months and 25 days old.
  • Last Edited: 9 Sep 2016

Francis Andrew Barnes

b. 18 March 1835, d. 29 April 1912
  • Father: Thomas Barnes b. 7 Sep 1791, d. 23 Sep 1851
  • Mother: Susannah Buxton b. 16 Feb 1808, d. 4 Mar 1871
  • Company: F
  • Francis Andrew Barnes was born on 18 Mar 1835 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Thomas Barnes and Susannah Buxton.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes was enumerated in the household of Thomas Barnes and Susannah Buxton in the 1850 US Federal Census on 10 Sep 1850 at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Thomas Barnes, 58, carpenter, b. MA (as were all)
    Susanna, 41
    Horace, 18, shoemaker
    Francis, 16, shoemaker
    Jonah H., 12
    Mary A.,      3
    Emory Barton, 35.
  • On 23 Sep 1851 his father, Thomas Barnes, died at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 60.
  • On 6 Jul 1855 Francis Andrew Barnes, 20, married Hannah Bond, 15, daughter of Jacob Bond Jr. and Tamison Powers, at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1862 Francis was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, Francis gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes and James Henry Bond, and Calvin Bond and Stephen P. Bond, brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes and Sumner Hiram Banister, first-cousins, grandsons of Andrew and Susanna (Chase) Buxton, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 3 Feb 1862 Francis mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 26 years, 10 months and 16 days old.
  • On 3 Jul 1863 Francis was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Francis ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • In Jul 1864 Francis was living at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Francis also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company E.
  • He ended his service by discharge on 2 Feb 1865.
  • He and Hannah Bond were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 21 Jul 1870 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Barnes, Frank, 28, works in shoe shop, b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Hannah, 26, keeping house
    ---, Leila C., 14
    ---, Frank, 11
    ---, Nettie, 5
    ---, William, 2
    ---, Hannah, 1.
  • On 23 Oct 1876 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Francis Andrew Barnes was reported present at the 10th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts in an article in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • On 4 Jun 1877 Francis and Hannah's daughter, Leila C. Barnes married Emory C. Fitts at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes and Hannah Bond were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 3 Jun 1880 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Barnes, Francis, 42, fitting shoe ??, b. MA (as were all)
    ---, Hannah, 39, wife
    ---, Francis A., 20, son, teamster
    ---, Nettie E., 15, daur
    ---, William A., 13, son
    ---, Hannah, 11, daur
    ---, George, 4, son
    ---, Herman, 7, son
    ---, Jacob, 5, son
    ---, Charles, 3, son.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 8 Oct 1881, received certificate number 417414.
  • On 7 Jun 1884 Francis and Hannah's daughter, Nettie E. Barnes married Charles N. Schofield at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • In 1886 Francis was living at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, mentioning only his service in the 20th Massachusetts, Co E, from 1 Feb 1862 to 3 Jan 1865.
  • He and Hannah Bond were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1900 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a farmer, and their son Horace lives with them. Of their nine children, eight are still living.
  • On 6 Apr 1905 Hannah Bond, his wife, died at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 65.
  • Francis Andrew Barnes was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census in 1910 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a farmer and widower. A servant, Mary S. Douty, a widow, age 72 from Nova Scotia, Canada, lives with him.
  • He died on 29 Apr 1912 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 77 years, 1 month and 11 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1912 at Westridge Cemetery, Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2016

Family: Hannah Bond b. 22 Sep 1839, d. 6 Apr 1905

  • Leila C. Barnes b. 6 May 1856, d. 3 Mar 1905
  • Francis Andrew Barnes b. 14 Aug 1859, d. 13 Dec 1943
  • Nettie E. Barnes b. 25 Dec 1864, d. 8 Feb 1897
  • William A. Barnes b. 24 Sep 1867, d. 26 Apr 1931
  • Hannah "Annie" Barnes b. 29 Jun 1869
  • George Avery Barnes b. 29 Apr 1871, d. 1962
  • Herman Barnes b. 3 Feb 1873
  • Horace Jacob Barnes b. Nov 1875
  • Charles E. Barnes b. 1877, d. 1957

Richard Joseph Barrett

b. between 1832 and 1833, d. 13 April 1893
  • Father: John Barrett
  • Mother: Catherine [--?--]
  • Company: G
  • Richard Joseph Barrett was born between 1832 - 1833 at England, son of John Barrett and Catherine [--?--], or Ireland.
  • He was married at the time of his enlistment according to Ford's history. However, I have not been able to find him in the 1860 census.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Richard gave his occupation as mechanic.

  • On 5 Dec 1861 Richard mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Jul 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Richard Joseph Barrett was included on a list of sick and wounded on board the Knickerbocker, arrived at Old Point from James River, July 6, bound to New York and Philadelphia.
  • On 11 Jul 1862 Richard ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Georgetown, DC, discharged due to disability.

  • On 15 Mar 1868 Richard Joseph Barrett married Lydia Potter Denise, daughter of Anne [--?--], at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Richard Joseph Barrett and Lydia Potter Denise were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 23 Jun 1870 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Barrett, Richard, 43, constable, b. Ireland
    Lydia P., 31, b RI
    Joseph D., 6/12, b. RI (in Sep 1869)
    Dennis, Anne, 64, b. RI (mor-in-law.)
  • On 23 Jul 1870 his son, Joseph Denise Barrett, died.
  • On 26 Jul 1875 Lydia Potter Denise, his wife, died.
  • Richard Joseph Barrett married Susan A. Wiley.
  • Richard Joseph Barrett and Susan A. Wiley were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 5 Jun 1880 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Barrett, Richard J., 47, works in engine shop, b. England
    ---, Susan A., 29, wife, b. NH
    ---, Annie E., 7, dau, b. RI
    Wiley, Etta M., 32, sister-in-law, single, b. NH.
  • Richard Joseph Barrett was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company G, noting that he now suffereing from a hernia.
  • He died on 13 Apr 1893 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • He was buried in Apr 1893 at Grace Church Cemetery, Elmwood Ave., Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, with his wife, Lydia, and son Joseph, and two other children who appear to have died very young.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Susan A. Wiley in the 1900 US Federal Census on 9 Jun 1900 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Barrett, Susan, head, 41, widow with no children of her own, b. NH
    ---, Annie E., step-dau, 27, single, jeweler, b. RI
    Nentort(?), Jennie, sister, 49, widow, b. NH.
  • Susan A. Wiley, his wife, survived Richard Joseph Barrett and died on 4 Oct 1917 at age 66.
  • Last Edited: 20 Apr 2016

Family 1: Lydia Potter Denise b. 1839, d. 26 Jul 1875

  • Joseph Denise Barrett b. 12 Oct 1869, d. 23 Jul 1870
  • Annie E. Barrett b. Dec 1872

Family 2: Susan A. Wiley b. May 1851, d. 4 Oct 1917

Joseph Barry

b. 1839, d. 28 September 1895
  • Father: John Barry b. 1802
  • Mother: Julia B. Well b. 1815
  • Company: G
  • Joseph Barry was born in 1839 at Vermont, son of John Barry and Julia B. Well.
  • Note: the family attributed to Joseph Barry here is somewhat tentative. There are unclarified discrepancies in his later life.
  • Joseph Barry was enumerated in the household of Julia B. Well and John Barry in the 1860 US Federal Census on 26 Jul 1860 at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    John Barrey, 57, day laborer, b. Canada
    Julia, 45, b. Canada
    **Joseph, 20, factory operator, b. VT
    Tonlin (Lewis), 16, (m), b. Canada
    Julia, 13, b. Canada
    Alexander, 3, b. MA.
  • On 16 Sep 1860 Joseph Berry married Eliza Juniors, daughter of Stephen J. Juniors and Miss [--?--] Gale, at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Joseph gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 9 Dec 1861 Joseph mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years old.
  • In May 1864 Joseph was wounded on the arm.
  • On 18 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph Barry was noted among the wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph Barry was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Joseph ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 27 Jul 1864, Joseph also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company E.
  • He ended his service by discharge on 4 Dec 1864.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 20 Dec 1864, and received certificate number 63xxx.
  • He and Eliza Juniors were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 22 Jun 1870 at Milton, Chittenden County, Vermont, as:
    Barry, Joseph, 32, works in mill, b. VT
    ---, Eliza, 31, b. Canada
    ---, Joseph, 9, b. MA.
  • Joseph Barry and Eliza Juniors were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 8 Jun 1880 at Southbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Berry, Joseph, 42, watchman, b. VT
    ---, Eliza, 42, wife, b. Canada
    ---, Joseph Jr., 19, b. MA
    ---, Albert, 9, son, b. VT
    ---, Gilbert, 9, son, b. VT
    ---, Henry, 3, son, b. MA.
  • Joseph Barry was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Paxton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company G.
  • He died on 28 Sep 1895 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and it was reported in the Worcester Daily Spy:
    "Death of a Veteran - Joseph Barry, a member of Company G of the old 15th regiment, M. V. M., died at 57 Mechanic street Saturday, aged 56 years. He was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, in the left breast, the ball entering the lung and never being found. The wound resulted in consumption, and Mr. Barry has been confined to his bed for several months."
    . He was 56 years old.
  • He was buried on 30 Sep 1895 at Hope Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sec. 44/45. from the Worcester Daily Spy:
    "Veteran's Funeral - The funeral of Joseph Barry, a veteran of the 15th regiment, M. V. M., took place Monday, from the rooms of Sessions & Sons, on Trumbull street. Rev. C. E. Simmons, of Post 10, G. A. R., conducted the services. Comrade Barry was severely wounded in the side at Cold Spring Harbor fight and had been a great sufferer ever since. The ball that entered his body at that time he carried to the grave."
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2016

Family: Eliza Juniors b. 1837

  • Joseph Barry b. 1861
  • Albert Barry b. 1871
  • Gilbert Barry b. 1871
  • Henry Barry b. 1877

Nelson Bartholomew

b. 29 December 1835, d. 21 November 1861

Nelson Bartholomew
  • Father: Adolphus Bartholomew b. between 1794 - 1795
  • Mother: Lydia C. Nye b. between 1806 - 1807, d. 17 Aug 1873
  • Company: E
  • Nelson Bartholomew was born on 29 Dec 1835 at Hardwick, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Adolphus Bartholomew and Lydia C. Nye.
  • Nelson Bartholomew was enumerated in the household of Adolphus Bartholomew and Lydia C. Nye in the 1850 US Federal Census on 10 Sep 1850 at Hardwick, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Adolphus Bartholomew, 55, m, farmer, $4000, CT
    Lydia C., 43, f, b. MA
    **Nelson, 15, m, farmer, b. MA.
  • Nelson was educated and graduated at Yale College, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, in 1856.
  • Nelson was educated and graduated at Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in 1858.
  • In 1858 Nelson Bartholomew was a lawyer and had opened a law office.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Nelson gave his occupation as lawyer.
  • He was comissioned as a 1st Lieutenant with the 15th MVI on 1 Aug 1861 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Nelson Bartholomew was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • On 26 Aug 1861 Nelson Bartholomew was ill at Camp Kalorama, Washington, District of Columbia, with with malarial fever and was never on active duty after that date, although he remained a member of the regiment until his death.
  • Andrew Jackson Bartholomew wrote a letter, about his brother, on 20 Sep 1861 from Poolesville, Maryland, mentioning Nelson Bartholomew, as follows: published in the Southbridge Journal (Vol. 1, #32), in which he states that his brother, Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew, Co. E. Oxford, who has been very low with typhoid fever, is gradually improving, and as soon as he is able to be removed will obtain a furlough and return to Massachusetts where he will remain until sufficiently restored to health and strength to resume his duties. He was to start with his brother in a few days, unless there was a change for the worse. The many friends of Lieut. Bartholomew will be happy to learn that he is recovering.
  • Andrew Jackson Bartholomew wrote a letter, which was published in the Southbridge Journal , on 2 Oct 1861 from Poolesville, Maryland, mentioning Nelson Bartholomew, as follows.
  • Andrew Jackson Bartholomew wrote a letter, which was published in the Southbridge Journal , on 12 Oct 1861 from Poolesville, Maryland, mentioning Nelson Bartholomew, as follows.
  • He died on 21 Nov 1861 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was 25 years, 10 months and 23 days old.
  • On 23 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, his death was reported:
    DEATH OF LIEUT. NELSON BARTHOLOMEW
    Philadelphia, Thursday, Nov. 21, 1861.
    Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew, of the fifteenth Massachusetts regiment died this morning at the La Pierre house, of typhoid fever, contracted while he was in camp. His remains will be sent home tomorrow.
    The above brief but sad announcement flashed over the wires on Thanksgiving evening. The simple notice has been read by many thousands in the different loyal states, and perhaps awakened here and there a passing sympathy of tribute and regard. In this day, when the rude tocsin of war is wildly sounding, and so many hearts, which, but a little while since, beat right thankfully and joyously, are now hushed in the silent repose of death, each community, each state is engrossed in reciting the sad funeral requiem over their own stricken sons.
    But in Worcester county, to the family homestead, to many a cheerful fireside, to many loving and true friends, the news of the young lieutenant’s decease carried sincere grief. It is not my purpose to present an accurate or succinct biography. I wish to twine my homely garland around the name of a schoolmate, a true friend, a brave soldier, an honest man. I knew Nelson Bartholomew well, and if manly virtues form a fitting subject for glowing eulogium, then, indeed, the youthful lawyer-soldier deserves the highest panegyric.
    Nelson Bartholomew was a graduate of Yale college, and also of the Dane Law School in Cambridge. Choosing law for his profession, he was admitted to the bar in this county, and commenced practice in the neighboring town of Oxford. In his legal business he was correct, methodical and laborious. For a young man he had read much law, and, what is better, perused it slowly and reflectingly. He was not brilliant, impulsive or rapid.
    He would never, with long experience, have made a technical, ingenious, subtle pleader. He had a capacious mind, guided by sound common sense. And add to this culture, industry, and experience, and you have the formula for the noblest class of lawyers. Let me note, as a matter of fact, that Bartholomew gained the love and confidence of the Oxford people, and soon commanded a lucrative business.
    Who does not remember, who can ever forget Fort Sumter and Major Anderson! The booming of the rebel cannon then and there sounded the alarm bell, which stirred the blood of every patriotic vein. That artillery storm has been worth to the cause of liberty, five hundred thousand men. The writer well remembers in conversation soon after the capitulation of Sumter, how stern and decided was the language of the young lawyer in regard to that suicidal right, secession.
    We can all talk against treason, but my friend soon resolved to buckle on the armor of battle and fight it down. It is not my province to speak of his efforts in the organization of the Oxford company. I will say, however, with all deference to its worthy captain, that Lieut. Bartholomew was the life and soul of the company in its formation. The Hon. Alexander DeWitt and other citizens of Oxford can bear emphatic testimony to the zeal, devotion, and labor of their fellow townsmen, in rallying the men under the banner of Capt. Watson.
    Prompted by motives of the purest patriotism, Nelson Bartholomew entered his country’s service and bent all his energies to the work in excelling in the school of a soldier. He was a true type of New England soldier. He could never be swerved one hair’s breadth from the line of duty. Such men make unfaltering sentinels of the republic’s honor and safety.
    But the young officer, the genial companion, the devoted friend, has gone to his long home. True, the soldiers death was denied him. He did not, like the heroic Grout, receive his death wound from the whistling ball of the enemy. But he has sacrificed his life in another term for the honor of the starry flag.
    Young men of Worcester County; the names of Grout and Bartholomew deserve your homage, love and remembrance. they are bright stars in our local history. C. M. R.
  • On 29 Nov 1861 his death was also reported in the Southbridge Journal.
    A Brave Patriot Gone
    Many brave and true hearts have been stricken with sorrow at the announcement of the death of Lt. Nelson Bartholomew, of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, which occurred in Philadelphia on Thursday Nov.29, aged 27. He was a native of Hardwick Mass. and graduated from Yale College in 1856, and was afterwards at Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar in this county, and commenced practicing in Oxford, “In his legal business he was correct, methodical and laborious. He had a capacious mind, guided by sound common sense;” and soon gaining the confidence and affection of the Oxford people commanded a lucrative business.
    He was a worthy instance of the degree of greatness in moral worth, learning, and unsullied patriotism which characterizes a large portion of our army. Though possessed with those virtues that make society a blessing, and bring happiness and enjoyment to their possessor, and engaged in a profession which called forth his whole energies and interest in doing a noble work for those of his time; yet when his country cried out for help, he knew nothing higher, or more worthy of his life, than a privilege to sacrifice all for her good.
    It was not his lot to die on the battlefield. But while his brave companions in arms were engaged on that memorable day at Edwards Ferry, he was none the less a hero. His sympathies were with them, and now, after suffering long with a disease contracted soon after entering his country’s service, he has gone to meet those brave hearts that fell on that day.
  • On 30 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, his death was reported: (Volume III #38)
    Death of an Officer
    Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew, of the 15th Massachusetts regiment, died at La Pierre House in Philadelphia, on the morning of our Thanksgiving day, the 21st inst. His disease was typhoid fever, of which he had been sick for some time at Poolesville. An effort was made by his brother to remove him from the camp to his home in Oxford in this country, but he was to unwell to be brought farther than Philadelphia. Young Bartholomew was a native of this county, of either Hardwick or New Braintree; a graduate of Yale college, and also of the Dane Law School at Cambridge. He had commenced his professional life at Oxford, with good prospects of success. He was of a genial nature, and he met his acquaintance always with a pleasant smile. But his death adds another to a long line of young men, whom this wicked rebellion has taken in the prime of life to enroll among the martyrs for liberty…. Palladium.
  • He was buried in 1861 at Hardwick Cemetery, Hardwick, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 11 Dec 1861 Nelson was the subject of a letter to the Worcester Weekly Spy from his commanding officer:
    THE LATE LIEUT. BARTHOLOMEW
    Capt. Charles H. Watson, of Co. E., fifteenth regiment, writes to us, enclosing the following order issued to the regiment immediately after the death of Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew of his command:-
    Headquarters Fifteenth Regiment, Mass. Vols.
    Camp Foster, Poolesville, Nov. 27, 1861.
    Regimental Orders- In respectful memory of the high character and civil and military virtue of the late Lieut. Nelson Bartholomew, the commissioned officers of the regiment, and the non-commissioned officers and privates of Co. E, to which he was attached, will wear crape on the left arm for thirty days from the date of this order.
    By order of Col. Devens.
    RICHARD DERBY, Acting Adjt.
    Capt. Watson writes further, that his death has caused many a sad heart in Co. E, of which he was an active member, honored, loved, and respected, as a scholar, soldier, and officer. He was one of the first to respond to his country's call, and the honor of the early organization of the DeWitt Guards, to which his time, talent, and money, were freely devoted, was due to him.

    The captain, for himself and his company, tender their thanks to the kind and patriotic ladies and citizens of Oxford, who have remembered them in their absence, and acknowledges, with especial gratitude, the receipt of well filled boxes with a token of their respects.
  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Nelson Bartholomew was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • About 1890 Nelson Bartholomew was included on the Civil War memorial at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • B. Ducharme writes the following:
    Nelson Bartolomew was born in Hardwick on Dec.29,1835. He was graduated from Yale college in 1856. He then entered Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar in 1858, and opened an office in Oxford. When the war broke out he determined to enlist, and his patriotism was so great that he persisted, although he was warned that he would be likely to break down under the strain. A local paper says: "Lieutenant Bartolomew was the life and soul of company E in it’s formation.....He was the true type of New England soldier."
    He was taken sick August 26, ( I believe that this was on the regiment’s first march, a distance of about 35 miles from Camp Kalorama in Washington toward Poolsville MD ) with malarial fever, and was never on active duty after that date, although he remained a member of the regiment until his death. Early in November he started for home in charge of his brother, but was unable to go further than Philadelphia, where he died November 21.
  • Last Edited: 2 Apr 2016