Jeremiah Evarts Greene

b. 27 November 1834, d. 8 November 1902
  • Father: Rev. David Greene b. 15 Nov 1797, d. 7 Apr 1866
  • Mother: Mary Evarts b. 2 Dec 1806, d. 25 Oct 1850
  • Company: F
  • Jeremiah Evarts Greene was born on 27 Nov 1834 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, son of Rev. David Greene and Mary Evarts, grandson of Thomas and Anna (Knight) Greene; and on the maternal side of Jeremiah and Mehitable (Sherman) Evarts, making Jeremiah a great-grandson of American founding father, Roger Sherman.
  • Aaron E Baldwin writes:

    George William Baldwin's father, Governor and United States Senator Roger Sherman Baldwin, graduated from Yale College in 1811, and nine years later married Emily (Pitkin) Perkins.
    Emily was the granddaughter of the Connecticut Colony assemblyman and House Speaker, Rev. Timothy Pitkin (Yale 1747), and the great-granddaughter Governor William Pitkin and Yale College's first President Rev. Thomas Clap. She was also a descendant of Connecticut Colony Governors George Wyllys and John Haynes, Massachusetts Bay Colony Governor Thomas Dudley and Plymouth Colony Governor William Bradford.
    Governor Roger Sherman Baldwin's sons were: Roger Sherman Baldwin Jr. (S&B 1847), George William Baldwin (S&B 1853) and Simeon Eben Baldwin (S&B 1861). All followed in the footsteps of their Bonesmen cousin, U.S Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General and U.S. Senator, William Maxwell Evarts (S&B 1837) (also a Sherman grandson.) George's brother, Roger Sherman Baldwin Jr., died age 30 in 1856 at Baker's Ranch, near Michigan Bluff, in California....while looking for gold!.
    Additionally, Jeremiah Evarts Greene, of the 15th Massachusetts, was George's cousin. His mother Mary Evarts, sister of William Maxwell Evarts (see above), was also Roger Sherman Baldwin's first cousin; as her mother Mehitable (Sherman) Evarts was Roger Sherman's daughter (his 14th of 15 children).
    Jeremiah's father, David Greene, was the corresponding secretary of an organization partially founded by his father-in-law, the Rev. Jeremiah Evarts -- the American Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missons (ABCFM).

  • On 25 Oct 1850 his mother, Mary Evarts, died at Westborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 43.
  • Jeremiah Evarts Greene was graduated in 1853 at Yale College, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.
  • "The year following graduation he taught in the Episcopal Academy at Cheshire, Conn., and the next year in Keosauqua, IA., and was then occupied for two years in the survey for the U.S. Government of public lands in Kansas. He returned to Massachusetts in 1859, was admitted to the Worcester County bar less than a year later, and settled in North Brookfield." (from his obituary, see below.)
  • In 1861 Jeremiah was living at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Jeremiah gave his occupation as lawyer.

  • On 1 Aug 1861 J. mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a 1st Lieutenant, being credited to the quota of North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 8 months and 5 days old.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • Jeremiah Evarts Greene and George William Baldwin, and William Brandt Storer, second cousins, and descendants of founding father, Roger Sherman, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as officers.
  • Jeremiah Evarts Greene was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, and was taken prisoner.
  • In Oct 1861 Jeremiah Evarts Greene was mentioned in a report to the Richmond Dispatch about the arrival of federal prisoners in that city.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah was mentioned:
    Lieut. Greene----Dispatches have been received by L. H. Boutelle (sic), Esq. of Westborough, brother- in law of Lieut. Greene of North Brookfield, expressing strong hopes, founded on inquiries made at Poolesville, that he is still living.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, J. Evarts Greene was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • Jeremiah wrote a letter on 4 Dec 1861 from Richmond Prison, Richmond, Richmond City, Virginia, as follows: From the Worcester Daily Spy:
    THE PRISONERS AT RICHMOND.-
    The friends of Lieut. Green of the fifteenth regiment have received a letter from him, dated at Richmond, December 5th, in which he writes, among other things, of the condition and deprivations of his company. What he says of his own men will doubtless apply to all, whose wants the generous and humane people of Worcester county should not have left unsupplied. Blankets and clothing of verious kinds have been sent to some of the prisoners, and have arrived safely; and there is little risk of loss if the goods are properly packed and directed. The letter says:-
    "The twenty four men of my company need such things more than I do, and I hope something has been done already towards supplying them. They, of course, have not much money, and are confined in a large ware room without fire, unless that has been supplied them within a few days. They are furnished with course cotton enough to make a narrow bed for each man, and straw to fill them with, and with a thin cotton comforter each. The weather for a few days has been quite severe, so that the snow, of which there was a slight fall a few days ago, hardly melts in the sun at noon. A splendid supply arrived yesterday for the Fitchburg company, and you have no idea how delighted they were with it."
  • On 17 Jan 1862 Jeremiah was promoted to Captain.
  • On 22 Oct 1862, Jeremiah was returned as a paroled prisoner.
  • On 23 Oct 1862 Jeremiah ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by resignation.

  • On 14 Apr 1864 Jeremiah Evarts Greene, 29, married Mary Anna Bassett, daughter of John G. Bassett and Henrietta Clark Kirtland, at New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.
  • On 7 Apr 1866 his father, Rev. David Greene, died at Westborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 68.
  • J. Evarts Greene and Mary Anna Bassett were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 20 Jun 1870 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Greene, J. Evarts, 35, editor
    ---, Mary A., 35
    Mooney, Mary E., 13, domestic servant
    Powers, Margaret, 25, domestic servant.
  • J. Evarts Greene and Mary Anna Bassett were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    J. Evarts GREEN, 45, b. MA, as a newspaper editor, and wife Mary A. , 45, b. CT, and two servants in the house.
  • On 21 Oct 1882 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene attended the 16th annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • On 20 Oct 1883 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene attended the 17th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 110 other veterans of the regiment. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • In 1886 Jeremiah was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1886 Jeremiah Evarts Greene was included in the Civil War memorial publication at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Jul 1886 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene was reported as having attended the 19th reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • In 1888 J. Evarts Greene was editor of the Worcester "Daily Spy" according to the city directory.
  • On 21 Oct 1888 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene attended the annual regimental reunion of the 15th Massachusetts. (Report from the Fitchburg Sentinel., Monday, 22 October 1888)
    Fifteenth Regiment Reunion
    The annual reunion of the veterans of the 15th Mass. regiment was held at Worcester, Saturday, and was greatly enjoyed by all who attended. The veterans, about 125 in number, formed by companies and were photographed on the common, near the soldiers' monument. Dinner was served at the Bay State House. Judge Devens presided, and made an eloquent speech, in which he referred to the 15th regiment as losing more men, in proportion to its members, than any other Mass. regiment.
    Col. J. M. Studley followed with some interesting memories of war times, and nearly every company was represented among the speakers.
    Sergt. Henry A. Spooner, for Co. B, told an amusing story of the strictmess of discipline in the regiment, and asked for a speech from A. A. Simonds of Dayton, Ohio.
    Mr. Simonds spoke of the hard service that the regiment went through in the Wilderness campaign. He said that on visiting the field of Waterloo he was impressed with the openness of the field, which allowed for evolution which the field of Gettysburg made impossible. He closed by expressing his pleasure at being able to attend the reunion.
    Among the other speakers were:
    Dr. C. A. Wheeler,
    Capt. T. J. Hastings,
    J. E. Greene,
    D. M. EArle and others.
    Charles May, with his fiddle, and several members of the old regimental band, furnished popular music for the occasion.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • In 1892, Jeremiah was on the council of the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester.
  • In 1892 Jeremiah Evarts Greene was the Post Master of Worcester, Massachusetts.
  • He was a pall bearer at the burial of Bernard Barton Vassall on 26 Mar 1894 at North Cemetery, Main Street, Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 Jan 1897 Mary Anna Bassett, his wife, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • J. Evarts Greene was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 11 Jun 1900 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as a widower, age 65, and post master. His nephew Evarts Loomis, b. Dec 1879 in CA, is a student and living with him. There is one servant in the house.
  • He died on 8 Nov 1902 at Plainfield, Union County, New Jersey, while on a visit to his sister. He was 67 years, 11 months and 12 days old.
  • An obituary for Jeremiah Evarts Greene was published as follows:
    Jeremiah Evarts Greene, son of David Greene (Yale 1821), for many years Secretary of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and Mary (Evarts) Greene, and grandson of Jeremiah Evarts (Yale 1802), was born in Boston, Mass., on November 27, 1834. Soon after his birth the family removed to Roxbury, and about 1848 to Westborough, Mass. In 1849 he entered New York University, but a year later joined the Sophomore class at Yale.
    The year following graduation he taught in the Episcopal Academy at Cheshire, Conn., and the next year in Keosauqua, IA., and was then occupied for two years in the survey for the U.S. Government of public lands in Kansas. He returned to Massachusetts in 1859, was admitted to the Worcester County bar less than a year later, and settled in North Brookfield.
    At the outbreak of the Civil War he was the first from the town to enlist, and aided in raising the 15th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, of which he was commissioned First Lieutenant, August 1, 1861. With other officers he was taken prisoner at the battle of Ball's Bluff, Va., October 21, 1861, and held at Richmond until February 2, 1862, when he was released on parole. He was commissioned Captain in the 15th Regiment, June 17, 1862, but resigned on October 23 following. Returning to his law practice, Mr. Greene remained in North Brookfield until May 1, 1868, when he removed to Worcester. He became associated with Hon. John D Baldwin in the editorship of the Worcester Spy, and continued as leading editorial writer of that paper for twenty-three years.
    In 1891 he was appointed Postmaster at Worcester and during his service of over ten years conducted the office entirely without partisanship and with an efficiency which was signally recognized at Washington and throughout the Post Office department. He was twice President of the Board of Directors of the Worcester Free Public Library, and a member of the council of the American Antiquarian Society. His life was one of singular unselfishness.
    Mr. Greene died on November 8, 1902, of softening of the brain, at Plainfield, N. J., while on a visit to his sister, the wife of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy, Esq., (LL.B. Yale 1857). He had nearly completed his 68th year.
    He married, on April 14, 1864, at New Haven, Conn., Mary Anna, daughter of John G. and Henrietta C (Kirtland) Bassett, of New York City, and granddaughter of Rev. Amos Bassett, D.D. (Yale 1784). Mrs. Greene died after many years of suffering in 1897. They had no children.
    One of Mr. Greene's brothers graduated at Williams College in 1852 and was killed in the attack on Arkansas Post in 1863; and two younger brothers graduated at Dartmouth College.
  • He was buried in Nov 1902 at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.
  • On 12 Nov 1902 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, the following appeared:
    Memorial to Mr. Greene Placed at Postoffice:
    A beautiful memorial for the late Postmater J. Evarts Greene was completed in his old office at the post office yeaterday and it will remain in place for 30 days. It is placed over the open fireplace, the space above the mantel being heavily draped in black. In front of this sombre background is a fine portrait of the dead postmaster, flanked on each side by wreaths of ferns and asparagus sprays. The wreaths on the left hand side are tied with a blue ribbon bearing the words "Yale '51," and those on the right being tied with white ribbon bearing in gilt letters the "15th Regiment."
  • He and Mary Anna Bassett had no issue.
  • On 19 Oct 1903 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Jeremiah Evarts Greene was noted as deceased in the previous year in a newspaper article about the 38th regimental reunion. From the Fitchburg Sentinel, 19 Oct 1903:
    Reunion of the 15th Regiment
    Wednesday will mark the gathering at Worcester of the survivors of that grand old fighting regiment, the 15th Massachusetts, who will meet in reunion in Worcester, to commemorate the 42d anniversary of the battle of Ball's Bluff, their first baptism of blood, shot, and shell.
    For 37 years the regimental association has had its annual reunion in Worcester on the date commemorating the fight at Ball's Bluff. All the original field officers have joined the great bivouac on the other side except Gen. John W. Kimball of Fitchburg, who went out as the first major and won a glorious record for bravery and ability.
    The reunion Wednesday will include the business meeting at the board of trade rooms, Worcester, at 10.30 o'clock, followed by the annual dinner at Grand Army hall at 12 o'clock, which is furnished by the Women's relief corps. A rousing reunion is expected.
    Death has depleted the ranks of many prominent members since the last reunion, including three former captains, Capt. C. H. Eager; Capt. J. M. Studley, Capt. J. Evarts Green; William J. Woodbury, who constructed the granite shaft of the Antietam monument, Wilder S. Holbrook and Joseph Pecot.
  • Last Edited: 10 Apr 2016

Family: Mary Anna Bassett b. 1834, d. 14 Jan 1897

Lucius H. Greene

b. August 1833, d. 1908
  • Company: I
  • Lucius H. Greene was born in Aug 1833 at Canterbury, Windham County, Connecticut.
  • Lucius was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Lucius gave his occupation as laborer.

  • On 10 Jul 1861 Lucius mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 27 years and 11 months old.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Lucius H. Greene was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • He was declared missing in action on 2 Jul 1863 at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Lucius H. Greene was reported as missing at Gettysburg.
  • On 16 Dec 1863 Lucius ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Veterans' Reserve Corps.

  • He ended his service with the 2d Battln, 55th Infantry Regiment Reserve Corps on 5 Aug 1864.
  • Starting 21 Sep 1864, Lucius served in the Company I, 3rd Artillery.
  • On 28 Sep 1867, at Fort Constitution, New Hampshire, Lucius was discharged as a Private.
  • Lucius H. Greene married Mary J. [--?--]
  • Lucius H. Greene and Mary J. [--?--] were enumerated in the State census on 1 Jun 1875 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Lucius H Greene, 34, card grinder, b. CT
    Mary H Greene, 24. b. RI
    Maria Williams, 54, boarder.
  • Lucius H. Greene made application at Rhode Island for a veteran's pension in Aug 1879.
  • He and Mary J. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 15 Jun 1880 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Greene, Lucius, 40, farm laborer, b. CT
    ---, Mary J., 30, wife, b. RI
    ---, Lucius, 12, son, b. CT (Note: he is possibly an adopted or foster son, as he does not appear in the 1875 census.)
  • Lucius H. Greene was enumerated in the State census on 1 Jun 1885 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as a card grinder, age 47.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in 1890 at Centerdale, Johnston, Providence County, Rhode Island, as having served in Co. D (sic) of the 15th Massachusetts.
  • Before 1900 his son, Lucius Green, died.
  • Lucius H. Greene and Mary J. [--?--] were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 20 Jun 1900 at Gloucester, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Greene, Lucius H., b. Aug 1833, married 27 years, b. CT, farmer
    ---, Mary J., wife, b.Nov 1851, both of her children deceased, b. RI.
  • Lucius H. Greene died in 1908 at Rhode Island. He was 74 years old.
  • He was buried at Acotes Hill Cemetery, Glocester, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • On 2 Aug 1908 Mary J. [--?--] received a pension to surviving family member in Rhode Island based on Lucius's service; received certificate number 668176.
  • Mary, his wife, outlived Lucius and died in 1910.
  • Last Edited: 5 Jun 2017

Family: Mary J. [--?--] b. Nov 1851, d. 1910

  • Lucius Green b. 1868, d. before 1900
  • George Frederick Nelson Greene b. 14 Jul 1875, d. 28 May 1878

Ezra L. Greenleaf

b. 24 February 1828, d. 24 November 1896
  • Father: Benjamin Greenleaf d. before 1867
  • Mother: Rhoda Clonch
  • Company: I
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf was born on 24 Feb 1828 at Northwood, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, son of Benjamin Greenleaf and Rhoda Clonch, (He appears to have taken ten years off his age at enlistment time.)
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf married Mary A. Elliott.
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf and Mary A. Elliott were enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census on 17 Sep 1850 at Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, as:
    Ezra L. Greenleaf, 22, shoemaker, b. NH
    Mary A. B., 20, b. NH
    Kysandria, 6/12, (m.), b. NH.
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf and Mary A. Elliott were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 22 Jun 1860 at Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, as:
    Ezra Greenleaf, 32, shoemaker, b. NH (as were all in the family)
    Mary, 30
    Sarah, 10
    Francis, 8
    Martha, 5
    Orrin, 3
    George, 1.
  • In 1864 Ezra was living at Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Ezra gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 14 Apr 1864 Ezra mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry having received a bounty of $325, being credited to the quota of Marshfield, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was 36 years, 1 month and 21 days old.
  • On 5 May 1864 Ezra was wounded at The Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, and missing.
  • On 18 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Ezra L. Greenleaf was noted among the wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Ezra ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Ezra also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company "G."
  • He ended his service by mustering out on 16 Jul 1865.
  • Mary A. Elliott, his wife, died apparently.
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf made application for a veteran's pension on 23 Jun 1866, and received certificate number 235974.
  • On 14 Dec 1867 Ezra L. Greenleaf, 39, married Roxana Smith, 45, daughter of Caleb Francis and Rebecca Ball, at Warren, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both. She was widow of Nathan Leander Smith.
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf and Roxana Francis were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1880 at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    reenleaf, Ezra, 52, farmer, b. NH
    ---, Roxana, 58, wife, b. MA.
  • On 5 Nov 1883 Ezra and Mary's son, Orrin E. Greenleaf married Emma Louise Sherman at Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her; they were step-siblings.
  • About in 1884 Ezra and Mary's daughter, Martha A. Greenleaf married Sylvester W. Carr.
  • On 14 Oct 1887 his grandson, Lowell Ezra Greenleaf, son of Orrin E. Greenleaf and Emma Louise Smith, was born at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Ezra L. Greenleaf was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company G, noting dates which coincide with his entrance into the 15th and exit from the 20th. He has had his forefinger shot off.
  • He died on 24 Nov 1896 at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 68 years and 9 months old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1896 at Quabbin Park Cemetery, Ware, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, Lot 49NE, Sec 5, Plot 2, as a member of the 20th Massachusetts.
  • Roxana Francis received a pension to surviving family member based on Ezra's service; his wife, received certificate number 442233.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Orrin E. Greenleaf and Emma Louise Smith in the 1900 US Federal Census on 13 Jun 1900 at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Greenleaf, Orrin, b. Jan 1854, married 17 yearrs, b. NH, engineer
    ---, Emma L., wife, bl June 1858, one child, b. MA
    ---, Lowell E., son, b. Oct 1886, b. MA
    ---, Roxana, mor-in-law, b. Jan 1823, widow/d (divorced?), two of four children living, b. MA.
  • On 13 Oct 1902 Roxana Francis, his wife, died at Dana, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 80.
  • Last Edited: 26 May 2016

Family 1: Mary A. Elliott b. 1830

  • Hysandora Sarah Greenleaf b. 1850
  • Francis Greenleaf b. 19 Mar 1852
  • Orrin E. Greenleaf b. Jan 1854, d. 1945
  • Martha A. Greenleaf b. 20 Nov 1854, d. 20 Sep 1932
  • George E. Greenleaf b. Mar 1859

Family 2: Roxana Francis b. 30 Jan 1822, d. 13 Oct 1902

Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf

b. 2 March 1835, d. 18 April 1902
  • Father: John Chamberlain Greenleaf b. 24 Oct 1805, d. 9 Mar 1885
  • Mother: Julia Whitney b. 30 Jun 1807, d. 10 Feb 1887
  • Company: D
  • Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf was born on 2 Mar 1835 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of John Chamberlain Greenleaf and Julia Whitney.
  • In 1861 Levi was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Levi gave his occupation as clerk.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Levi mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 26 years, 4 months and 10 days old.
  • On 26 Jun 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf was mentioned in an article about the arrival of sick and wounded soldiers from Fortress Monroe.
  • Before 8 Dec 1863, Levi was transferred to the non-comissioned Staff as commissary sergeant.
  • On 15 Mar 1864 Levi ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the V. R. C.

  • He ended his service due to completion of his term of service as a member of Company "K", 6th VRC on 28 Jul 1864.
  • About 1865 Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf moved from Massachusetts to Cook County, Illinois.
  • He was enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 6 Jul 1870 at Union Stock Yards P. O., Lake, Cook County, Illinois, as:
    Gurnlif (sic), Levi C., 36, stock agent of ?? Rail road, b. MA
    in a boarding house.
  • Between 1870 - 1871 Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf married Sarah E. Jones.
  • Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf and Sarah E. Jones were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 14 Jun 1880 at Hyde Park, Cook County, Illinois, as:
    Greenleaf, L. C. 44, cattle dealer, b. MA (of MA parents)
    ---, Sarah, 30, b. Michigan
    ---, William, 8, son, b. Illinois
    ---, Wilter, 9/12, son, b. Illinois.
  • Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf and Sarah E. Jones were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 1 Jun 1900 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, as:
    Greenleaf, L. C., head, b. Mar 1835, married 29 years, b. MA (of MA parents), clerk at stock yard
    ---, Sarah E., wife, b. Jan 1850 in Indiana, four of her six children are living
    ---, William, son, b. Dec 1871
    ---, Charles S., son, b. Jan 1877
    ---, Wallis L., son, b. Sep 1879
    ---, Fannie H., dau, b. June 1884.
  • Levi's wife, Sarah E. Jones, died and was buried on 24 Nov 1901 at Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, at age 52 years, 11 months and 2 days.
  • Levi Chamberlain Greenleaf made application for a veteran's pension on 7 Mar 1902, with application number 1282170, but no certificate is recorded.
  • He died on 18 Apr 1902 at The Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was 67 years, 1 month and 16 days old.
  • He was buried on 19 Apr 1902 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, most likely with his wife.
  • On 10 Jun 1908 Levi and Sarah's daughter, Fannie H. Greenleaf married Charles Edward Burch at La Port County, Indiana.
  • On 9 Sep 1929 Levi's daughter, Fannie H. Greenleaf married Fred Gerard at Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan, in a second marriage for both.
  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2013

Family: Sarah E. Jones b. 22 Dec 1848, d. 22 Nov 1901

  • William Greenleaf b. Dec 1871
  • Lars Chamberlain Greenleaf b. 20 Aug 1873, d. before 1900
  • Charles S. Greenleaf b. 19 Jan 1877
  • Walter Lee Greenleaf b. 13 Sep 1879, d. 26 Sep 1950
  • Daughter Greenleaf b. 6 Sep 1882, d. before 1900
  • Fannie H. Greenleaf b. 11 Jun 1884, d. 30 Aug 1930

Henry Greenwood

b. 28 December 1835, d. 14 January 1913
  • Father: James Greenwood b. 29 Sep 1810, d. 26 Nov 1894
  • Mother: Sarah Marlow
  • Company: C
  • Henry Greenwood was born on 28 Dec 1835 at Leeds, Yorkshire, England, son of James Greenwood and Sarah Marlow.
  • Henry Greenwood was baptized on 17 Jan 1836 at Saint Peter, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.
  • His mother, Sarah Marlow, died.
  • On 8 Oct 1840 Henry's widowed father, James Greenwood, remarried to Jane [--?--] at Amsterdam, New York, if correctly identified.
  • Henry Greenwood emigrated in 1851 from England to America, and was naturalized.
  • He was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 25 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a boarding house:
    Henry Greenwood, 24, printer, b. England
    nearby, his father:
    James Greenwood, 50, shearer, b. England
    Jane, 44, b. NY
    James, 12, b. NH
    Mary C., 7, b. MA.
  • From the History of Clinton:
    The young men who worked in the "Courant" (newspaper) office during these earlier years of publication have a remarkable war record. They enlisted, one after another, untill every man who had worked there, outside of Mr. Ballard and the regular editors, was in the service of his country. Henry Bowman, Henry Greenwood, William J. Coulter, James A. Bonney and James P. Chenery were in the Light Guard...
  • In 1861 Henry was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Henry gave his occupation as printer.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 6 months and 14 days old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 Henry was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood was listed, with 88 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, as a prisoner at Richmond.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Mar 1862 Henry Greenwood, 26, married Martha Adalade Russell, 24, daughter of Abbott Russell and Martha [--?--], at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, noting that he is in the army.

  • On 20 Feb 1864 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry having reenlisted and received a bounty of $325. He was 28 years, 1 month and 23 days old.
  • On 1 Apr 1864 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the U. S. Signal Corps in the Regular Army.

  • On 27 Jul 1864, Henry was erroneously reported in the 1870 roster as a transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • Starting 16 Aug 1865, Henry also served in the U. S. Army Signal Corps until the time of mustering out by Order of the War Department.
  • Before 1866 Martha Adalade Russell, his wife, died apparently.
  • On 25 Nov 1866 Henry Greenwood, 30, married Delilah Manchester, 22, daughter of Timothy Manchester and Maria Sawyer, at Enfield, Grafton County, New Hampshire, (with registration in Clinton, MA). It is a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • Henry Greenwood and Delilah Manchester were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, he Works In Cotton Mill. One Julia A. GOODWIN, 37, b. NH, works as a servant in the house and is enumerated there. (Note: There are two English-born Henry Greenwoods in Worcester Co., but based on previious and later residence in Clinton, this appears to be the right man. Wife and children attributed to him here are based on this assumption.)
  • In 1886 Henry was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In Jun 1886 Henry Greenwood took part in the regimental reunion Excursion to the Battle-Fields of Gettysburg, PA., Antietam, MD., Ball's Bluff, Virginia and Washington, D.C.
  • He made application for a veteran's pension in Jul 1888, and received certificate number 479950.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. C.
  • In 1896, Henry was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • He and Delilah Manchester were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census in Jun 1900 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Greenwood, Henry, head, b. Dec 1836, married 34 years, b. England (as were his parents)
    ---, Deliah, wife, b. July 1841, two of her four children are still living, b. VT.
  • On 21 Oct 1903 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood attended the 37th annual regimental reunion with some eighty other veterans.
  • In 1906 Henry was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Oct 1906 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood attended the 40th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 75 other veterans of the regiment. (Report believed to be from the Worcester Spy.)
  • On 21 Oct 1907 at Grand Army Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts, Henry Greenwood attended the 41st annual regimental reunion and banquet on the 46th anniversary of the Battle of Ball's Bluff, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel the following day.
  • He and Delilah Manchester were enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 26 Apr 1910 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Henry Greenwood died on 14 Jan 1913 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 77 years and 17 days old.
  • He was buried on 17 Jan 1913 at Woodlawn Cemetery, Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Feb 1913 Delilah Manchester received a pension to surviving family member based on Henry's service; his wife, received certificate number 756977.
  • Delilah outlived Henry and died on 19 Mar 1922 at Lebanon, Smith County, Kansas, at age 77.
  • The personal papers or letters of Henry Greenwood are available at at Clinton Historical Society, Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, consisting of a diary.
  • Last Edited: 25 Oct 2016

Family 1: Martha Adalade Russell b. 4 Jul 1837, d. before 1866

Family 2: Delilah Manchester b. 14 Jul 1844, d. 19 Mar 1922

  • Adelaide Lillian Greenwood b. 30 Apr 1868, d. 23 Jun 1871
  • Fred Henry Greenwood b. 6 Jan 1870, d. 12 Mar 1932
  • Walter Manchester Greenwood b. 7 Sep 1872, d. 20 Feb 1873
  • Harry Delbert Greenwood b. 10 Nov 1875, d. 1962

Gusippa Griffa

b. between 1830 and 1831
  • Company: D
  • Gusippa Griffa was born between 1830 - 1831 at Italy.
  • In 1863 Gusippa was living at unknown.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1863, Gusippa gave his occupation as inn keeper, in the MASSCW, and iron-keeper in Ford's history.

  • On 16 Jul 1863 Gusippa mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • On 27 Nov 1863 Gusippa was taken prisoner at Mine Run, Virginia.
  • On 27 Nov 1863 Gusippa ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts when he was reported missing.

  • Before Dec 1864, Gusippa was paroled from prison.
  • Starting Apr 1865, Gusippa also served in the assigned to 20th Massachusetts Infantry, Company "G."
  • He ended his service by mustering out on 16 Jul 1865.
  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2012

Charles Edwin Griswold

b. 10 September 1837, d. 23 April 1885
  • Father: William W. Griswold b. Feb 1813, d. 27 Aug 1863
  • Mother: Sarah T. Tyler b. 12 Apr 1812, d. 13 Mar 1886
  • Company: B
  • Charles Edwin Griswold was born on 10 Sep 1837 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of William W. Griswold and Sarah T. Tyler.
  • Charles Edwin Griswold was enumerated in the household of William W. Griswold and Sarah T. Tyler in the 1850 US Federal Census on 6 Aug 1850 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William W. Griswold, 37, m, watchmaker, $500, b. NH
    Sarah F., 38, b. VT
    William F., 14
    **Charles E., 12
    Augustus, 11
    Thomas, 8
    Albert, 6, m
    Rebecca S., 2, f
    Jeremiah, " W(?), 67, m, watchmaker $500, b. NH.
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Charles gave his occupation as hat finisher.
  • Charles Edwin Griswold and William Tyler Griswold, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Company B.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 10 months and 2 days old.
  • On 4 Aug 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Charles Edwin Griswold was listed among the sick and wounded soldiers arriving off the S. R. Spaulding, Elm City, and St. Mark at Philadelphia.
  • On 27 Aug 1862 William W. Griswold, his father, enlisted in Company K, Massachusetts 36th Infantry Regiment, and mustered out on 03 Dec 1862.
  • On 28 Feb 1863 Charles ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, due to disability.

  • On 27 Aug 1863 his father, William W. Griswold, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 50.
  • Thomas Erven Griswold, his brother, enlisted from Fitchburg, age 22, Aug 25, 1864 in Co H, Mass 4th Heavy Artillery Regt, and mustered out Jun 17, 1865 at Washington, D.C.
  • Charles Edwin Griswold made application for a veteran's pension on 18 Jan 1864.
  • On 20 Aug 1864 Albert Griswold, his brother, enlisted in Company H, Massachusetts 4th Heavy Artillery Regiment and mustered out on 17 Jun 1865 at Washington, DC.
  • On 28 Jan 1868 Charles Edwin Griswold, 30, married Catherine Maria Gibbs, 25, daughter of George W. Gibbs and Catherine G. Winch.
  • On 4 Jul 1868 Charles Edwin Griswold was included on the Civil War memorial at Main Street, Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, From the "Massachusetts Spy," (Worcester, Massachusetts), 17 July 1868:
    A very fine soldiers' monument of Fitchburg granite, with curb of the same material, was dedicated in Westminster, July 4. It stands 22 1/2 feet high, the names of 82 soldiers being on marble slabs attached to the sides of the monument.
    The dedicatory services proper consisted of prayer, singing of an original ode, floral demonstration, an address, the reading of a poem, and the playing of a dirge by the Gardner Brass Band. A free dinner was provided in the grove....speeches were made by Captain Holden and General Kimball....
  • On 1 Jul 1879 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Edwin Griswold attended the annual reunion of Company B, 15th Massachusetts, the Fitchburg Fisiliers. (Click icon to read the report in the Fitchburg Sentinel.)
  • He and Catherine Maria Gibbs were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with no children enumerated.
  • Charles Edwin Griswold was a pall bearer at the burial of James E. May on 30 Jun 1880 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Div. 1, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Charles Edwin Griswold attended the funeral of Roland Edwin Bowen in Jan 1883 at Millbury Central Cemetery, Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Oct 1883 Charles Edwin Griswold included on the official government pension rolls for Fitchburg and Leominster, as published in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • He died on 23 Apr 1885 at Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of Chronic Rheumatism. He was 47 years, 7 months and 13 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1885 at Woodside Cemetery, Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 14 May 1885 Catherine Maria Gibbs received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Charles's service; received certificate 215764.
  • William, his brother, outlived Charles and died on 29 Apr 1901 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, at age 65.
  • On 21 Feb 1906 the Fitchburg Sentinel ran a short piece about a sled enjoyed by three future members of the 15th Massachusetts -- George T. Daniels and the Griswold brothers, Edwin and William -- when they were boys.
  • Last Edited: 10 Apr 2016

Family: Catherine Maria Gibbs b. 22 Dec 1842

William Tyler Griswold

b. 1 April 1836, d. 29 April 1901

William T. Griswold
  • Father: William W. Griswold b. Feb 1813, d. 27 Aug 1863
  • Mother: Sarah T. Tyler b. 12 Apr 1812, d. 13 Mar 1886
  • Company: B
  • William Tyler Griswold was born on 1 Apr 1836 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of William W. Griswold and Sarah T. Tyler.
  • William Tyler Griswold was enumerated in the household of William W. Griswold and Sarah T. Tyler in the 1850 US Federal Census on 6 Aug 1850 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William W. Griswold, 37, m, watchmaker, $500, b. NH
    Sarah F., 38, b. VT
    William F., 14
    **Charles E., 12
    Augustus, 11
    Thomas, 8
    Albert, 6, m
    Rebecca S., 2, f
    Jeremiah, " W(?), 67, m, watchmaker $500, b. NH.
  • In 1861 William was living at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, William gave his occupation as hat finisher.
  • William Tyler Griswold and Charles Edwin Griswold, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Company B.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 3 months and 11 days old.
  • On 27 Aug 1862 William W. Griswold, his father, enlisted in Company K, Massachusetts 36th Infantry Regiment, and mustered out on 03 Dec 1862.
  • On 27 Aug 1863 his father, William W. Griswold, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 50.
  • Thomas Erven Griswold, his brother, enlisted from Fitchburg, age 22, Aug 25, 1864 in Co H, Mass 4th Heavy Artillery Regt, and mustered out Jun 17, 1865 at Washington, D.C.
  • On 15 Jan 1864 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • On 20 Aug 1864 Albert Griswold, his brother, enlisted in Company H, Massachusetts 4th Heavy Artillery Regiment and mustered out on 17 Jun 1865 at Washington, DC.
  • On 15 Sep 1869 William Tyler Griswold, 33, married Isabel Mary Byram, 22, daughter of Ebenezer Gay Byram and Izanah Capen, at Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine.
  • William Tyler Griswold and Isabel Mary Byram were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 10 Jun 1880 at Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts, with a 10-month old, Leon S. GRISWOLD.
  • On 23 Apr 1885 his brother, Charles Edwin Griswold, died at Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 47 of Chronic Rheumatism.
  • In Jun 1886 William was living at Monson, Hampden County, Massachusetts.
  • On 9 Jun 1887 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William was mentioned as follows:
    "William T. Griswold, oldest brother of Thomas E. Griswold and a veteran of Co. B, of the old 15th regiment, is preparing to make his home at Los Angeles, Cal. His family have spent the winter at San Francisco."
  • On 11 May 1898 at "The Fitchburg Sentinel", Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Tyler Griswold was mentioned in an article as an original member of the Fitchburg Fusiliers.
  • He and Isabel Mary Byram were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1900 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, as:
    Wm J Griswold, 64
    Mary J Griswold , 52, her one child is living
    Leon S Griswold, 20
    Ella Johnson, 27.
  • On 28 Jun 1900 at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Tyler Griswold wrote a letter which was read at a reunion of Company B of the 15th Massachusetts. Click icon to read the report in the Fitchburg Sentenel.
  • He made application at California for a veteran's pension in Mar 1901, and received certificate number 1042761.
  • He died on 29 Apr 1901 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. He was 65 years and 28 days old.
  • He was buried in Apr 1901 at San Francisco Columbarium, San Francisco, San Francisco County, California.
  • In May 1901 Isabel Mary Byram received a pension to surviving family member in California based on William's service; received certificate number 533479.
  • On 29 Jun 1901 William Tyler Griswold was noted as deceased at the 40th reunion of Company B.
  • On 21 Feb 1906 the Fitchburg Sentinel ran a short piece about a sled enjoyed by three future members of the 15th Massachusetts -- George T. Daniels and the Griswold brothers, Edwin and William -- when they were boys.
  • He's surviving family was enumerated in the household of Leon Sedquick Griswold in the 1910 US Federal Census in 1910 as:
    Leon S Griswold      30
    Mildred A Griswold, (Leon's wife), 41
    Mary Isabel Griswold, 62( his mother.)
  • William's wife, Isabel Mary Byram, died and was buried in Jul 1922 at San Francisco Columbarium, San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, at age 75 years and 1 month.
  • William's son, Leon Sedquick Griswold, died and was buried in Jan 1965 at Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, at age 85 years and 5 months.
  • Last Edited: 18 Apr 2016

Family: Isabel Mary Byram b. Jun 1847, d. 30 Jul 1922

  • Leon Sedquick Griswold b. 29 Jul 1879, d. 9 Jan 1965

John (Johannes) Grob

b. 1825, d. 9 September 1864
  • Company: E
  • John (Johannes) Grob was born in 1825 at Hirzel, District of Horgen, Canton of Zurich, Switzerland.
  • On 9 Sep 1851 John (Johannes) Grob married Katharine Koch, 25, daughter of Jakob Koch and Ursula Domenig, at Basel, Canton of Basel, Switzerland.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, John gave his occupation as clerk.

  • On 1 Aug 1863 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 38 years old.
  • On 12 May 1864 John was wounded at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia.
  • He was declared missing in action on 12 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia.
  • On 25 May 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John (Johannes) Grob was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 John ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • He died on 9 Sep 1864 at Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, of scorbutus as a prisoner of war. He was 39 years old.
  • He was buried after Sep 1864 at Andersonville National Cemetery, Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, in grave # 8277.
  • On 3 Sep 1867 Katharine Koch received a pension to surviving family member in Switzerland based on John's service; his wife, making application through the U. S. Consul in Zurich, Switzerland, received certificate 108060.
  • Katharine, his wife, outlived John and died on 28 Jul 1907 at Erlenbach, Canton of Zurich, Switzerland, at age 81.
  • Last Edited: 18 Apr 2016

Family: Katharine Koch b. 4 Feb 1826, d. 28 Jul 1907

  • Jacob Grob b. 17 Oct 1851
  • Adolf Grob b. 4 Feb 1862

Augustus Grobitz

b. 1822, d. 14 June 1862
  • Company: K
  • Augustus Grobitz was born in 1822 at Gera, Fürstentum Reuss Juengerer Linie, Thuringia, Germany.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Augustus gave his occupation as weaver.
  • In 1861 Augustus was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 Augustus mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 39 years old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Augustus Grobitz was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • He died on 14 Jun 1862 at New York City, New York, of disease. He was 40 years old.
  • He was buried in Jun 1862 at Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, Plot: SECTION 1 SITE 86.
  • An obituary for Augustus Grobitz was published on 23 Jun 1862 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: Obituary -
    Among the wounded soldiers in the battle of Ball's Bluff, whose names deserve honorable mention, was Mr. August Groebitz, a native of Gera, Germany. He had lived in this country about seven years. He enlisted in the cause of freedom, in Co. K, 15th Massachusetts regiment, and was severely wounded in the leg, in the memorable contest of Oct. 21, 1861. He was carried a prisoner, first to Richmond, Va., and afterwards to Salisbury, N. C; and , released recently, was sent to new York, where he died in one of the hospitals, of lung fever. He had no relatives in this country. His age was 40 years, and he was unmarried.
  • Last Edited: 10 Apr 2016

Henry Groh

b. October 1839, d. 28 February 1910
  • Father: John Groh
  • Mother: Maria [--?--]
  • Company: I
  • Henry Groh was born in Oct 1839 at Hamburg, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, son of John Groh and Maria [--?--].
  • On 29 Jul 1857 Henry Groh was included on a passenger list of the "Indiana", arriving New York City Harbor, New York, alone with other steerage passengers, age 17, farmer, from Hanover via Bremen, with destination Massachusetts.
  • He emigrated in 1857 from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, according to the 1900 census.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Henry gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Henry was living at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 20 May 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years and 7 months old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • John Floyd Maley wrote a letter to The Webster Times, listing his fellow prisoners, on 27 Oct 1861 from Richmond, Virginia, mentioning Henry Groh, as follows.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Groh was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Weekley Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Groh was listed as a Company I casualty of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Henry Groh was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Groh was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 4 Feb 1863 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 3 Apr 1866 Henry Groh, 26, married Adolphine C. Andre, 20, daughter of John Andre and Willimena Mox, at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Henry Groh and Adolphine C. Andre were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 17 Jun 1880 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Groh, Henry, 40, shoemaker, b. Prussia
    ---, Adelphia, 34, wife, b. Hanover
    ---, Catherine, 12, daur, b. MA
    ---, Mary, 9, daur, b. MA.
  • Henry Groh was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company I.
  • On 15 Jun 1891 Henry and Adolphine's daughter, Catherine W. Groh married John Munch at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Henry Groh made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in Jul 1892, and received certificate number 854421.
  • On 13 Sep 1899 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Groh was mentioned as one of the surviving members of the old Slater Guard in Webster and Dudley.
  • He and Adolphine C. Andre were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 9 Jun 1900 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 5 Jul 1906 Henry Groh attended the 39th annual reunion of the association of companies E and I.
  • Henry's wife, Adolphine C. Andre, died and was buried in Jan 1907 at Calvary Cemetery, Dudley, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 60 years and 9 months.
  • On 4 Jul 1907 Henry Groh was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • Henry Groh was millhand, at the time of his death.
  • He died on 28 Feb 1910 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of Chronic Nephritis.. He was 70 years and 4 months old.
  • He was buried on 2 Mar 1910 at Mount Zion Cemetery (East Village), Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • An obituary for Henry Groh was published on 3 Mar 1910 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: (Volume 51 #48)
    Henry Groh, 70 years and 4 months old, died at his home, 48 Lake street Monday night, from Bright's disease. He was born in Germany, coming to Webster in 1858. He was a shoemaker by trade. At the outbreak of the civil War, Mr. Groh enlisted in Co. I, 15th Massachusetts Infantry, which company mustered from Webster, and served under Capt. Amos Bartlett. He was a member of Nathaniel Lyon Post, G. A. R. Mr. Groh is survived by a brother, Charles, of Dudley, two daughters, Mrs. Katherine Munch, Webster, and Mary, wife of Charles Lane, Lyon (Lynn?), and a son, G. H. Groh of Lynn.
    The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, at 2 o’clock, from the home. Rev. Thomas H. Vincent officiated. Misses Minnie Brandes and Nellie Wood sang “Abide With Me”, “Looking This Way” and “My Jesus As Thou Wilt”. A delegation from Nathaniel Lyon Post, G. A. R. attended. The bearers were Thomas Whalen, Christopher Holly, Elias Wakefield, and Hiram Raymond. Burial was in East Village cemetery.
  • On 27 Oct 1910 Henry Groh was reported as deceased at the 44th regimental reunion.
  • Last Edited: 29 Jun 2017

Family: Adolphine C. Andre b. 6 Mar 1846, d. 31 Jan 1907

  • Catherine W. Groh b. 6 Apr 1868
  • Henry Groh b. 1 Jul 1870, d. before 1883
  • Anne Ellen Groh b. 21 Jul 1874, d. before 1880
  • Mary Groh b. Jul 1879
  • John Henry Groh b. 6 Sep 1883

John William "Willie" Grout

b. 25 July 1843, d. 21 October 1861

Willie Grout
  • Father: Jonathan Grout b. 24 Sep 1815, d. 4 Apr 1882
  • Mother: Mary J. Smith b. 1817, d. 8 Mar 1896
  • Company: D
  • John W. Grout was born on 25 Jul 1843 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Jonathan Grout and Mary J. Smith.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, John gave his occupation as student.

  • On 1 Aug 1861 John mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a 2nd Lieutenant, being credited to the quota of Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 18 years and 7 days old.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John William "Willie" Grout was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • He died on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, shot in the back of the head during the retreat according to a letter from Henry C. Ward on 10 November. He was 18 years, 2 months and 26 days old.
  • He was buried in Oct 1861 at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where his parents later joined him.
  • Charles Martin Hersey wrote a letter to Martin Hersey, his father, in Oct 1861, mentioning John William "Willie" Grout, as follows: and it was published in the Southbridge Journal, mentioning others in the regiment.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John William "Willie" Grout was mentioned in dispatches or (not necessarily correctly) among the casualties of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, John William "Willie" Grout was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 3 Nov 1861 his body was recovered from the river at Long Bridge, above Washington.
  • An obituary for John William "Willie" Grout was published on 6 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows:
    Lieutenant J. William Grout
    In the list of killed at the battle of Ball’s Bluff is the name of the young officer at the head of this article. He was the only son of Jonathan Grout Esq., and was born in this city in 1843. It seems but as yesterday that he moved among us, a shy and unassuming boy, beloved by his associates, and familiarly known as Willie Grout. He early evinced a love for military pursuits, and when only five years old said to his teacher, when asked what he would like to be when a man “I want to be Zachary Taylor.” When leaving home a few years since, to enter Philips Academy, he took with him a drum, as a companion for his hours of recreation. For two or three years past his mind had been in a state of unrest on account of his inability to decide upon a profession for life, nothing proposed seeming to meet the demands of his nature; and it was not until he entered the Highlands School in this city that he found, in the military department, especially, his tastes gratified. He became a member of the Highland Cadets, and for a year or more was captain of the company.
    When war was declared he expressed a wish at once to enter the army, but his parents withheld their consent, chiefly on account of his youth. When, however , they yielded to his importunities, his joy knew no bounds, and with all the ardor of his nature, he engaged in the work of preparation for his new calling. he slept on the floor of his chamber, in order to inure himself of the hardships of the camp. His knowledge of military tactics was such, that his service as a drill officer , were in constant demand; and in this capacity he passed many pleasant hours the past summer, with the young men of this city and vicinity. When Massachusetts 15th regiment was organized, he received the commission of second lieutenant of company D, an honor rarely bestowed upon so young a person. He was very popular in his company, and in the regiment generally. His numerous friends who saw him in camp, will recall his manly form, the crimson glow of health that mantled his cheeks, and his fine military bearing all combined to make him “every inch a soldier.” To one who took his hand the day of departure of his regiment, remarking, “I hope there will be no fighting,” he replied,” If there is to be any I want to be there.”
    And he was here and nobly did he discharge his duty it was observed that he displayed a great coolness and bravery, and in one instance , at least, his right arm did signal execution. When all hope had fled, and the day was evidently lost, and the order to retreat given he knew that he and his associates had done all that men could do, and that Massachusetts had reason to be proud of the conduct of her sons, on that dreadful field of blood and carnage. Alas that even then his work was done, and his warfare finished.
    He had gained the middle of the stream, and would soon have reached the opposite bank, when a fatal shot pierced him, and he exclaimed, “Tell company D I could have reached the shore, but I am shot, I must sink!” and as the waters closed over him, the spirit took its flight, to be forever free of the throes and conflicts of earth. When his death was announced, Col. Devens remarked, with deep emotion, “Dear little fellow, he came to me at the close of he battle and said,” Colonel is there anything more I can do for you?” I replied “nothing , but to take care of yourself. ”Similar testimony to his bravery and fidelity , has been received from numerous sources.
    It is an impressive illustration of the desolations caused by war, that while we are writing, after a search such as paternal agony only could induce, his bereaved father is returning to his now desolate home, without even the consolation of bringing him back with him what was mortal of the idol of his affections. Let us hope however, that the Potomac, whose waters are associated with memories dear to every American heart, will yet yield up the youthful dead, and permit his ashes to find a last resting place among sepulchres of the fathers.
    And now generous companion and brave young soldier, farewell! Thy memory will long be green in many hearts, and thy native city will cherish, among the memorials of her honored sons, the name of him, who in his eighteenth summer, laid himself a willing sacrifice upon the altar of his country.
    The record of that sad conflict of Ball’s Bluff, tell the story of the fall of one of the oldest and one of the youngest of the Union forces. One, high in political position and the pride of the western domain(let the tear of charity forever erase the remembrance of his mistakes, if any he made, for he was a peerless man, and a tower of strength to the nation); the other, a fitting representative of the unconquerable pluck and the chivalrous daring of the young men of the oldest commonwealth in the in the Union. Thus were united upon the same altar of patriotism and love of country, the Atlantic and the Pacific, the blossoms of youth and the frosts of age! Oh, who, in view of such pledges and such consecrations, can dispair, whatever may be the reverses of the moment, and the final triumph of the republic! H. S. W.
  • On 13 Nov 1861 was mentioned in the Worcester Spy (Volume 90 # 45):
    The Late Lieut. Grout ---The remains of the late Lieut Grout arrived in this city Sunday morning by the boat train from New York. The body was taken from the Potomac on Tuesday last, at Long Bridge, in connection with five other bodies which had floated down to that point, and all of them were immediately buried. On Thursday they were disintered, and the body of Lieut. Grout idntified by the name upon a portion of the clothing. The body was immediately enclosed in a metalic coffin, and forwarded by express.
  • On 15 Jul 1874 John William "Willie" Grout was included on the Civil War memorial at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Jonathan Grout, his father., survived John and died on 4 Apr 1882 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 66.
  • From Ford's history of the 15th -
    The extreme youth, the engaging personality, the freehanded generosity, the thorough knowledge of military tactics, the earnestness of purpose and the intense patriotism of Second-Lieutenant John William Grout, made him one of the best known, best loved and most highly respected officers of the regiment. His loss therefore was felt with especial keenness by all the members of the Fifteenth and a halo of romance has gathered around his story. When, in later years, a camp of the Sons of Veterans was organized in Worcester, it was fittingly called the "Willie Grout Camp," as no nobler personification could be found than he, of the ideas which this order represents.
    At the battle of Ball’s Bluff he exhibited great coolness and bravery. It was not until November 5, that his body was discovered, and then it was sent to his family in Worcester and laid to rest November 12 with the most impressive ceremonies.
    The well-known song entitled, "The Vacant Chair," was written in his memory....."
  • Click icon to read about him from Crane's history of Worcester County -
    Lieutenant John W. Grout was a 7th generation descendant of Captain John Grout (I), of Watertown and Sudbury, Massachusetts who came from England with his gun in his hand and first settled at Watertown about 1640. (Note: the intervening generations are omitted here, but documented in the original source book. slh)
    He was the only son of Jonathan (6) and Mary J. (Smith) Grout, born July 25, 1843, and was barely old enough to claim a man's standing when he fell a voluntary sacrifice on the altar of his country, in the civil war period. He was fine and manly in his features, and with elastic vigor, and the "crimson glow of health" he seemed every inch a soldier. His was a rare combination of qualities. He was an accomplished pianist, was also proficient in mathematics, and had an art for drawing, to which he added some knowledge of the French language and of ancient classics. In early youth he exhibited signs of military genius. A treasured specimen is a whittled dagger with a Union shield on it, now doubly prized. He entered the military department of Caleb B. Metcalf's Highland school at Worcester and became an expert in tactics. This peculiarly fitted him, when the Rebellion opened up, for active, useful service. Upon the organization of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment he was welcomed to Company D as its second lieutenant, and he drilled the company until it went to the front. True to his retiring nature he chose some secluded spot in which to drill his men.
    The story of Leesburg (Balls Bluff), October 21, 1861, is familiar to many, and is a matter of war department record, but we wish here to make mention of the fact enacted by him of whom we write. The Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment was in the thickest of the fight and suffered great loss. Lieutenant Grout was found adequate to his duties. His coolness and self-possession astonished all of his men. In the terrific showers of leaden hail, Providence shielded him from harm. Upon the foe, who would bayonet a wounded soldier, he executed summary wrath. Every blow of his own sword told in hand-to-hand contest. He declared he would never surrender alive. Compelled to retreat, his coolness was still maintained. Driven to the bank of the river, he still forgot himself, in the service being rendered to make good the escape of his command. With inadequate means for transportation he crossed the stream with the wounded men and returned; again the frail boat was filled to its capacity and he remained upon the shore, but he had risked too much for his own safety. The remainder were now reduced to the last extremity, and when the young lieutenant went up to his superior, with the calm but heroic enquiry,
    "Is there anything more I can do?" the reply of Colonel Devens was, "Nothing but take care of yourself." And when the Colonel cried to his brave men, "I shall never surrender!" and with benediction, "God be with you all," gave the final order, "Every man for himself," Lieutenant Grout had done his duty, and nobly justified the highest expectations of his admirers.
    After waiting for the first faint glimpse of the rising moon, he threw his incumbrances beyond recovery, and with a few companions plunged into the stream, but before he could reach the opposite shore, the fatal ball of the barbarous assassin left him only time and strength to exclaim,
    "Tell Company D that I should have escaped, but I am shot." He was lost in the dark rolling waters of the Potomac, but after some time the river yielded up the treasure, and under the flag of his heroic love he was borne from the paternal mansion "to the house appointed for all living."
    We are indebted for the facts here given to a memorial written by Rev. E. Cutler, soon after the gallant soldier was killed, and it is a priceless gem among the family possessions, and they have thus had it inserted in this volume to further perpetuate the pathetic story of one who gave up his young life to save his comrades--and his country as well.
  • An article about "The Vacant Chair: The Hero and the Author of the Song," appeared in the New England Magazine, April, 1897, Vol. XVI, No. 2, by Herbert L. Jillson.
    It was available to read online in the "Making of America" collection at Cornell University Library.
  • On 25 Nov 1892 John White Kimball gave his eye-witness account of the Battle of Ball's Bluff to the Boston Journal, and it was reprinted in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2016

Oscar Loring Guild

b. 21 February 1843, d. 28 July 1912
  • Father: Mauran Harlow Guild b. 25 Mar 1820, d. 16 Mar 1883
  • Mother: Hannah Ann Levens
  • Company: E
  • Oscar Loring Guild was born on 21 Feb 1843 at Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Mauran Harlow Guild and Hannah Ann Levens.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Oscar gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Oscar mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a musician, being credited to the quota of Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 18 years, 4 months and 21 days old.
  • On 1 Mar 1862, Harlow M. Guild, his father, was enlisted in the 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Co. B, as a Lieutenant, and mustered out 14 February 1865.
  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Oscar Loring Guild was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • On 27 Mar 1864 Oscar ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by transfer to the Veterans' Reserve Corps.

  • He ended his service with the 24th V.R.C., Co A on 15 Nov 1865.
  • On 24 Nov 1867 Oscar Loring Guild, 24, married Nellie M. Whittemore, 18, daughter of James M. Whittemore and Sarah E. Pratt, at Paxton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1879 Oscar was living at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Oscar Loring Guild was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Nellie M. Whittemore were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1880 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, as:
    Guild, Oscar L., 37, boarder, works in shoeshop, b. MA
    ---, Nellie, 30, boarder, b. MA
    (along with many others.)
  • In 1887 Oscar Loring Guild was "now engaged in shoe-making " according to the Guild Genealogy.
  • On 25 Jun 1887 Oscar and Nellie's daughter, Isadora Guild married Henry F. Mathewson at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Oscar Loring Guild was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company E as a musician.
  • On 28 Jun 1890 at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Oscar Loring Guild attended the 23rd annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension in 1891, and received certificate number 1007501.
  • On 8 Jul 1892 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Oscar Loring Guild was reported among those attending a reunion of Company E.
  • On 7 Jul 1893 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Oscar Loring Guild was reported as attending the 26th annuel meeting of the Company E association. From The Webster Times, July 7, 1893(Volume XXXVI # 19)
    Company E. Association, 15th Regiment, M. V. M., held its 26th annual meeting in Memorial Hall last week. Roll Call at 11a. m., business meeting, 11:30; dinner at 1 p. m. prepared by Comrade Yeomans and wife. The survivors were called to order by President W. F. Miller. The roll call showed that the only death reported during the year was that of Patrick Feigan, who died in Boston, April 7, 1893, and was buried in St. Roch cemetery of Oxford.
    The following officers were elected for the coming year; President, W. F. Miller of Worcester; Vice President, P. F. Murray of Worcester; Secretary and Treasurer L. E. Thayer of Oxford; Directors, A. B. Yeomans of Oxford, John Humphrey of Oxford, and Oscar L. Guild of Lynn.
    Among the speakers were Rev. Albert Tyler who invoked the blessing; Capt. Murray of Worcester; Capt. B. B. Vassal of Worcester; Secretary L. E. Thayer of Oxford; Caleb F. Dudley; John Humphrey who left an arm at Antietam; Edward Lovely of Spencer; A. B. Hudson of Grafton; and Robert Lusty of Palmer who left a leg at Gettysburg.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 2 Jun 1900 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, as a lodger, married 34 years, but without his wife.
  • Oscar Loring Guild was was one of many soldiers who resided at one time or another at Soldiers' Home, Crest Avenue, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 28 Jul 1912 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He was 69 years, 5 months and 7 days old.
  • He was buried in Jul 1912 at Forest Dale Cemetery, Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
  • Oscar's widow, Nellie M. Whittemore remarried to Mr. [--?--] Beals.
  • On 5 Nov 1931 Nellie M. Whittemore received a pension to surviving family member in California based on Oscar's service; made application number 1705550; but no certificate is recorded.
  • The Guild Genealogy says Oscar's father, "..served in the New York Volunteers in the Mexican War (1843), worked in the mines of California three years, and was a lieutenant in the 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry during the Rebellion. He (the father) died at Moss Bluffs, Fla., March 16, 1883."
  • Last Edited: 2 May 2016

Family: Nellie M. Whittemore b. 17 Oct 1849

  • Charles F. Guild b. 1868
  • Isadora Guild b. 12 May 1869
  • Mildred D. Guild b. 1883

George William Gunston

b. 6 April 1837, d. 1 November 1905
  • Father: James Gunston b. 1803, d. Sep 1841
  • Mother: Sarah Mead b. 1805, d. Sep 1843
  • Company: E
  • George William Gunston was born on 6 Apr 1837 at Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England, son of James Gunston and Sarah Mead.
  • George William Gunston was baptized on 22 Jun 1837 at Trowbridge, Wiltshire, England.
  • He was enumerated in the household of James Gunston and Sarah Mead in the 1841 UK Census in Apr 1841 at Corsley, Wiltshire, England, as:
    James Gunston, 38, cloth lab., b. Wiltshire (as were all in the family)
    Sarah, 37
    Phillip, 18, cloth lab.
    James, 9
    Ann, 7
    Sarah, 5
    **George, 6
    John, 2
    Eliza, 1.
  • George William Gunston emigrated in 1848 from England and was later naturalized.
  • On 23 Mar 1859 George William Gunston, 21, married Sarah Ann Richardson at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as operative.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 24 years, 3 months and 6 days old.
  • On 13 Dec 1862 George was taken prisoner at The Battle of Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County, Virginia.
  • On 11 Apr 1863 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George William Gunston was included in the published list of Oxford volunteers.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service.

  • He and Sarah Ann Richardson were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 3 Aug 1870 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Gunston, George W., 33, jack spinner, b. England
    ---, Sarah A., 30, b. CT
    ---, Eugene W., 10, b. MA
    ---, George F., 2, b. RI.
  • George William Gunston and Sarah Ann Richardson were enumerated in the State census in 1875 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    George W Gunston, 38
    Sarah A Gunston, 35
    Eugene Gunston, 14
    George F Gunston, 6
    Mary E Gunston, 3.
  • On 1 Aug 1875 his son, Henry Gunston, died at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, age 20 hours, along with his twin sister.
  • In 1879 George was living at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, where he works for Corliss Steam Engine Works.
  • On 5 Jul 1879 at "The Webster Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George William Gunston was mentioned in the report on the 12th annual reunion of Company E, 15th Massachusetts Infantry.
  • He and Sarah Ann Richardson were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 12 Jun 1880 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Gunston, George, 43, machinist, b. England (and his parents)
    ---, Sarah, 40, wife, b. CT
    ---, Eugene, 20,son, in woolen mill, b. MA
    ---, George F., 11, son, b. RI
    ---, Mary E., 8, dau, b. RI.
  • George William Gunston was included in the city directory at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, in 1884.
  • On 25 Apr 1885 Sarah Ann Richardson, his wife, died at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • About in 1887 George William Gunston married Marion [--?--].
  • George William Gunston was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, but no further information is given.
  • He made application at Wisconsin for a veteran's pension on 25 Aug 1890, and received certificate number 739680.
  • George's son, George Franklin "Frank" Gunston married Bertha Loraine White.
  • George William Gunston and Marion [--?--] were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1900 at Racine, Racine County, Wisconsin, as:
    Gunston, George Wm., head, b. June 1837, married 13 years, b. England, immigr in 1848 and nat, machinist
    ---, Marion, wife, b. June 1837 in MA, no children.
  • In 1904 George William Gunston was described as 5' 5", with a dark complexion, dark eyes and gray hair, married.
  • On 13 May 1904, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois, George was admitted.
  • On 3 Aug 1904, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois, George was discharged at his own request.
  • He died on 1 Nov 1905 at Worcester Insane Hospital, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of dementia. He was 68 years, 6 months and 26 days old.
  • He was buried in Nov 1905 at North Cemetery, Main Street, Oxford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2016

Family 1: Sarah Ann Richardson b. between 1839 - 1840, d. 25 Apr 1885

  • Eugene W. Gunston b. 27 Mar 1860, d. 11 Oct 1925
  • Charles Gunston b. 25 Apr 1865
  • Lillie May Gunston b. 16 May 1867
  • George Franklin "Frank" Gunston b. 14 Dec 1868, d. 11 Jun 1929
  • Mary Elizabeth Gunston b. Dec 1871, d. 15 Aug 1933
  • Henry Gunston b. 1 Aug 1875, d. 1 Aug 1875
  • Sarah Gunston b. 1 Aug 1875, d. 1 Aug 1875

Family 2: Marion [--?--] b. Jun 1837

George Hadfield

b. between 1824 and 1825
  • Company: I
  • George Hadfield was born between 1824 - 1825 at England.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as spinner.
  • In 1861 George was living at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was married at the time of his enlistment according to Ford's history.
  • George was living at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to the Webster Times.

  • On 1 Aug 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • John Floyd Maley wrote a letter to The Webster Times, listing his fellow prisoners, on 27 Oct 1861 from Richmond, Virginia, mentioning George Hadfield, as follows.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hadfield was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Weekley Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hadfield was listed as a Company I casualty of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 George Hadfield was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hatfield was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, George Hadfield was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 2 Nov 1862 George ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by desertion.

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2012