Josiah Stone

b. 17 November 1830, d. 23 May 1907
  • Father: Josiah Stone b. 22 May 1771, d. 28 Apr 1852
  • Mother: Sophia Jacobs b. 1798, d. after 1870
  • Company: D
  • Josiah Stone was born on 17 Nov 1830 at Saco, York County, Maine, son of Josiah Stone and Sophia Jacobs, his mother being a descendant of George Jacobs of Salem Witchcraft fame.
  • Josiah Stone was enumerated in the household of Josiah Stone and Sophia Jacobs in the 1850 US Federal Census on 5 Sep 1850 at Saco, York County, Maine, as:
    Jacob Stone, 78, $800 property, b. ME (as were all in the family)
    Sophia, 53
    **Josiah Jr., 19, farmer
    Sophia, 22,
    Lucinda, 15
    Horatio, 11.
  • On 28 Apr 1852 his father, Josiah Stone, died at age 80.
  • On 2 Sep 1860 Josiah Stone, 29, married Abigail Pike, 28, daughter of Daniel Pike and Jane [--?--], at Saco, York County, Maine.
  • Starting 16 Jul 1861, Josiah also served in the Co. I, 13 Massachusetts Infantry.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 Josiah was transferred to the Western Gunboat Service, where he served on the U. S. S. Benton and Carondelet.
  • He ended his service with the U. S. S. Clara Dolsen by discharge on 8 Aug 1863.
  • Starting 8 Dec 1863, Josiah also served in the Co. I, 2nd Regiment Massachusetts Heavy Artillery.
  • He ended his service with a discharge by Special Order #1320 (signifigance unknown) on 28 Dec 1863.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Josiah gave his occupation as carpenter.

  • On 31 Mar 1864 Josiah mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry having received a bounty of $325, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 33 years, 4 months and 14 days old.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Josiah ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 25 Aug 1864 Josiah was taken prisoner at Reams' Station, Dinwiddie County, Virginia.
  • On 26 Nov 1864, Josiah was exchanged from prisoner status.
  • He and Abigail Pike were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 23 Jul 1870 at Monson, Piscataquis County, Maine, as:
    Stone, Josiah, 39, farmer, b. ME (as were all in family)
    ---, Abba, 37
    ---, Marcia E, 8
    ---, Mary A., 7
    ---, Orin L., 5
    ---, Sophia, 72 (his mother.)
  • Josiah and Abigail's daughter, Marcia E. Stone married William R. Henry.
  • Josiah Stone and Abigail Pike were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 13 Jun 1900 at Norway, Oxford County, Maine, as:
    Stone, Josiah, head, b. Nov 1830, 69, married 39 years, b. ME (as were all in family), farm laborer
    ---, Abby, wife, b, Nov 1831, 68, all three of her children are living
    ---, Mary A., dau, b. Apr 1863, stitcher in shoe factory.
  • Josiah Stone died on 23 May 1907 at Norway, Oxford County, Maine. He was 76 years, 6 months and 6 days old.
  • He was buried in May 1907 at Riverside Cemetery, South Paris, Oxford County, Maine.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Abigail Pike b. 5 Nov 1831, d. 26 Aug 1907

  • Marcia E. Stone b. 1861, d. 1917
  • Mary A. Stone b. Apr 1863, d. 1940
  • Rev. Orin L. Stone b. Apr 1865, d. 1931

Luman Webster Stone

b. 3 April 1841, d. 28 July 1934
  • Father: John C. Stone b. 1817, d. 6 Apr 1887
  • Mother: Clarissa Dodge b. 1818, d. 1 Aug 1888
  • Company: B
  • Luman Webster Stone was born on 3 Apr 1841 at Massena, Saint Lawrence County, New York, son of John C. Stone and Clarissa Dodge.
  • Luman Webster Stone was enumerated in the household of Earl Stone and Lydia Wilcox in the 1850 US Federal Census on 3 Sep 1850 at Massena, Saint Lawrence County, New York, as:
    Earl Stone, 63, farmer, b. VT
    Lydia, 49
    John C., 32, farmer, b. NY (as were all the children)
    Clarissa, 32
    Martha M., 17
    **Luman H., 9
    Matilda, 6
    Aldula, 1
    Orville, 22.
  • In 1861 Luman was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Luman gave his occupation as mechanic.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Luman mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years, 3 months and 9 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Luman was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luman Webster Stone was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • Walter Abbott Eames wrote a letter to Sarah Ann Ames, his wife, on 15 Nov 1861, mentioning Luman Webster Stone, as follows.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luman W. Stone was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luman Webster Stone was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Luman Webster Stone was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 12 Mar 1862 Luman ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Yorktown, York County, Virginia, due to disability.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 9 Feb 1863, and received certificate number 221898.
  • Starting Jan 1864, Luman also served in the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry, Company "F."
  • On 28 Feb 1864 Luman was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 1 Mar 1864 Luman was promoted to Sergeant.
  • On 26 Jul 1865 Luman was promoted to 1st Sergeant.
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 4 Nov 1865.
  • Luman Webster Stone married Isabella Hosford, daughter of Uriel Hosford and Martha Kinsman, the widow of Charles Hall.
  • Isabella Hosford m. 1st Charles Hall 26 Aug 1862 ; her child from this marriage is Charles H. Hall, b. 8 June 1863.
  • On 27 Aug 1877 his son, Earl Frederick Stone, died at Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming, at age 4.
  • Luman Webster Stone and Isabella Hosford were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Anita, Cass County, Iowa, as:
    STONE, Luman W., 39, farmer
    ---, Isabella, 38, wife
    HALL, Charles H., 17, step-son, farm laborer b. VT, as were his parents
    GARDNER, Alace, 17, servant.
  • In Jun 1886 Luman was living at Anita, Cass County, Iowa.
  • On 28 Jun 1888 Luman Webster Stone wrote a letter read at the reunion of Company B, The Fusiliers.
  • On 28 Jun 1892 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luman Webster Stone wrote a letter read at the 24th annual reunion of the Company B, 15th Massachusetts, association -- the Fitchburg Fusiliers. (Click the icon to read the report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • He and Isabella Hosford were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1900 at Anita, Grant Township, Cass County, Iowa, where they live alone, having been married 29 years, and his occupation is given as "landlord."
  • On 29 Jun 1901 Luman Webster Stone wrote a letter to be read at the 40th reunion of Company B.
  • In Jun 1909 Luman was living at Reed's Spring, Missouri.
  • On 26 Jun 1909 Luman Webster Stone wrote a letter read at the 41st reunion of Company B, The Fusiliers.
  • He and Isabella Hosford were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 25 Apr 1910 at Ruth Township, Stone County, Missouri, as:
    STONE, Luman W., head, 69, married 40 years, b. NY, "own income"
    ---, Isabella H., wife, 68, one of her two children is living.
  • On 23 Nov 1914 Isabella Hosford, his wife, died at Massena, Saint Lawrence County, New York, at age 72.
  • Luman was living at Reed's Spring, Missouri.
  • On 9 Dec 1915 Luman Webster Stone, 74, married Mary Ella Whitmore, 49, daughter of Alfred A. Whitmore and Martha P. Fletcher, at Polk County, Iowa, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • Note: for unclear reasons, he gives his grandparents, Earl and Lydia (Wilcox) Stone, as his parents in this 1915 marriage record. This same info is repeated on his death certificate.
  • Luman Webster Stone and Mary Ella Whitmore were enumerated in the 1930 U. S. Federal Census in 1930 at Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, as:
    Luman W Stone, 88
    Mary E Stone, 63.
  • Luman Webster Stone died on 28 Jul 1934 at Springfield, Greene County, Missouri. He was 93 years, 3 months and 25 days old.
  • He was buried in Jul 1934 at Massena Central Cemetery, Massena, Cass County, Iowa, Block A, Lot 88, with his wife, where he is noted as a Civil War Vet.
  • Mary, his widow, outlived Luman and died on 26 Sep 1940 at Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, at age 74.
  • Last Edited: 26 Mar 2017

Family 1: Isabella Hosford b. 20 May 1842, d. 23 Nov 1914

  • Earl Frederick Stone b. 8 Jul 1873, d. 27 Aug 1877

Family 2: Mary Ella Whitmore b. 11 Apr 1866, d. 26 Sep 1940

Luther Stone

b. 25 January 1832, d. 2 December 1898
  • Father: Asa Stone b. about 1800, d. before 1850
  • Mother: Olive Cudworth b. between 1802 - 1803
  • Company: E
  • Luther Stone was born on 25 Jan 1832 at Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Asa Stone and Olive Cudworth.
  • Before 1850 his father, Asa Stone, died.
  • On 1 Jul 1852 Luther Stone, 20, married Cyrene Trask, 38, daughter of Salem Larned and Huldah Harwood, at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her.
  • Luther Stone and Cyrene Learned were enumerated in the State census in 1855 at Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Luther Stone, 24, shoemaker
    Cyrena L Stone, 42
    Charles C Trask, 19.
  • Luther Stone and Cyrene Learned were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 15 Jul 1860 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Luther Stone, 30, shoemaker, b. MA
    Cyrena, 46, b. MA
    Olive Lomond (?), 57, b. MA (his widowed and remarried mother?)
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Luther gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 31 Jul 1862 Luther mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 30 years, 6 months and 6 days old.
  • Starting 31 Jul 1862, Charles C. Trask, his step-son, served in the in Company G, of the 34th Massachusetts Infantry, and mustered out on 5 March 1864.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Luther was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 15 Jan 1863 Luther ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luther Stone was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 15 Sep 1863, and received certificate number 22089.
  • Starting 18 Aug 1864, Luther also served in the Company H, 13th Regiment V. R. C.
  • He ended his service with the V. R. C. on 13 Nov 1865.
  • On 5 Apr 1867 Cyrene Learned, his wife, died at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 53.
  • Luther Stone married Ann [--?--].
  • Luther Stone and Ann [--?--] were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 24 Jun 1870 at Derby, Orleans County, Vermont, as:
    Stone, Luther, 38, farm labor, b. MA
    ---, Ann, 38, b. NH
    living on the farm of James Morrill, 60, b. VT.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Luther Stone was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Ann [--?--] were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 3 Jun 1880 at Derby, Orleans County, Vermont, as:
    Stone, Luther, 48, farm laborer, b. MA (of MA parents)
    ---, Ann, 48, wife, b. NH
    ---, Emma, 8, daur, b. NH.
  • Luther Stone was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Beebe Plain, Derby, Orleans County, Vermont, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company E, noting that he was wounded.
  • He died on 2 Dec 1898 at Derby, Orleans County, Vermont, a suicide. He was 66 years, 10 months and 7 days old.
  • Last Edited: 2 May 2016

Family 1: Cyrene Learned b. 13 Jul 1813, d. 5 Apr 1867

Family 2: Ann [--?--] b. 1832

  • Emma Stone b. 1872

William Brandt Storer

b. 2 April 1838, d. 14 October 1884

William B. Storer
  • Father: Robert Boyd Storer b. 2 Apr 1795, d. 14 Dec 1870
  • Mother: Sarah Sherman Hoar b. 9 Nov 1817, d. 23 Jul 1907
  • Company: Staff
  • William Brandt Storer was born on 2 Apr 1838 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of Robert Boyd Storer and Sarah Sherman Hoar, and a great-grandson of founding father, Roger Sherman.
  • Note: His father, Robert Boyd Storer, was a wealthy merchant who specialized in goods from Russia. He lived for a time in Arkangelsk, Russia, and became closely acquainted with a prominent mercantile family based in that city, the Brandts. Robert Storer served as the Russian Consul in Boston for many years. His son William later took over that post when his father died.
  • William Brandt Storer was enumerated in the household of Robert Boyd Storer and Sarah Sherman Hoar in the 1860 US Federal Census on 13 Jun 1860 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, as:
    Robert B. Storer, 63, merchant, b. ME
    Sarah, 42, b. MA (as were all the children)
    ** William B., 22, merchant
    Sarah F., 20
    Elizabeth H., 18
    Margaret, 14
    Bridget S., 50, b. ME
    Bridget Crowley, 25, servant, b. Ireland
    Mary McCormick, 25, servant, b. Ireland.
  • George William Baldwin and Jeremiah Evarts Greene, William Brandt Storer, second cousins, and descendants of founding father, Roger Sherman, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as officers.
  • In 1862 William was living at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 28 Jan 1862 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as 1st Lieutenant, being credited to the quota of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 9 months and 26 days old.
  • On 2 Jan 1863 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by resignation.

  • On 6 Apr 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Brandt Storer was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • On 10 Apr 1863 at "The Southbridge Journal", Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Brandt Storer was mentioned in an article listing commissions and officer promotions in the regiment, as well as which discharged or deceased officers they replaced.
  • On 1 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Brandt Storer was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • He was graduated in 1866 at Harvard College, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 1 Mar 1866 William Brandt Storer, 27, married Emily Frances Williams, 25, daughter of Samuel King Williams and Elizabeth W. Whitman, at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • William Brandt Storer died on 14 Oct 1884 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He was 46 years, 6 months and 12 days old.
  • An obituary for William Brandt Storer was published on 15 Oct 1884 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    "William Brandt Storer died very suddenly at his home in Cambridge, Tuesday morning, probably of disease of the heart. He was the head of the firm of Robert B. Storer & Co. of Boston, which has done an extensive business in the foreign trade, largely with Russia, for many years. He was also vice consul for Russia at the port of Boston. He was for a time quartermaster of the fifteenth Massachusetts regiment during the late war, and was afterwards a member of Gen. Devens' staff. He was a nephew of Senator Hoar."
  • An obituary for William Brandt Storer was published on 15 Oct 1884 at "Boston Daily Advertiser" as follows:
    William Brandt Storer
    The death of William Brandt Storer, which occurred yesterday morning from heart diasese, at his residence in Cambridge, was a great shock to his friends in this city, where he was widely known and esteemed.
    Though he had had premonitions of the result, few but his most intimate friends were aware of the malady, which was masked by his robust appearance and his hearty geniality.
    It was hard to associate sickness or death with his cheery and abounding vitality. His frank, engaging manner was a the garb of a genuine sincerety and kindliness of heart.
    A striking characteristic was his unobtrusive benevolence. Many are the kindly and charitable deeds which are known only to the objects of his bounty.
    Mr. Storer was the son of the late Robert B. Storer, a prominent merchant of Boston, who for a long time was engaged in the Russia trade, and he was a nephew of Judge E. Rockwood Hoar, his mother being the latter's sister.
    A graduate of Harvard of the class of 1859.....
    Mr. Storer retained a warm interest in his alma mater and besides serving as chief marshal on Commencement Day was ever ready to aid in promoting the welfare of the university.
    On the breaking out of the Civil War he entered the army and served on the staff of General Devens with the rank of colonel. Here as elsewhere he exhibited the devotion to dity and the manly and generous traits which were so characteristic of him.
    He afterward went into business with his father, whom he succeeded as Russian vice-consul.
    During the administration of Governor ??? Mr. Storer was a member of his council.
    He was at the time of his death Russian vice-councul, a director in the National Bank of Commerce, treasurer of the Sailors' Snug Harbor, director of the Reform School at Thompson's Island and vice-president of the Union Club. In these various positions of honor and trust he was ever the manly, courteous gentleman, faithful in the performance of duty and winning the regard of all who were associated with him.
    Only a few months ago he performed the last sad office of respect and affection for his friend and classmate, George Baty Blake, by taking charge of his funeral. Mr. Storer leaves a widow and several children.
  • He was buried in Oct 1884 at Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Plot: Heliotrope Path, Lot 973.
  • On 17 Oct 1884 at "The Boston Journal", Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, it was noted:
    "The funeral of Mr. William Brandt Storer, Russian Vice Consul at Boston, takes place today. The flags of the various Consulates at this port are at half mast."
  • In 1884 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, an administration (No. 17805) of his estate was held.
  • Robert, his only son, outlived William and died on 18 Aug 1885 at age 18.
  • William's wife, Emily Frances Williams, died and was buried in Jul 1897 at Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Plot: Heliotrope Path, Lot 973 at age 57 years and 2 months.
  • William's mother, Sarah Sherman Hoar, died and was buried in Jul 1907 at Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 89 years and 7 months.
  • The following according to the MOLLUS Directory 1912 -
    1st Lieutenant, R.Q.M., 15th Mass.
    Infantry, January 28, 1862.
    Resigned January 2, 1863.
    Commissioned Captain, Assistant
    Adjutant General, U.S.V., June 7, 1864; declined.
  • William Brandt Storer's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Elizabeth Winslow Storer and Helen Langdon Storer in the 1930 US Federal Census in 1930 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Elizabeth Storer, 59
    Helen L., 58
    Catherine Gannon,      45
    Mary A Hughes, 55
    Dalia Abbott, 60.
  • Last Edited: 2 May 2016

Family: Emily Frances Williams b. 23 Apr 1840, d. 21 Jul 1897

  • Robert Boyd Storer b. 20 Nov 1866, d. 18 Aug 1885
  • Elizabeth Winslow Storer b. 25 Nov 1870, d. 31 Aug 1961
  • Helen Langdon Storer b. 12 Mar 1872, d. 25 Apr 1954

Jonathan P. Stow

b. 26 July 1832, d. 1 October 1862

Jonathan P. Stowe
  • Father: Jonathan Warren Stowe b. 25 Nov 1809, d. 13 Mar 1866
  • Mother: Mary Hunt b. 9 Mar 1809, d. 5 Mar 1868
  • Company: G
  • Jonathan P. Stow was also known as Jonathan P. Stowe in some military records.
  • He was born on 26 Jul 1832 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Jonathan Warren Stowe and Mary Hunt.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Jonathan gave his occupation as farmer.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Jonathan mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant, being credited to the quota of Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 28 years, 11 months and 16 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Jonathan was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jonathan P. Stow was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jonathan P. Stow was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Sergt. Jonathan P. Stow was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Jonathan P. Stow was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Jonathan was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, and lost a leg. Click HERE to read his diary entries for the following days.
  • He died on 1 Oct 1862 at Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, unmarried, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam. He was 30 years, 2 months and 5 days old.
  • He was buried in Oct 1862 at Old Oak Street Burial Ground, Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where his parents would soon join him.
  • Jonathan Warren Stowe, his father, survived Jonathan and died on 13 Mar 1866 at age 56.
  • Mary Hunt, his mother, survived Jonathan and died on 5 Mar 1868 at age 58.
  • The personal papers or letters of Jonathan P. Stow are available at at Virginia Tech Library, Virginia, a diary located in the "the Eldon "Josh" Billings Diary Collection, which is found in the Virginia Tech library. " -- as quoted in " The Civil War Years"; A day by day chronicle of the life of a nation, by Robert E. Denney; published by Sterling Publishing Co. of New York.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Sergt. Jonathan P. Stow was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • In Aug 1972 Civil War Times Illustrated Magazine (Volume XI Number 5) published an article "Life With The 15th Mass. by Sergeant Jonathan P. Stowe."
  • Last Edited: 18 Aug 2016

James Stringer

b. between 1832 and 1833, d. 21 October 1861
  • Mother: Ann M. [--?--] b. 1810
  • Company: K
  • James Stringer was born between 1832 - 1833 at England, son of Ann M. [--?--].
  • In 1861 James was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, James gave his occupation as soldier.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, killed in action.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Stringer was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • In Aug 1889 Ann M. [--?--] received a pension to surviving family member in England based on James's service; his mother, who still lived in England, received certificate number 275599.
  • Last Edited: 2 Dec 2014

Martin V. Strong

b. 1836, d. 17 September 1862
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Martin V. Strong was born about in 1836.
  • In 1861 Martin was living at Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Starting 16 Apr 1861, Martin also served in the 6th Infantry Regiment Massachusetts, Company H.
  • He ended his service with the 6th Infantry Regiment on 2 Aug 1861 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Martin gave his occupation as Machinist.

  • On 2 Sep 1861 Martin V. Strong mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 25 years old.
  • He died on 17 Sep 1862 at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland. He was 26 years old.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Martin V. Strong was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, on the 35th anniversary of the battle. (Articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Last Edited: 20 Aug 2016

John Moore Studley

b. 8 January 1829, d. 10 April 1903

John M. Studley
  • Father: Zenas Studley b. 3 Jan 1797, d. 3 May 1862
  • Mother: Almira Stowell b. between 1800 - 1801, d. 20 Nov 1871
  • Company: D
  • John Moore Studley was born on 8 Jan 1829 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Zenas Studley and Almira Stowell.
  • On 2 May 1850 John Moore Studley, 21, married Julia Ann Gill, daughter of George Gill and Maria Fisk, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • John Moore Studley was enumerated in the household of Oscar M. Downes and Anna M. Gill in the 1850 US Federal Census on 31 Aug 1850 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    **Oscar Downes, 27, m, cabinet maker $425, b. CT
    Anna M., 19, b. VT
    **John M. Studley, 21, m, b. MA, stair builder, (noted that he married within the year)
    Julia “, 18, f, b. VT, (noted that she married within the year)
    (Note: Anna and Julia were sisters.)
  • John Moore Studley and Julia Ann Gill were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1860 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    John M. STUDLEY, 30. stair builder, b. MA (as were all)
    Julia, 28
    Frances, 9
    John E., 7.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, John gave his occupation as stair-builder.
  • John Moore Studley and Oscar M. Downes, brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co. D.

  • On 6 Aug 1861 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Captain
    , being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 32 years, 6 months and 29 days old.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 John was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • In Oct 1861 John Moore Studley was mentioned in a report to the Richmond Dispatch about the arrival of federal prisoners in that city.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was mentioned in dispatches or (not necessarily correctly) among the casualties of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • He wrote a letter on 4 Dec 1861 as follows: published in the Worcester Spy --
    THE PRISONERS AT RICHMOND.-- The following letter, from Capt. Studley, has been furnished for publication:-
    Richmond Prison, Dec. 4, 1861.
    Dear-: Yours of Nov. 21st was received yesterday, and I assure you a letter here is quite a luxury for those of us who have not heard from home for six weeks. I am well as usual. A few of men have been sick, and one (Corporal Lamb, of Co. A) has died. Corporal C. M. Smith, of my company, is in the hospital, theatened with fever. The weather is quite cold. We manged to get up a Thanksgiving dinner, the 21st. We could not get a turkey cooked, so we had oysters, and two kinds of pudding. The Massachusetts men dined togeather that day. We have plenty of meat and bread furnished us, but everything else (except rice occasionally) we have to buy. We do not mind that, while our money last. Butter is 60 and 70 cents a pound; coffe $1, tea $2.75; everything else in the same porportion. A large box of clothing was received yesterday for the men of the twentieth Massachusetts, also blankets and clothing for Co. B of the fifteenth regiment. The officers of the fifteenth wrote to Mayor Davis, soon after we arrived here, that the men would want some clothing to make them comfortable, hoping measures would be taken to furnished them. Have you heard anything about us. I think arrangements have been made here to have clothing and money forward to us. The captain at this post thinks money had better be sent by mail. Direct all packages to the care of General J. H. Winder, Richmond, Va., via Old Point Comfort, and they will be forwarded.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, John Moore Studley was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 27 Feb 1862 John was noted as having returned home. From the "Worcester Daily Spy," 27 Feb 1862 (Volume 17 #50):
    City And County
    Capt. Studley Welcomed Home
    Capt. John M. Studley, of company D, fifteenth regiment, with two privates in the Fitchburg company, who have been prisoners at Richmond since the battle of Ball’s Bluff, arrived in town by the express train from New York yesterday afternoon. A large crowd collected at the depot, awaited their arrival, and a committee consisting of the mayor and the military committee of the city government, and others conducted Capt. Studley to his residence. The other liberated prisoners are at Washington, and as soon as they receive their pay, will come home, perhaps within two or three days. they are allowed thirty days furlough, by the secretary of war. Capt. Simmonds, of the Fitchburg company reached home on Tuesday.
  • On 19 Mar 1862 John was reported as the guest of honor at a town ball: from the "Worcester Daily Spy," 18 and 19 March 1862 (Volume 17 #66 and #67),
    The Complimentary Levee To Captain Studley
    The social levee and ball, in honor of Captain J. M. Studley, will be held in Mechanics’ Hall this evening. The arrangements for the festivities have been made in a liberal manner, so that the many friends of the gallant captain will hardly fail to pass a pleasant evening, besides uniting in the testimonial to his worth and services.
    An interesting feature of the occasion will be the presentation of a sword and belt to Capt. Studley. Persons wishing to contribute articles for the table are requested to send them to the hall during he forenoon. The music is to be furnished by Gilmore’s Band, of Boston, and this will be delightful news to the lovers of dancing. Subscribers are notified that they can procure their tickets on application at the Mechanics Bank or at the door. Tickets will also be supplied at the door, at a reduced rate, admitting spectators to the galleries.

    City And County
    The Levee At Mechanics Hall
    The ball complimentary to Capt. J. M. Studley of the fifteenth regiment, came off in Mechanics Hall last evening, and was highly successful. The space in the rear of the speaker’s platform was very tastefully decorated with the stars and stripes, and bore the inscription. “Captain John M. Studley, fifteenth regiment.” A sword, the gift of members of the Worcester Light Infantry and other friends, was presented to Captain Studley by W. A. Williams, Esq., who made pertinent allusion to the time, when in the ranks of the infantry, Capt. Studley learned his first lessons in military drill.
    Mr. Williams proceeded to speak of the manner in which Captain Studley fulfilled his duties as a member of the old Infantry organization, when he was suddenly seized with a fainting fit, and but for the timely assistance of several gentlemen near him, would have fallen to the floor. Mr. Williams recovered, but not sufficiently to warrant his making any further remarks.
    In response, Capt. Studley returned thanks to his friends for this expression or their esteem and generosity. He feared that his services were overestimated, but he was cheered by the reflection that he had ever endeavored to do his whole duty. While he has always cheerfully obeyed the orders of his superiors he had made it a rule to look after and watch over the men entrusted to his care and command.
    In conclusion, the captain said he was but a poor speech maker, and friends who knew him best expected but little from his oratory. He promised to use the weapon faithfully, and said that no stain of dishonor should ever rest on the blade.
    The dancing was kept up to a late hour, and everyone seemed well pleased with the evening’s entertainment.
  • Thomas Blasland wrote a letter on 23 Apr 1862, mentioning John Moore Studley, as follows: for publication in the Southbridge Journal.
  • On 3 May 1862 his father, Zenas Studley, died at age 65.
  • In May 1862 John witnessed the burial of Zenas Studley, his father, at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 65 years and 3 months.
  • On 27 Oct 1862 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts to become Lieut. Colonel of the 51st Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 31 Oct 1862, John also served in the 51st Infantry, M.V.M as Lieutenant Colonel.
  • On 9 Feb 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • He ended his service on 30 Jun 1863.
  • He attended the funeral of Elisha G. Buss on 24 Jul 1863 at Woodlawn Cemetery, Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1864 John was living at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, where he worked for a merchant and relative, Theodore Studley.
  • On 21 Oct 1864 at The Bay State House, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley wrote a letter read at the First Annual Reunion of the Fifteenth Regiment Association.
  • He immigrated in 1866 to Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where he was employed as a clerk.
  • On 4 Feb 1874 John and Julia's daughter, Julia Frances Studley married James Bacon Gay.
  • John Moore Studley and Julia Ann Gill were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 7 Jun 1880 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Studley, John M., 51, rubber dealer, b. MA
    ---, Julia A., 47, wife, b. VT
    Downey, Margaret, 23, servant, single, b. Ireland
    Gay, James B., 33, son-in-law, bookkeeper, b. RI
    ---, Julia F., 29, daur, b. MA
    Wells, Helen H., 41, sister-in-law, married, b. MA
    Gay, Addie S., 9/12, b. Aug, granddaur, b. RI.
  • On 21 Oct 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley attended the 14th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment.
  • On 20 Oct 1883 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley attended the 17th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 110 other veterans of the regiment. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 21 Oct 1884 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley attended the 18th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • In 1886 John was living at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • In Jun 1886 John Moore Studley took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • On 21 Oct 1888 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley attended the annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel., Monday, 22 October 1888)
    Fifteenth Regiment Reunion
    The annual reunion of the veterans of the 15th Mass. regiment was held at Worcester, Saturday, and was greatly enjoyed by all who attended. The veterans, about 125 in number, formed by companies and were photographed on the common, near the soldiers' monument. Dinner was served at the Bay State House. Judge Devens presided, and made an eloquent speech, in which he referred to the 15th regiment as losing more men, in proportion to its members, than any other Mass. regiment.
    Col. J. M. Studley followed with some interesting memories of war times, and nearly every company was represented among the speakers.
    Sergt. Henry A. Spooner, for Co. B, told an amusing story of the strictmess of discipline in the regiment, and asked for a speech from A. A. Simonds of Dayton, Ohio.
    Mr. Simonds spoke of the hard service that the regiment went through in the Wilderness campaign. He said that on visiting the field of Waterloo he was impressed with the openness of the field, which allowed for evolution which the field of Gettysburg made impossible. He closed by expressing his pleasure at being able to attend the reunion.
    Among the other speakers were:
    Dr. C. A. Wheeler,
    Capt. T. J. Hastings,
    J. E. Greene,
    D. M. EArle and others.
    Charles May, with his fiddle, and several members of the old regimental band, furnished popular music for the occasion.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company D, noting that he was in prison after Ball's Bluff until 26 February 1862.
  • On 21 Oct 1902 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley attended 36th annual reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Regiment Association.
  • He died on 10 Apr 1903 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. He was 74 years, 3 months and 2 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1903 at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where his wife and son, John, would later join him.
  • On 20 Apr 1903 Julia Ann Gill received a pension to surviving family member in Rhode Island based on John's service; and received certificate number 664744.
  • On 19 Oct 1903 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Moore Studley was noted as deceased in the previous year in a newspaper article about the 38th regimental reunion. From the Fitchburg Sentinel, 19 Oct 1903:
    Reunion of the 15th Regiment
    Wednesday will mark the gathering at Worcester of the survivors of that grand old fighting regiment, the 15th Massachusetts, who will meet in reunion in Worcester, to commemorate the 42d anniversary of the battle of Ball's Bluff, their first baptism of blood, shot, and shell.
    For 37 years the regimental association has had its annual reunion in Worcester on the date commemorating the fight at Ball's Bluff. All the original field officers have joined the great bivouac on the other side except Gen. John W. Kimball of Fitchburg, who went out as the first major and won a glorious record for bravery and ability.
    The reunion Wednesday will include the business meeting at the board of trade rooms, Worcester, at 10.30 o'clock, followed by the annual dinner at Grand Army hall at 12 o'clock, which is furnished by the Women's relief corps. A rousing reunion is expected.
    Death has depleted the ranks of many prominent members since the last reunion, including three former captains, Capt. C. H. Eager; Capt. J. M. Studley, Capt. J. Evarts Green; William J. Woodbury, who constructed the granite shaft of the Antietam monument, Wilder S. Holbrook and Joseph Pecot.
  • Julia Ann Gill, his wife, survived John and died on 26 Feb 1910.
  • In 1912 He is entered in the MOLLUS records as follows:
    STUDLEY, JOHN MOORE.
    LIEUTENANT COLONEL, 51st INFANTRY, MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEER MILITIA, IN SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES.
    Elected January 1, 1890. Insignia 7569.
    Captain, 15th Mass. Infantry, July 12, 1861; mustered, August 1, 1861. Discharged to accept promotion, October 27, 1862.
    Lieutenant Colonel, 51st Infantry, M.V.M., October 31, 1862; mustered, November 11, 1862. Mustered out, July 27, 1863.
    Died at Providence, R. I., April 10, 1903.
  • The personal papers or letters of John Moore Studley are available at at American Antiquarian Society, 185 Salisbury Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609-1634, consisting of a diary.
  • A photograph or image of John Moore Studley is located at American Antiquarian Society, 185 Salisbury Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609-1634, as Colonel of the 51st Massachusetts.
  • Credits: Primary photo above by permission of the Worcester Historical Museum, Ward Collection.
  • Last Edited: 26 Oct 2016

Family: Julia Ann Gill b. 1832, d. 26 Feb 1910

  • Julia Frances Studley b. 14 Nov 1850, d. 6 Mar 1948
  • John Edward Studley b. 1852, d. 31 Dec 1924

Daniel Green Sturtevant

b. 30 March 1822, d. 11 July 1896
  • Father: Heman Sturtevant b. 21 Jan 1792, d. 22 Feb 1862
  • Mother: Sarah Green b. 1 Jul 1800, d. 1 Mar 1881
  • Company: 1_SS
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant was born on 30 Mar 1822 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, son of Heman Sturtevant and Sarah Green.
  • On 9 May 1844 Daniel Green Sturtevant, 22, married Laura G. Young, 16, daughter of Robert Young and Elizabeth J. Gerry, at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant and Laura G. Young were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 3 Sep 1850 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    D. G. Sturtevant, 28, shoemaker, b. MA
    Laura, 22, b. VT
    Adelaide, 6, b. MA
    G. E., 4, m., b. MA.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant and Laura G. Young were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 3 Aug 1860 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Daniel G. Sturtevant, 38, cordwainer, b. MA
    Laura G., 32, b. VT
    Adelaide M., 15, b. MA
    George E., 13, b. MA
    Laura G., 4, b. MA
    Kesiah Gerry, 62, seamstress, b. VT.
  • At the time of his enlistment, Daniel gave his occupation as Shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Daniel was living at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

  • On 3 Sep 1861 Daniel G. Sturtevant mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 39 years, 5 months and 4 days old.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant and Leonard Samuel Whittier, uncle and nephew, served together in the 1st Company, Andrew Sharpshooters.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 his father, Heman Sturtevant, died at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, of consumptiion at age 70.
  • On 31 Jan 1863 Daniel ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by discharge due to disability.

  • On 12 May 1864 his nephew, Leonard Samuel Whittier, died at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, at age 22 killed in battle.
  • Starting 25 Jul 1864, Daniel also served in the 13th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps, Company A.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Daniel's daughter, Adelaide Mandana Smith married Orin Augustine Dodge at South Reading, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her. (Note: she was the widow of one William B. Smith who died 1862 serving with a Massachusetts Artillery unit.)
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant and Orin Augustine Dodge, father-in-law and son-in-law, both veterans of the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters, served together in the 13th V. R. C.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant ended his service with the 13th Regiment U.S. Veteran Reserve Corps, Company A by mustering out on 17 Nov 1865.
  • On 23 Jul 1867 his married daughter, Adelaide Mandana Sturtevant, died at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 22 in child birth.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant and Laura G. Young were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 6 Jul 1870 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Sturtevant, Daniel, 48, works in shoe factory, b. MA
    ---, Laura G., 42, b. VT
    ---, Laura G., 15, works in shoe factory, b. MA
    Fay, George, 4
    Brown, John C., 19, works in shoe factory, b. MA
    in same duplex:
    Sturtevant, G. E., 22, works in shoe factory, b. MA
    ---, Myra J., 21, works in shoe factory, b. MA
    ---, Addie M., 2.
  • On 28 Feb 1872 Daniel and Laura's daughter, Laura Geneva Sturtevant married Frederick Lewis Jr. at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Daniel Green Sturtevant made application for a veteran's pension on 18 May 1879, and received certificate number 206219.
  • He was enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 11 Jun 1880 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Sturtevant, Daniel G., 58, shoemaker, b. MA
    ---, Laura, 52, wife, b. VT
    Lewis, Eva, 24, daur, married, b. MA
    ---, Anna H., 6, g-daur, b. MA
    Sturtevant, Sally, 78, mother, widow, b. MA
    his brother nextdoor:
    Sturtevant, Heman, 60, shoemaker, b. MA
    ---, Mary, 56, wife, b. MA.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 1st Co. Andrews Sharpshooters.
  • He died on 11 Jul 1896 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, of an accidental fall. He was 74 years, 3 months and 11 days old.
  • He was buried in Jul 1896 at Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Jul 1896 Laura G. Sturtevant received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Daniel's service; his wife, received certificate number 434090.
  • He left a will at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Laura, his wife, outlived Daniel and died on 6 Jan 1908 at Stoneham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 79.
  • Last Edited: 26 Apr 2016

Family: Laura G. Young b. 19 Apr 1828, d. 6 Jan 1908

  • Adelaide Mandana Sturtevant b. 15 Oct 1844, d. 23 Jul 1867
  • George Elliot Sturtevant b. 6 Sep 1846, d. 11 Apr 1911
  • Laura Geneva Sturtevant b. 24 Jun 1855, d. 28 Jun 1912

James Sullivan

b. February 1840, d. 7 August 1903
  • Company: K
  • James Sullivan was born in Feb 1840 at Rhode Island.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, James gave his occupation as spinner.
  • In 1861 James was living at Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Uxbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years and 5 months old.
  • On 8 Aug 1862, at "The Public Ledger", Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, James Sullivan and Samuel D. Brigham were mentioned among the sick and wounded brought by transport steamer from Harrison's Landing.
  • On 18 Aug 1862 James ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, due to disability.

  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Sullivan was mentioned among the casualties.
  • Between 1869 - 1870 James Sullivan married Margaret [--?--] possibly in Rhode Island, according to the 1900 census.
  • James Sullivan made application at New York for a veteran's pension on 7 Aug 1889, and received certificate number 574621.
  • James Sullivan was telegrapher.
  • On 22 Sep 1893, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion, Grant County, Indiana, James was admitted.
  • James named his next-of-kin to the soldiers' home as: Margaret Sullivan, wife, 225 W. 15th Street, NYC.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 25 Jun 1900 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion, Grant County, Indiana, as:
    Sullivan, James, b. Feb 1840, married 30 years, b. RI (of Irish parents), works in the laundry.
  • He died on 7 Aug 1903 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion, Grant County, Indiana. He was 63 years and 6 months old.
  • He was buried in Aug 1903 at Marion National Cemetery, Marion, Grant County, Indiana, Plot: 1 G-1125.
  • On 17 Sep 1903 his personal effects were sent to Mrs. Margaret Sullivan, (widow) Stamford, Connecticut.
  • On 7 Dec 1906 Margaret Sullivan received a pension to surviving family member in New York based on James's service; his wife, received certificate number 622330.
  • There are several open issues here.
    Certain is that James Sullivan of Co. K, 15th Mass, received a service pension in New York, as did his wife, Margaret, after his death.
    Given some two dozen James Sullivans, with wife Margaret, in the 1880 census, it becomes very vague thereafter.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Margaret [--?--]

Jeremiah Sullivan

b. between 1834 and 1835, d. 19 December 1863
  • Company: I
  • Jeremiah Sullivan was born between 1834 - 1835 at unknown.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Jeremiah gave his occupation as painter.
  • He was married at the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts according to Ford's history.
  • Jeremiah was living at Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts.

  • On 5 Aug 1863 Jeremiah mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a draftee, being credited to the quota of South Danvers, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 19 Dec 1863 at Douglas Hospital, Washington, DC, of disease.
  • He was buried in Dec 1863 at US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery (Military Asylum Cemetery), Washington, DC.
  • Ford lists this man among the "unassigned" men, however the MASSCW concludes that he was indeed in Company I.
  • Last Edited: 13 Apr 2016

Jeremiah J. Sullivan

b. between 1839 and 1840, d. 16 January 1915
  • Father: Eugene O'Sullivan
  • Mother: Mary Downing
  • Company: K
  • Jeremiah J. Sullivan was born between 1839 - 1840 at Ireland, son of Eugene O'Sullivan and Mary Downing.
  • On 20 Sep 1860 Jeremiah O'Sullivan married Mary Williams, daughter of James Williams and Catharine Shea, at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Jeremiah gave his occupation as bootmaker.
  • Jeremiah J. Sullivan and George Williams, brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • In 1864 Jeremiah was living at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 17 Mar 1864 Jeremiah mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry having received a bounty of $325, being credited to the quota of Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 15 May 1864 Jeremiah was wounded.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Jeremiah ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 12 Jul 1864, Jeremiah also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company K.
  • He ended his service on 16 Jul 1865 at Washington, DC.
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 25 Jul 1866, and received certificate number 77892.
  • He and Mary Williams were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 13 Jul 1870 at Mendon P. O., Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Sullivan, Jeremiah J., 32, in boot factory, b. Ireland
    ---, Mary, 30, b. Ireland
    ---, Julia, 8
    ---, Mary, 7
    ---, Catherine, 5
    ---, Elizabeth, 3
    ---, James E., 10/12.
  • Jeremiah J. Sullivan and Mary Williams were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1880 at Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts, as:
    Sullivan, Jeremiah J., 38, machinist, b. Ireland
    ---, Mary, 37, wife, b. Ireland
    ---, Julia A., 18, dau, works in cotton mill, b. MA
    ---, Catherine, 15, dau, works in cotton mill, b. MA
    ---, Elizabeth, 13, dau, b. MA
    ---, James, 11, son, b. MA
    ---, Jeremiah, 7, son, b. MA.
  • On 1 Sep 1892 Jeremiah and Mary's son, James Eugene Sullivan married Bride C. Dineen at Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Jeremiah J. Sullivan died on 16 Jan 1915 at Fall River, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
  • He was buried in Jan 1915 at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 2 Feb 1916 Mary Williams received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Jeremiah's service; his wife, receiving certificate number 807685.
  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2016

Family: Mary Williams b. between 1839 - 1840

  • Julia Sullivan b. 9 Sep 1861
  • Mary Sullivan b. 21 Mar 1863, d. 21 Jan 1874
  • Catherine Sullivan b. 22 Mar 1865
  • Elizabeth Sullivan b. 19 May 1867
  • James Eugene Sullivan b. 7 Jul 1869
  • Jeremiah Sullivan b. 17 Feb 1873

John Sullivan

b. 1841
  • Company: I
  • John Sullivan was born about in 1841 at England.
  • In 1863 John was living at England.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, John gave his occupation as baker.

  • On 30 Jul 1863 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry a private, as a substitute for a drafted man, being credited to the quota of Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was 22 years old.
  • John Sullivan and Patrick Sullivan, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co. I.
  • In 1863 John was promoted to Corporal, at an unknown date.
  • On 22 Jun 1864 John was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Virginia.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 John Sullivan appeared on the muster rolls of the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry asssigned to Company E.
  • On 11 Aug 1864 his brother, Patrick Sullivan, died at Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, of disease, as a prisoner of war.
  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John Sullivan was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • On 25 Nov 1864, John was exchanged from prison.
  • On 7 Jan 1865 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts, Company K.

  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 16 Jul 1865 at Washington, DC.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 8 May 1867, with application 125536, but no certificate is recorded.
  • Last Edited: 21 Feb 2015

John F. Sullivan

b. between 1842 and 1843, d. 28 February 1875
  • Father: Mathew Murtough Sullivan b. 1815
  • Mother: Ann [--?--] b. 1820
  • Company: E
  • John F. Sullivan was born between 1842 - 1843 at Ireland, son of Mathew Murtough Sullivan and Ann [--?--].
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, John gave his occupation as blacksmith.

  • On 30 Jul 1861 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 John was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • On 19 Dec 1862 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Washington, DC, due to disability due to wounds.

  • He attended the funeral of George Hull Ward on 8 Jul 1863 at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • John F. Sullivan made application for a veteran's pension on 28 Dec 1863, and received certificate number 27212.
  • John F. Sullivan married Catherine Dowd, daughter of William Dowd, (Note: her maiden name needs further verification.)
  • John F. Sullivan and Catherine Dowd were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 8 Jun 1870 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, possibly as:
    Sullivan, John, 28, laborer, b. Ireland
    ---, Kate, 30, b. Ireland
    no children.
  • John F. Sullivan was buried in Feb 1875 at Saint Johns Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 28 Feb 1875 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of dropsey.
  • Catherine Sullivan was enumerated as the widow of John F. Sullivan, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and she states that his left arm was shot off, and he had a gunshot in the bowels and hip.
  • On 17 Jul 1890 Catherine Dowd received a pension to surviving family member based on John's service; his wife, received certificate number 846563.
  • Last Edited: 18 Dec 2014

Family: Catherine Dowd b. between 1839 - 1840, d. 3 Mar 1894

Joseph Sullivan

b. between 1840 and 1841
  • Company: A
  • Joseph Sullivan was born between 1840 - 1841 at Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1861 Joseph was living at Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Joseph gave his occupation as farmer.

  • On 2 Aug 1861 Joseph mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Deerfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Joseph was taken prisoner according to Ford's history.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, according to the MASSCW.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph Sullivan was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Joseph Sullivan was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Joseph Sullivan was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 31 Jan 1863 Joseph ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia, by desertion, according to all available sources.

  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2012