William Walker

b. between 1834 and 1835, d. 21 October 1861
  • Company: C
  • William Walker was born between 1834 - 1835 at Prussia, (Germany).
  • He was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 23 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    William Walker, 25, weaver, b. Prussia (Germany)
    in the household of:
    Anton Wiesman, 30, weaver, b. Prussia (Germany), and his family and other weavers, all from Germany.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, William gave his occupation as weaver.
  • In 1861 William was living at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He died on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, William Walker was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • There is a burial for William Walker on Jasmine Path Laurel Hill Cemetery, Div. 3, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts . This needs viewing to verify if he is 15th Mass.
  • In 1896, William was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts."
  • Last Edited: 4 Sep 2014

William Harrison Walker

b. 20 April 1841, d. 18 March 1880
  • Father: Hiram Walker b. 1 Sep 1810, d. 8 Apr 1870
  • Mother: Levanchy Allen b. 16 Jan 1814, d. 25 Oct 1865
  • Company: F
  • William Harrison Walker was born on 20 Apr 1841 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Hiram Walker and Levanchy Allen.
  • On 18 Sep 1850 Hepsibeth Howe was enumerated in the 1850 US Federal census living near William Harrison Walker at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George W. Allen, 39, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    Mary E., 27
    **George W., 4
    Edwin F., 1
    nextdoor to:
    **Alonzo Allen, 26, farmer
    Nancy J., 22
    Lucy A., 3/12
    nextdoor to:
    Hiram Walker, 40, farmer, blind
    Levanchey, 33
    Caroline E., 1
    **Warren A., 10
    **William H., 9
    Hiram F., 3
    Hepsibath, 66 (the matriarch)
    Alvord, 35.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, William gave his occupation as farmer.
  • William Harrison Walker and Warren A. Walker, and Alonzo Allen and George Warren Allen, two brothers, their cousin and an uncle, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Co. F, William joining a year later than Warren.

  • On 25 Jul 1862 William mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of South Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 21 years, 3 months and 5 days old.
  • On 19 Mar 1863 William ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 7 Sep 1864 William Harrison Walker, 23, married Sarah Jane Prince, daughter of David Prince and Harriet A. Oliver, at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • William Harrison Walker made application for a veteran's pension on 19 Sep 1864, and received certificate number 187857.
  • On 6 Jun 1865 William's brother, Warren A. Walker, married Georgiana Prince at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Note: with this marriage, the brothers also became brothers-in-law.
  • William's wife, Sarah Jane Prince, died and was buried in Aug 1867 at Brookfield Cemetery, Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: M 410 at age 23 years.
  • On 13 Oct 1868 William Harrison Walker, 27, married Henrietta S. Converse, 34, daughter of Edwin Converse and Mary Polly Munger, at Palmer, Hampden County, Massachusetts.
  • William Harrison Walker and Henrietta S. Converse were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 24 Aug 1870 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Walker, William H., 29, for boot factory, b. MA
    ---, Henrietta S., 35, b. MA.
  • William Harrison Walker died on 18 Mar 1880 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of an anurism of thorasic aorta. He was 38 years, 10 months and 27 days old.
  • He was buried in Mar 1880 at Brookfield Cemetery, Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: M 410.
  • On 15 Apr 1880 Henrietta S. Walker received a pension to surviving family member based on William's service; his wife, received certificate number 192147.
  • On 22 Dec 1881 William and William's widow, Henrietta S. Converse remarried to Sidney Albert Whiting at North Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both (sic.)
  • William's wife, Henrietta S. Walker, died and was buried in Aug 1908 at Brookfield Cemetery, Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: M 410 at age 74 years and 1 month.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family 1: Sarah Jane Prince b. 1844, d. 2 Aug 1867

Family 2: Henrietta S. Converse b. 20 Jun 1834, d. 28 Aug 1908

David O. Wallace

b. 1841, d. 4 February 1865
  • Father: David Wallace b. 15 Aug 1814, d. 21 Nov 1891
  • Mother: Sarah A. Lillis b. 8 Apr 1817, d. 16 Apr 1862
  • Company: C
  • David O. Wallace was born in 1841 at Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of David Wallace and Sarah A. Lillis.
  • David O. Wallace was enumerated in the household of David Wallace and Sarah A. Lillis in the 1850 US Federal Census on 15 Aug 1850 at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • David O. Wallace was enumerated in the household of David Wallace and Sarah A. Lillis in the 1860 US Federal Census on 3 Aug 1860 at Harvard P. O., Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    David Wallace, 45, carpenter, b. NH
    Sarah A., 42, b. NH
    Martha A., 19, b. MA (as were all the children)
    **David O., 17
    Caty A., 15
    Charles E., 12
    George W., 10
    Cara J., 6
    Henry P., 5
    Innez, 3
    Helen E., 2.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, David gave his occupation as carpenter.
  • On 22 Jan 1861 David's sister, Martha Ardelia Wallace, married Henry Bowman at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • David O. Wallace and Henry Bowman, brothers-in-law, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Company C.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 David mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Corporal, being credited to the quota of Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years old.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 David was taken prisoner at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, and wounded on the hand.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, David O. Wallace was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, David O. Wallace was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, David O. Wallace was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 16 Apr 1862 his mother, Sarah A. Lillis, died at Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in child birth at age 45.
  • On 2 Nov 1862 David deserted the 15th Massachusetts. (Note: the timing of this desertion suggests that it may have had something to do with his mother's death. slh.)
  • On 18 Oct 1863 David was regained to the regiment. (Note: the timing of his return to the regiment suggests that he may have met with Henry Bowman. slh.)
  • In Nov 1863 John W. Davis and William A. Mullett were court martialed along with David O. Wallace at Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia, as documented in case number NN-506 (National Archives, Record Group 153.)
  • On 22 Jun 1864 David was taken prisoner at Petersburg, Virginia.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 David ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as absent Prisoner of War.

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, David also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company "G."
  • On 24 Aug 1864 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, David O. Wallace was reported among the prisoners, for a total of four commissioned officers and seventy-seven enlisted men.
  • On 23 Nov 1864 David's widowed father, David Wallace, remarried to Catherine Smith at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for him and the first for her.
  • David O. Wallace died on 4 Feb 1865 at Florence, Florence County, South Carolina, of disease, as a prisoner of war, according to the MASSCW and the history of Clinton, MA. He was 24 years old.
  • He was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, Clinton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, (Note: this is believed to be a family memorial or cenotaph.
  • On 2 Dec 1890 David Wallace received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on David's service; his father, received certificate number 307456.
  • On 21 Nov 1891 his father, David Wallace, died at Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as reported in the Fitchburg Sentinel at age 77.
  • In 1896, David O. Wallace was included in "The History of Clinton, Massachusetts".
    "It has, perhaps, been noted that little has been said of the Fifteenth Regiment since the battle of Cold Harbor. The fact is, that the only three Clinton men, Lieutenant William J. Coulter, Sergeant David O. Wallace and James Clifford, out of the seventy-eight who had left home, now remained on regular duty with the regiment in the field. On the 22d of June, these three were all captured, with the rest of the Fifteenth, in an advance on the Weldon Railroad. ...."
  • Last Edited: 13 Oct 2013

Thomas Walsh

b. between 1843 and 1844
  • Company: B
  • Thomas Walsh was also known as Thomas Walch per 1870 roster.
  • Thomas Walsh was also known as Thomas Welsh per Ford's history.
  • He was born between 1843 - 1844 at Ireland.
  • Starting 4 Oct 1862, Thomas also served in the 48th Massachusetts Infantry, Co. "I" (9 months.)
  • On 21 May 1863 Thomas was taken prisoner at Plains Store, Louisiana.
  • He ended his service with by mustering out on 3 Sep 1863.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in Oct 1863, Thomas gave his occupation as bootmaker.
  • In Oct 1863 Thomas was living at Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 12 Nov 1863 Thomas mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and received a bounty of $325, being credited to the quota of Milford, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 6 May 1864 Thomas was wounded at The Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, on the arm.
  • On 27 Jul 1864 Thomas ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts by administrative transfer to the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as "absent wounded."

  • Starting 28 Jul 1864, Thomas also served in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. "K."
  • He ended his service with discharge for disability on 20 Jun 1865.
  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2012

Artemas Draper Ward

b. 20 December 1837, d. 22 December 1914

Artemas D. Ward
  • Father: Sylvanus Ward b. 25 Jan 1802, d. 28 Apr 1856
  • Mother: Anna Draper b. 28 Sep 1801, d. 5 May 1856
  • Company: F
  • Artemas Draper Ward was born on 20 Dec 1837 at Warwick, Franklin County, Massachusetts, son of Sylvanus Ward and Anna Draper.
  • Artemas Draper Ward was enumerated in the household of Sylvanus Ward and Anna Draper in the 1850 US Federal Census on 4 Sep 1850 at Warwick, Franklin County, Massachusetts, as:
    Sylvanus WARD, 48, m., Farmer, b. in MA
    Anna, 48, f.
    Harriet A., 21, f.
    Augusta M., 20, f.
    **Artemus D., 12, m.
    Edwin / Justin, 3, m.
  • Artemas Draper Ward and William L. Blood were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 18 Jun 1860 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, two future members of the 15th Massachusetts living in the same boarding house of one "Richard Litchfield", hotel keeper, and working as shoemakers.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Artemas gave his occupation as carpenter.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Artemas mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 23 years, 6 months and 22 days old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 20 Jan 1862 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward was mentioned among the released prisoners.
  • On 1 Mar 1863 Artemas was promoted to Corporal.
  • On 3 Jul 1863 Artemas was wounded at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward was reported as wounded at Gettysburg.
  • On 22 Dec 1863 Artemas was transferred from to the Veterans Reserve Corps to.
  • On 28 Jul 1864 Artemas ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts having fulfilled his term of service in Co. G of the 9th V. R. C.

  • Artemas was mentioned in "The William Ward Genealogy", 1925, p. 425:
    "He was a carpenter and builder. He served for three years in the Civil War, the latter part as corporal of Company G, 9th V. R. C. He was wounded at Gettsbury 2 Jul 1963."
  • On 15 Sep 1867 Artemas Draper Ward, 29, married Susan Elizabeth Cushman, 38, daughter of Apollos Cushman and Susannah Ripley, at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for him and the second for her. She was the widow of Danforth Boyd of Oakham.
  • Artemas Draper Ward and Susan Elizabeth Cushman were enumerated in the 1870 US Federal Census on 5 Aug 1870 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Ward, Artemus D., 32, carpenter, b. MA
    ---, Susan E., 41, $3000 real estate, $400 personal estate, b. MA
    Slayton, Henry, 26, carpenter, b. MA
    (two former members of Co. F, 15th Mass. in the same house.)
  • Artemas Draper Ward and Susan Elizabeth Cushman were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in 1880 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a Carpenter.
  • On 20 Apr 1883 Susan Elizabeth Cushman, his wife, died at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 54 of a tumor.
  • In 1890 at Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward was (or had been) a member of the Ferdinand Dexter G. A. R., Post 38, and a copy of his "personal war sketch" is now located in the Merrick Public Library.
  • Click icon to read his G. A. R. personal sketch.
  • He was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Co. F.
  • He made application at Massachusetts for a veteran's pension on 2 Mar 1892, and received certificate number 847803.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 4 Jun 1900 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he lives on Maple Terrace. He is a widower and a lodger in the house of Walter Bruce. He is employed as a carpenter and been employed only part time in the past year.
  • In 1906 Artemas was living at West Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 20 Oct 1906 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward attended the 40th annual reunion of the 15th regiment association, with some 75 other veterans of the regiment. (Report believed to be from the Worcester Spy.)
  • On 27 Oct 1910 at The State Mutual Building, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Artemas Draper Ward attended the 44th reunion of the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.
  • He died on 22 Dec 1914 at West Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 77 years and 2 days old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1914 at Brookfield Cemetery, Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: OSW 05, with his wife.
  • In 1947 his daughter, Anna D. Ward, died apparently unmarried and was buried with her parents.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Susan Elizabeth Cushman b. 6 Feb 1829, d. 20 Apr 1883

  • Anna D. Ward b. 8 Jan 1869, d. 1947

George Hull Ward

b. 26 April 1826, d. 2 July 1863

George H. Ward
  • Father: Artemas Ward 2nd b. Sep 1796, d. 17 May 1857
  • Mother: Sarah H. Fife b. 1795, d. 16 Feb 1842
  • Company: Staff
  • George Hull Ward was born on 26 Apr 1826 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Artemas Ward 2nd and Sarah H. Fife.
  • On 16 Feb 1842 his mother, Sarah H. Fife, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption.
  • In Feb 1842 George witnessed the burial of Sarah H. Fife, his mother, at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 47 years.
  • On 8 Dec 1842 George's widowed father, Artemas Ward 2nd, remarried to Hulda P. Reed at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • George Hull Ward was enumerated in the household of Artemas Ward 2nd and Hulda P. Reed in the 1850 US Federal Census on 7 Oct 1850 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Artemas Ward, 2nd, 53, farmer, $23,000, b. MA
    Huldah, 38, b. VT
    **George, 23, machinist, b. MA (as all others except noted)
    Caroline, 18
    Charles, 15
    **Henry, 7
    Samuel, 5
    Sarah, 3
    Frederick, 2
    Mary, 7/12
    Barry McMullens, 18, Laborer, b. Ireland
    Ann Bunn, 12, b. Ireland.
  • On 5 Jun 1851 George Hull Ward, 25, married Emily Elizabeth Mayo, 20, daughter of William Mayo and Sarah Dennis, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • On 27 Jun 1854 his step-mother, Hulda P. Reed, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of heart disease.
  • In Jun 1854 Henry and George witnessed the burial of Hulda P. Reed, his step-mother, at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 42 years.
  • On 17 May 1857 his father, Artemas Ward 2nd, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption at age 60.
  • George Hull Ward and Emily Elizabeth Mayo were enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 18 Jul 1860 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    George H. Ward, 34, farmer, b. MA (as were all)
    Emily, 30
    George W., 1
    Mary M. Ward, 10
    Saml Ward, 15, farm laborer
    Fred W. Ward, 12.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, George gave his occupation as machinist.
  • In 1861 George was living at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • George Hull Ward and Henry Clay Ward, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 24 Jul 1861 George mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as Lieutenant Colonel. He was 35 years, 2 months and 28 days old.
  • On 14 Aug 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hull Ward was mentioned in an article about the departure of the Fifteenth Massachusetts from Worcester.
  • On 21 Oct 1861 George was wounded at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, in the leg, requiring amputation.
  • Walter Abbott Eames wrote a letter to Sarah Ann Ames, his wife, on 22 Oct 1861, mentioning George Hull Ward, as follows.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "Worcester Aegis & Transcript", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hull Ward was mentioned among the casualties.
  • On 14 Feb 1862 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George H. Ward was mentioned as follows:
    "Lieut. Col. Ward, Lieut. H. P. Jorgensen of Co. A., Leominster, sergeant A. E. Shumway of Co. E., Oxford, sergeant Shove of Co. K., Blackstone, corporal Collar of Co. H., Northbridge, and private Ralph T. Phinney of Co. D., Worcester, have been detailed from the fifteenth regiment, for six months, to recruit for the Massachusetts regiments."
  • On 29 Apr 1862 George was promoted to Colonel (later Brevet Brigadier General.)
  • He died on 2 Jul 1863 at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania. He was 37 years, 2 months and 6 days old.
  • Henry Clay Ward wrote a letter, about his brother, on 4 Jul 1863, mentioning George Hull Ward, as follows: as published ten days later in the Worcester newspaper (click icon to read.)
  • An obituary for George Hull Ward was published on 8 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Palladium", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows.
  • On 8 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hull Ward was mentioned in the first dispatches from the Gettysburg battle.
  • He was buried on 8 Jul 1863 at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Section 29, Lot 777, after an elaborate funeral in the Salem Street Church, Worcester.
    (Note:The bronze bust shown here was removed from the cemetery by persons unknown several years ago. If you have information leading to its recovery, please contact the cemetery office.)
  • On 15 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, an account of his funeral was reported.
  • On 15 Jul 1863, at "The Worcester Palladium", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George was defended by the editor of the newspaper against apparent charges of some kind in the Boston Courrier. The nature of these charges is unknown.
  • On 15 Jul 1863, at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George was the subject of an editorial.
  • On 22 Jul 1863 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, George Hull Ward was listed as a casualty of Gettysburg.
  • In A Vast Sea of Misery:A History and Guide to the Union and Confederate Field Hospitals at Gettysburg, July 1, 1863-November 20, 1863, by Gregory A. Coco, 1988, Thomas Publications, the following is found:
    Col. George Hull Ward, wounded July 2, left leg amputated, died July 3.
  • On 15 Jul 1874 George Hull Ward was included on the Civil War memorial at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • In 1880 George Alfred Macker and George Hull Ward, provided a narrative of George H. Ward's death for Mrs. Ward, which was printed in Marvin's "History of Worcester."
  • On 7 Jun 1888 George's son, Robert Lincoln Ward married Alice Kent Amsden at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • A memorial to George H. Ward was placed on the Gettysberg battlefield by the 15th Massachusetts Regiment. It is similar to his grave marker in the Rural Cemetery in Worcester. Note, however, that the bust on the marker in Worcester was stolen a few years back. Any information leading to it's return would be greatly appreciated.
  • Emily Elizabeth Mayo was enumerated as the widow of George Hull Ward, of the 15th Massachusetts, in the 1890 Veterans' Schedules of the US Federal Census in Jun 1890 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 25 Nov 1892 John White Kimball gave his eye-witness account of the Battle of Ball's Bluff to the Boston Journal, and it was reprinted in the Fitchburg Sentinel.
  • Emily, his wife, outlived George and died on 24 Sep 1917 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 86.
  • Emily Elizabeth Mayo survived George and was buried in Sep 1917 in Rural Cemetery, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • A photograph or image of George Hull Ward is located at The American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts, according to their website. There are also six different photos of George H. Ward at the Worcester Historical Museum.
  • Marietta Museum of History (Marietta, GA) was given a pistol that has Col. Geo. H. Ward engraved on the handle. Many thanks to Dan Cox for contributing a photo. (Click icon to view.)
  • On 28 Aug 2012 his great-grandson, David Harris Ward, died at Massachusetts at age 86.
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Emily Elizabeth Mayo b. 29 Oct 1830, d. 24 Sep 1917

  • George William Ward b. 9 Dec 1858, d. 1939
  • Robert Lincoln Ward b. 23 Feb 1861, d. 15 Jul 1927

Henry Clay Ward

b. 10 September 1843, d. 16 November 1925

Henry C. Ward
  • Father: Artemas Ward 2nd b. Sep 1796, d. 17 May 1857
  • Mother: Hulda P. Reed b. 1812, d. 27 Jun 1854
  • Company: D
  • Henry Clay Ward was born on 10 Sep 1843 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Artemas Ward 2nd and Hulda P. Reed.
  • Henry Clay Ward was enumerated in the household of Artemas Ward 2nd and Hulda P. Reed in the 1850 US Federal Census on 7 Oct 1850 at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Artemas Ward, 2nd, 53, farmer, $23,000, b. MA
    Huldah, 38, b. VT
    **George, 23, machinist, b. MA (as all others except noted)
    Caroline, 18
    Charles, 15
    **Henry, 7
    Samuel, 5
    Sarah, 3
    Frederick, 2
    Mary, 7/12
    Barry McMullens, 18, Laborer, b. Ireland
    Ann Bunn, 12, b. Ireland.
  • On 27 Jun 1854 his mother, Hulda P. Reed, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of heart disease.
  • In Jun 1854 Henry and George witnessed the burial of Hulda P. Reed, his mother, at Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 42 years.
  • On 17 May 1857 his father, Artemas Ward 2nd, died at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, of consumption at age 60.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Henry gave his occupation as carriage-trimmer.
  • Henry Clay Ward and George Hull Ward, brothers, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Henry mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a private. He was 17 years, 10 months and 2 days old.
  • Henry wrote a letter to his friend Charles D. TUCKER on 10 Nov 1861 from at Poolesville, Maryland, as follows: included courtesey of Jamie Poe:
    Poolesville Nov 10th
    Dear Friend Chas.
    I received your letter some time since and you must excuse me for not answering it before for as you must know that I have been pretty well engaged for the past three weeks.
    We have had a brush with the rebels as probably you are aware of, by this time the 15th have fought as I believe they never will again. the rebels have backed us up pretty well but there (sic) loss in killed and wounded is far greater than ours, although they had about six to our one. My brother was struck in the leg by a Minnie ball which completely shattered it and made amputation necessary. He is now at a private house in Poolesville and is doing as well as can be expected. he says in three months time he shall be able to take the field again. You humble servant escaped with a while skin and that was all although my cloths were completely riddled with bullets. I do not see how a man ever managed to escape and I never could go through it again. We fought nine hours like nigers bullets flying around us like hail they had a murdering rattle in them. Sometimes there would be a lull in the firing and then the groans of the rebel wounded were awful. Most of our men dropped with scarcely a murmur on their lips, but when we retreated it was awful they had to order us to retreat several times before we would do it for there was nothing but death behind us, a wide river with only one mud scow to cross on.
    But retreat we did and some went rolling heals over head down the bluff to the river and then plunged in with cloths equipment and all on poor fellows they either shot or drowned in the attempt a river quarter of a mile in width with a swift current is a hard stream to cross. I sat down on the bank and deliberately took my cloths off and then thought twice before plunging in but a terrible volley over my head made me start rather than be shot or taken prisoner, never expecting to reach the other shore. I took what little money and valuables I had and started and having reached midway the bullets whistled all around and many a poor fellow wen(t) under within three feet of myself. I went to the bottom twice before reaching the shore and when I did reach I thinked God for having spared me, but I was scarcely able to stand, but I met two of our boys on the shore who had swam acros and together we got blankets and started for camp a distance of 7 miles on a might cold night barefoot but we reached the camp after four hours walk on Tuesday morning Oct. 22nd and were the last one there. Col. Devens the Major and Willie Grout and myself started together about midway Grout was struck in the back of the head with a ball and says he "Tell Co D that Lieut Grout was arounded poor little fellow."
    There are thirty missing out of our Company and 350 from reg.
    Woe be to the Gen that sent across to the shore he did He will have to ans for it. The divil tries to lay it to Gen Baker but a braver man than Baker never lived and Gen Stone who commanded us instead of being with his command where he should have been, he was in the Maryland Shore witnessing it and sending dispatches to Gen Baker. All we wish is to get out of Gen Stones Brigade. He is not so popular as before the fight.
    All we wish for now is a chance to meet the devils on nearly eaqul ground and we will revenge our comrads.
    Quartermaster Howe found Willie Grout's body down near Chain Bridge, opposit Washington he had been picked up and buried four days ago. Howe had him dug up and could only recognize him by the marks on his clothing and letters in his pockets. He had him put in a coffin and sent home. Will probably be some relief to his father to get his body.
    You must excuse me at present for not writing any more but I have several letters to write so I must bid you good bye. Give my love to all inquiring friends and write soon.
    From your friend Henry
    Charles D. Tucker Esq.
  • On 22 Oct 1862 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Clay Ward was mentioned, together with 20 others, among the wounded at the Patent Office hospital in Washington, D.C.
  • On 26 Feb 1863 Henry was promoted to Sergeant-Major.
  • On 14 Mar 1863 Henry was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.
  • On 6 Apr 1863 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Clay Ward was mentioned in an article about promotions.
  • On 10 Apr 1863 at "The Southbridge Journal", Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Clay Ward was mentioned in an article listing commissions and officer promotions in the regiment, as well as which discharged or deceased officers they replaced.
  • On 2 Jul 1863 his brother, George Hull Ward, died at The Battle of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, at age 37.
  • Henry Clay Ward wrote a letter on 4 Jul 1863 as follows: (click icon to read.)
  • On 4 Sep 1863 Henry ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to resignation.

  • On 10 Feb 1864, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry was was recruiting men for the 57th Massachusetts.
    from The Worcester Palladium

    Lieut. Henry C. Ward, of this city, whose advertisement is in another column, has received authority to recruit a company for the 57th (2d veteran) regiment. Lieut. Ward is a brother of the late Col. Ward of the 15th regiment, and was among the gallant men of that regiment when they left this city in the summer of 1861. After serving nine months in the ranks he received the appointment of Sergeant Major, and was afterward commissioned second lieutenant. He participated in all of the battles of that noble regiment, and was wounded at Antietam. His company already numbers nearly fifty men, and is fast filling up. An excellent opportunity is still open to join a company whose commanding officer has seen service and knows how to take care of the men under his charge.

  • Starting 9 Mar 1864, Henry also served in the 57th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, comissioned 1st Lieutenant.
  • On 21 Oct 1864 at The Bay State House, Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Clay Ward wrote a letter read at the First Annual Reunion of the Fifteenth Regiment Association.
  • Private and Sergeant-Major, 15th Mass. Infantry, July 31, 1861.
    2d Lieutenant, 15th Mass. Infantry, April 9, 1863. Resigned September 4, 1863.
    1st Lieutenant, 57th Mass. Infantry, March 9, 1864.
    Captain, July 31, 1864. Mustered out, July 30, 1865.
    1st Lieutenant, 11th Infantry, U.S.A., February 23, 1866; accepted May 1, 1866.
    Brevet Captain, U.S.A., March 2, 1867, "for gallant and meritorious services in action at Fort Stedman, Virginia, March 24, 1865."
    Transferred to 16th Infantry, April 14, 1869.
    Captain, February 8, 1880. Major, April 26, 1898. Transferred to 12th Infantry, May 25, 1900.
    Lieutenant Colonel, 17th Infantry, December 7, 1900.
    Colonel, 15th Infantry, January 31, 1902.
    Retired October 30, 1905.
    Brigadier General, retired, October 30, 1905.
    (from the MOLLUS Register.)
  • On 12 Feb 1867 Henry Clay Ward, 23, married Susan Maria Denny, 23, daughter of Henry Augustus Denny and Eliza Edmonds Sprague, at Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • From the Diary of Joseph Addison DENNY (1804 - 1875), uncle to Susie M. Denny. Contributed by Geoffrey Woollard.
    This evening Susie M. Denny of Worcester was married to Henry C. Ward Lieut. U.S.A. and left immediately for Richmond Va. where he is at present stationed.
  • On 23 Mar 1867 From the diary of Joseph Denny,
    Wrote to Susie M. Ward Richmond Va. and to Ella C. Denny Worcester enclosing $10 in each as Wedding tokens - In the afternoon and evening the Soldiers' Monument Committee met at my office.
  • On 16 Sep 1868 From the diary of Joseph Denny,
    Bro. Henry's wife (Susan Ward's aunt), with Susie Ward & her little daughter came up in the Omnibus at noon for a visit, & Henry came up at night.
  • On 31 Jul 1872 From the diary of Joseph Addison Denny,
    On our way home we called on Susie Ward at Lucius Merrifield's, and found her quite feeble and having a cough, with strong appearance of Consumption.
  • On 26 Jan 1873 Susan Maria Denny, his wife, died at Leicester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 29 of consumption.
  • On 28 Jan 1873 Henry's wife, Susan Maria Denny, died and was buried on 28 Jan 1873 at Pine Grove Cemetery, Leicester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 29 years, 7 months and 22 days From the diary of Joseph Denny,
    Went to Worcester in the morning, and attended the funeral of our niece Mrs Susie M. Ward who died at the house of her father Henry A. Denny on Sunday at 2 1/2 P.M. Aged 29 years - She came home some months since from the South sick with Consumption and leaves a husband Capt. Henry C. Ward now stationed as a recruiting Officer for the U.S.A. in Boston, and two small children with their grand parents. Charles & Carrie & Bro. Christopher & wife attended the funeral, but Mrs Denny & Mrs Thurston were both too unwell with colds. I returned home in the afternoon with Walford, and the remains were brought to Leicester and put in the receiving tombs of Pine Grove Cemetery.
  • On 6 Dec 1876 Henry Clay Ward, 33, married Frances Crutcher Maney, 22, daughter of Brig-Gen George Earl Maney C. S. A. and Elizabeth T. Crutcher, at Davidson County, Tennessee, she was "of" Nashville, Tennessee.
  • Henry Clay Ward was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Fort Douglas, Salt Lake County, Utah, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company D, noting that he was wounded in the right hand and arm, and left knee.
  • He was enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census in 1900 at U. S. Military Post of Aparri, Philippine Islands, as:
    Ward, Henry C., Major, home, residence in the US is 55 Cedar Street, Worcester, MA, b. Sep 1843, married 20 years.
  • In 1902 Henry was living at California.
  • In 1905 retired from the Army.
  • He and Frances Crutcher Maney were enumerated in the 1920 US Federal Census in Jun 1920 at Wellesley, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, as:
    Ward, Henry C., head, 76, b. MA (his father b. MA; his mother b. VT), retired, they own their own home.
    ---, Francis M., wife, 65, b. TN
    ---, Annie D., dau, 52, single, b. VA
    ---, Arthur S., son, 50, single, b. MA, treasurer in a real estate company
    Mulcahy, Bride, (f), servant, 29, who immigrated from Ireland in 1911.
  • On 22 Jun 1923 Frances Crutcher Maney, his wife, died at Wellesley Hills, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, at age 68.
  • Henry Clay Ward died on 16 Nov 1925 at Wellesley Hills, Norfolk County, Massachusetts. He was 82 years, 2 months and 6 days old.
  • An obituary for Henry Clay Ward was published on 16 Nov 1925 at "The Worcester Telegram", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as follows: From The Worcester Telegram, 16 Nov 1925
    Brig. Gen. Ward Hero Of Many Battles Dies.
    Native of Worcester, 82, Passes Away Unexpectedly in Wellesley Hills.
    Served In U.S. Army 44 Years.
    Saw Fighting in Civil, Indian and Spanish Wars And During Phillippine Insurrection.
    Brig. Gen. Henry Clay Ward, who had achieved a reputation in the Civil War and in subsequent campaigns, a native of Worcester, died in Wellesley Hills yesterday, at the age of 82.
    Although Gen. Ward had been in failing health for some time his death was unexpected.
    Gen. Ward was in active service in the United States Army for 44 years. He retired in 1905, soon after his last promotion. He served throughout the Civil war in the Army of the Potomac and was in the battles of Ball's Bluff, the siege of Yorktown and other major engagements. He was wounded several times in conflict.
    Gen. Ward was born in Worcester Sept. 10, 1843, the son of Artemus Ward, 2nd, and Huldah Reed Ward. He was educated in the public schools of Worcester and received his military training in the army service schools.
    First Promotion In 1861.
    His first promotion of rank was as sergeant-major of the 15th Massachusetts Infantry, to which he was attached in 1861. The future general was promoted to second lieutenant on April 9, 1863, after he had given a meritorious conduct of himself in the early battles of secession.
    Seriously wounded at one of the early battles of the war of secession, he was honorably mustered out in September of the same year. In March, 1864, young Ward was back in the firing line, this time as a first lieutenant with the 57th Massachusetts Infantry. On July 31, 1864, he was promoted to captain and this rank he held until July 31, 1865, when, a few months after Lee's surrender, he was honorably discharged from voluntary service.
    But young Ward had discovered in his first war that the military life and action attracted him, and he was not many months in civilian life when he returned to, first as a second lieutenant and later as a first lieutenant in the regular army. On Oct. 30, 1905, after he had again risen to captain, been promoted to major, held the rank of colonel, he attained the rank of brigadier general.
    At the end of the same year, having given nearly a half century of distinguished service to the United States, he retired.
    Wounded At Antietam.
    To his last day Gen. Ward carried the scars of wounds received at Antietam, where he fought under Gen. Grant, who was a life-long friend of his. At Fort Stedman, Va., Gen. Ward was taken prisoner and confined in Libby prison, where he was held until the capture of Richmond, the Confederate capital and the last stronghold of the anti-abolitionists to fall to the sword of Gen. Grant.

    Gen. Ward's first promotion to captain was awarded him 'for bravery at the battle of Fort Stedman, March 24, 1865.'
    As Col. Ward, he served in the Indian campaigns of 1880, and later in the Philippines with the National Guard of Tennessee from 1892 to 1896. He was made brigadier general, commanding. In 1895, though, the permanent promotion was not yet bestowed upon him until 1905.
    Gen. Ward was a member of the Loyal Legion, Grand Army of the Republic, the Spanish American War Veterans, Associated Veterans of Mexican Wars, the Military Service Institution, the Pendennis club, Louisville, Ky., Union club, Boston, and the Army and Navy club, Manila.
    Gen. Ward married Susie M. Denny, Feb. 12, 1867, who died shortly after their marriage. On Dec. 6, 1876, he married Frances Crutcher Maney of Nashville, Tenn., who died many years ago.
    The general is survived by one brother, Fred W. Ward, 52 Cedar street, Worcester.
  • An obituary for Henry Clay Ward was published on 17 Nov 1925 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, as follows: From The New York Times, 17 Nov 1925
    Gen. Henry Clay Ward Dies At The Age Of 82.
    Fought Throughout the Civil War, was Wounded – Got Brevet for Bravery.

    Wellesley Hills, Mass., Nov. 16 (AP).
    – Brig. Gen. Henry Clay Ward, Civil War veteran, died today at his home here at the age of 82.
    He was born in Worcester, son of Artemas Ward 2nd, and was educated in the public schools there. Forty-four years of his life were spent in army service. His retirement was in 1905. He served throughout the Civil War, in the Army of the Potomac, and was in the battle of Ball's Bluff, the siege of Yorktown and other engagements. He was wounded several times.
    General Ward was captured while taking part in the siege of Fort Stedman, Va., and was confined in Libby Prison from March 25, 1865, until the capture of Richmond, when he rejoined his regiment and continued with it until Lee's surrender. He was breveted Captain for bravery in the action about Fort Stedman.
    General Ward is survived by a daughter, Miss Ward of Wellesley Hills, and a son Arthur L. Ward, of this city, a veteran of the French Ambulance Service and the Serbian Relief Expedition in the World War.
  • He was buried in Nov 1925 at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia.
  • On 22 Oct 1926 at "The Webster Evening Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Henry Clay Ward was remembered at the 60th reunion of Company I as among those who had died within the previous year. (click icon to read.)
  • Anne Denny Ward, his daughter, survived Henry and died in 1952 She was unmarried and is buried with Henry at Arlington National Cemetery.
  • Credits: Primary photo above by permission of the Worcester Historical Museum, Ward Collection.
  • Last Edited: 27 Apr 2016

Family 1: Susan Maria Denny b. 6 Jun 1843, d. 26 Jan 1873

  • Anne Denny Ward b. 29 Dec 1867, d. 1952
  • Arthur Sprague Ward b. 28 Jul 1869, d. 26 May 1934

Family 2: Frances Crutcher Maney b. 1 Jul 1854, d. 22 Jun 1923

Hiram J. Ward

b. January 1841, d. 22 January 1917
  • Father: Hiram F. Ward b. 1810, d. 1853
  • Mother: Amanda M. Trask b. 9 Jun 1812, d. 10 Oct 1882
  • Company: I
  • Hiram J. Ward was born in Jan 1841 at Thompson, Windham County, Connecticut, son of Hiram F. Ward and Amanda M. Trask.
  • Hiram J. Ward was enumerated in the household of Hiram F. Ward and Amanda M. Trask in the 1850 US Federal Census on 22 Aug 1850 at Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island, as:
    Hiram F. Ward, 40, shoemaker, b. PA
    Amanda, 40, b. RI (as were all the children)
    Leander, 14
    Gilbert, 13
    **Hram, 9
    Walter, 6
    Lucy P., 67, b. CT.
  • In 1853 his father, Hiram F. Ward, died at Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island.
  • Hiram J. Ward was enumerated in the household of Amanda M. Trask in the 1860 US Federal Census on 2 Jun 1860 at Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Amanda Ward, 47, b. RI
    **Hiram, 19, shoemaker, b. CT
    Lucy, 7, b. RI.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Hiram gave his occupation as shoemaker.
  • In 1861 Hiram was living at Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 25 May 1861 Hiram mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 20 years and 4 months old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • John Floyd Maley wrote a letter to The Webster Times, listing his fellow prisoners, on 27 Oct 1861 from Richmond, Virginia, mentioning Hiram J. Ward, as follows.
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Hiram J. Ward was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Weekley Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Hiram J. Ward was listed as a Company I casualty of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Hiram J. Ward was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 20 Nov 1861 at "The Worcester Daily Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Hiram J. Ward was listed with 195 other men among the prisoners taken at Ball's Bluff.
  • On 22 Feb 1862 at "The New York Times", New York City, New York, Hiram J. Ward was mentioned, with 61 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in an article about the return of prisoners under a flag of truce:
    National Prisoners Released, Arrival of Four hundred at Fortres Monroe
    Notice having been received by Gen. Wool, that some 400 exchanged prisoners would be sent down the James River Yesterday, the "George Washington" and "Express" left at about noon for the appointed meeting place.
    The rebel boat was appointed to meet us at 3 o'clock, but at that time she was not in sight, and shortly after a heavy fog shut down, making it impossible to move in any direction. The two boats were then fastened together, and having dropped anchor, waited for the rebel boat to appear.
    The fog did not lift till late in the evening, when the wind blew so fresh that the boats dragged their anchors and had to be separated. This morning at sunrise the expected prisoners made their appearance, on the "William Allison," which it seemed had also anchored for the night a few miles above us. The return passage was made without any incident, and the prisoners arrived here about 10 o'clock this forenoon. The returned prisoners will be immediately sent north. (Note: here follows a complete list of the released prisoners who arrived by a flag of truce from Richmond.)
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Hiram was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland.
  • Walter Baker Ward, his brother, served in the the 18th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, Co. B.
  • On 23 Feb 1863 Hiram ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 22 Sep 1864 his brother, Gilbert Ward, died at Andersonville Prison, Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, of dysentery, having served as a Sergeant with the 11th Connecticut Infantry.
  • On 17 Apr 1865 Hiram J. Ward, 24, married Emma Azubah Taft, 23, daughter of Adna Taft and Emma Cragin, at Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for both.
  • Hiram J. Ward made application for a veteran's pension on 4 Mar 1868, and received certificate number 15034.
  • In 1879 his account of imprisonment after Ball's Bluff was included in the History of Douglas, Massachusetts, by Wm. A. Emerson:
    Hiram Ward was wounded in the arm, taken prisoner, and confined at Libby Prison, Richmond, four months, when he was exchanged and returned to his regiment. At our request he has furnished a brief account of his experiences while in rebeldom.
    After being captured at Ball's Bluff he was marched with nearly 500 other Union prisoners to Manassas Junction. While resting from their fatiguing march, a small amount of corn bread and bacon was issued, and the boys, not having tasted food since going into action on the morning of the 21st, made quick work of eating, and were soon ready to go forward.
    The trip to Richmond was made in coal cars, and to add to their other misfortunes it began to rain. Arriving at their destination and leaving the cars, they were marched in a procession through the principal streets of the city to be inspected by the people who turned out in large numbers, crowding the sidewalks and temporary stagings which had been hastily erected.
    It soon became evident that the news of their defeat had preceded them. General Evans, commander of the rebel forces at Ball's Bluff, in his dispatches had grossly exaggerated the facts by stating that he had driven four times their number from the soil of Virginia, and killed and wounded a larger number than there were men engaged in the fight. In consequence of which the people were inflated with an inordinate conceit of their own bravery and contempt for what they believed to be Yankee cowardice. This popular feeling was openly expressed all along the line of march, until they reached the place selected for their temporary confinement, a large building formerly used as a tobacco warehouse.
    Here they were confined for a short time and then transferred to Libby Prison, where for two months they were not allowed a change of clothing, and for the first three months slept upon the bare floor without even straw to lie upon. The fourth month straw was provided, which greatly increased their comfort. During this time our informant witnessed the shooting of several prisoners. One moonlight night two men were shot and instantly killed while standing side by side near one of the windows. A New York Zouave also shared a similar fate a few days afterwards. During most of this time the prison was so crowded there was scarcely room for the men to lie down at night, and deaths were of almost daily occurrence.
    After being exchanged, Mr. Ward rejoined his regiment and entered upon active service.
    At the battle of Antietam Sept. 17, 1862, was badly wounded in the right hand; received an honorable discharge Feb. 23, 1863, and returned home.
  • He and Emma Azubah Taft were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census in Jun 1880 at Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts, where he is a Day Laborer.
  • On 29 May 1882 Hiram's daughter, Emma Rose Ward married Theodore T. Von Kamecke.
  • Hiram J. Ward was enumerated in the 1890 US Federal census, Veteran's Schedule in Jun 1890 at Mendon, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as having served in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Company I, noting that he was wounded on the hand, arm and ankle, and that the spent four months in prison and three months in the hospital.
  • He and Emma Azubah Taft were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 16 Jun 1900 at Grafton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Hiram Ward, b. Jan 1841, married 35 years, b. CT (fat b. PA, mor b. RI), farm labor
    Emma, wife, b. Nov 1840, her one child still living
    (with his daughter nextdoor)
    Rose von Kamaske, head, b. Mar 1866, married 18 years, all 8 of her children living, b. MA (fat, b. CT, mor b. MA)
    Theodore, son b. Sep 1884, farm labor
    Rose, daur, b. Jan 1887
    Lucinda, daur, b. Dec 1888
    Dorothea, daur, b. Sep 1840
    David, son, b. Dec 1892
    Ralph, son b. Feb 1894
    Henry, son, b. May 1896
    Ferdinand, son b. Oct 1897.
  • On 20 Oct 1903 Emma Azubah Taft, his wife, died at Hubbardston, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 61.
  • Hiram J. Ward was enumerated in the 1910 US Federal Census on 22 Apr 1910 at Barre, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Ward, Hiram, 69, widower, b. CT
    von Kamecke, Louise, grand-daur, 21, single, b. MA (fath b. NY, mor b. MA), librarian
    von Kamecke, Dorotha, grand-daur, 19, single, b. MA (fath b. NY, mor b. MA.)
  • He died on 22 Jan 1917. He was 76 years old.
  • He was buried in Jan 1917 at Douglas Center Cemetery, Douglas, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Plot: Section FR.
  • Last Edited: 17 May 2016

Family: Emma Azubah Taft b. 21 Nov 1841, d. 20 Oct 1903

  • Emma Rose Ward b. 14 Mar 1866, d. 10 May 1924

Edward Franklin Ware

b. 28 August 1835, d. 23 September 1861

Edward F. Ware
  • Father: Archibald Hazen Ware b. 18 Jul 1806, d. 5 Jul 1852
  • Mother: Caroline Cutler Cooley b. 10 Aug 1809, d. 23 Aug 1878
  • Company: F
  • Edward Franklin Ware was born on 28 Aug 1835 at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Archibald Hazen Ware and Caroline Cutler Cooley.
  • On 5 Jul 1852 his father, Archibald Hazen Ware, died at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 45.
  • In 1852, at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edward was involved in a guardianship proceeding at the probate court.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Caroline Cutler Cooley in the 1860 US Federal Census in Jun 1860 at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    Albert Lincke, 27, farmer, b. VT
    Julia L., 27, b. MA (as were all the rest)
    George H., 5
    Carrie M., 6/12
    Caroline C. Ware, 56 (his mother)
    **Edward G. (sic), 24, boot tester
    Charles A., 13.
  • He was married at the time of his enlistment, according to Ford's history. If so, then he was apparently married after the 1860 census.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, Edward gave his occupation as shoemaker.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Edward mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Brookfield, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 25 years, 10 months and 14 days old.
  • He died on 23 Sep 1861 at Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, of disease, the second man in the regiment to die. He was 26 years and 26 days old.
  • He was buried on 23 Sep 1861 at Poolesville Cemetery, Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland.
  • On 16 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Edward Franklin Ware was mentioned as follows (Volume 91 # 41):
    Poolesville, Oct. 8, 1861.
    Corporal Hildreth, of the Fitchburg company, died last evening. he was a young man about nineteen years old, must esteemed in his company. his death was occasioned by what the doctors call “calcareous deterioration of the liver.” He had for some time been troubled by a bad cough resulting from the disease, but have been confined to the hospital only a few days. his father and mother reside in Oakham. this is the third death that has occurred in the regiment since it left Worcester. The others were Melvin Howland, orderly sergeant of the Blackstone company, and Edward F. Ware of the Brookfield company. their graves are pleasantly marked in a cemetery of the village, and the grave stones, arbor vitae, and rose bushes, show how affectionately they are remembered by their comrades of the regiment. Dr. Bates being sick, a great deal of the work falls to Dr. Haven, the assistant surgeon, who gives it through attention.
  • On 16 Nov 1861, Edward F. Ware, his nephew, son of his brother George H. and Charlotte (Allen) Ware, was named for Edward Franklin Ware.
  • On 5 Nov 1863 his brother, George H. Ware, died at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 33 of disease.
  • Caroline, his mother, outlived Edward and died on 23 Aug 1878 at Oakham, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 69.
  • Last Edited: 27 Apr 2016

Frederick A. Warner

b. 1827, d. 9 March 1883
  • Father: John or Paul Werner
  • Mother: Susan [--?--]
  • Company: K
  • Frederick A. Warner was born about in 1827 at Germany, son of John or Paul Werner and Susan [--?--].
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Frederick gave his occupation as weaver.
  • In 1861 Frederick was living at Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

  • On 1 Jul 1861 Frederick mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Blackstone, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 34 years old.
  • He was declared missing in action on 30 Jun 1862 at Nelson's Farm, Virginia.
  • On 31 Jan 1863 Frederick ended military service with the 15th Massachusetts due to disability.

  • On 1 Feb 1863 Frederick A. Werner married Nancy Booth, daughter of William Booth and Jane Harris, at Woonsocket, Providence County, Rhode Island, in a first marriage for both, and the marriage was registered in Blackstone.
  • Frederick A. Warner was enumerated in the household of William Booth and Jane Harris in the 1870 US Federal Census on 13 Jun 1870 at Wareham P. O., Middleborough, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, with his in-laws, as:
    Booth, W. 78, b. Ireland
    ---, Jane, 70, b. Ireland
    **Warner, Fred, 50, no occupation given, b. Germany
    ---, Nancy, 40, b. Ireland.
  • Frederick A. Warner and Nancy Booth were enumerated in the 1880 US Federal census on 19 Jun 1880 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, as:
    Walker (sic), Frederic A., 58, laborer (?), b. Germany
    ---, Nancy, 51, wife, b. Ireland
    Booth, William 86, father-in-law, b. Ireland
    ---, Jane, 80, mor-in-law, b. Ireland.
  • Frederick A. Werner died on 9 Mar 1883 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was 56 years old.
  • On 21 Nov 1911 Nancy Booth received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Frederick's service; his wife, received certificate number 348834. (Note: year is very difficult to read.)
  • Last Edited: 1 Apr 2013

Family: Nancy Booth b. 1829

James Gardner Warner

b. between 1829 and 1830, d. 21 October 1861
  • Father: Nathan Ball Warner b. 22 Mar 1779
  • Mother: Mary Phelps b. 1788, d. 13 Oct 1869
  • Company: I
  • James Gardner Warner was born between 1829 - 1830 at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Nathan Ball Warner and Mary Phelps.
  • His father, Nathan Ball Warner, died.
  • On 4 Aug 1835 James's widowed mother, Mary Phelps, remarried to Joseph Davis at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James's sister, Lucy W. Warner, married Hannibal Colburn.
  • His step-father, Joseph Davis, died.
  • On 10 Mar 1849 James's sister, Abigail Warner, married Elijah Parmater at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • James Gardner Warner was enumerated in the household of Elijah Parmater and Abigail Warner in the 1850 US Federal Census on 19 Aug 1850 at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, with his brother-in-law, as:
    Elijah PARMATER, 37, m, farmer, b. MA (as were all in household)
    Abagail (née Warner), 24, f,
    Mary M., 1, f
    Lavinia SAWTELL, 50, f, b. MA
    Mary DAVIS, 62, f, b. MA (his mother)
    **James G. WARNER, 21, m, laborer, b. MA
    (Note: James, was close neighbors of Franklin Farnsworth and Robert Moses, who both also died in service with the 15th MVI.)
  • James Gardner Warner was enumerated in the 1860 US Federal census on 3 Jul 1860 at Harvard P. O., Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, as:
    James G. Warner, 30, farmer, b. MA (as were all in the household)
    Mary Davis, 72
    Darwin Phelps, 56, farmer
    Abigail, 64.
  • In 1861 James was living at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, James gave his occupation as a farmer.
  • James was married at the time of his enlistment, according to Ford's history. However, the pension file index says it was his mother who received a pension to surviving family. (Open issue. Aug 2007.)

  • On 12 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • He was declared missing in action on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, and presumed dead.
  • He died on 21 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia.
  • The following from Marvin's history of Lancaster --
    "He was in the battle of Ball's Bluff, was seen on the bank of the river, but never after; was probably shot while swimming the Potomac. He left a widowed mother wholly dependent on him for support."
  • On 30 Oct 1861 at "The Worcester Spy", Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, James Gardner Warner was included, with 304 other men, among "The Killed Wounded and Missing of the Fifteenth Regiment," after Ball's Bluff.
  • On 1 Nov 1862 Mary Davis received a pension to surviving family member based on James's service; his mother, received certificate number 11108.
  • In 1868 James Gardner Warner was included on the Civil War memorial at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, on the tablets at Lancaster Town Library.
  • In 1879, James was mentioned in Marvin's history of Lancaster.
  • Last Edited: 4 Sep 2014

William H. Warner

b. November 1840, d. 13 December 1910
  • Company: 1_SS
  • William H. Warner was born in Nov 1840 at Salisbury, Connecticut.
  • At the time of his enlistment, William gave his occupation as Mariner.
  • In 1862 William was living at Connecticut.

  • On 1 Nov 1862 William H. Warner mustered into service with the 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters. He was 22 years old.
  • On 2 Sep 1864 William ended military service with the 1st Massachusetts Sharpshooters by mustering out.

  • He made application for a veteran's pension on 24 Jul 1867, and received certificate number 89651.
  • On 21 Dec 1874, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, William was admitted.
  • On 25 Sep 1875, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, William was discharged on his own request.
  • On 20 Oct 1887 William H. Warner, 46, married Martha Cornelia Mitchell, 34.
  • William H. Warner and Martha Cornelia Mitchell were enumerated in the 1900 US Federal census on 30 Jun 1900 at Civil District 2, Knox County, Tennessee, as:
    Warner, William H., b. Nov 1840, married 15 years, b. CT (fat b. ??, mor b. England
    ---, Cornelia, wife, b. July 1853, 46, no children, b. TN (parents b. Georgia.)
  • On 11 Feb 1905, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, William was admitted.
  • On 26 Apr 1905, William was discharged on his own request.
  • On 19 Nov 1907, at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, William was admitted "on condition he assign one half of his pension to his wife."
  • He died on 13 Dec 1910 at National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee. He was 70 years and 1 month old.
  • He was buried in Dec 1910 at Mountain Home National Cemetery, Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, Sec D, Row 5, Grave no. 13.
  • On 31 Dec 1910 Martha Cornelia Warner received a pension to surviving family member in Tennessee based on William's service; his wife, received certificate number 718683.
  • Martha outlived William and died on 29 Jun 1927 at age 73.
  • He and Martha Cornelia Mitchell had no issue.
  • Last Edited: 17 May 2016

Family: Martha Cornelia Mitchell b. 1 Jul 1853, d. 29 Jun 1927

Charles Edward Warren

b. 6 March 1843, d. 2 October 1862
  • Father: Edward Warren b. 27 May 1811, d. 22 Sep 1875
  • Mother: Cornelia Stone b. 30 Jun 1815, d. 6 Nov 1907
  • Company: C
  • Charles Edward Warren was born on 6 Mar 1843 at Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, son of Edward Warren and Cornelia Stone.
  • On 6 May 1857 Charles's sister, Mary Susan Warren, married George Blodgett Wood at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • Before 1861 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Edward Warren as a resident, was a member of "The Clinton Guards."
  • In 1861 Charles was living at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Charles gave his occupation as farmer.
  • Charles Edward Warren and Waldo Barrett Maynard, friends, served together in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in Company C.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Charles mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, being credited to the quota of Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 18 years, 4 months and 6 days old.
  • On 17 Sep 1862 Charles was wounded at The Battle of Antietam, Washington County, Maryland, on the thigh.
  • On 24 Sep 1862 his friend, Waldo Barrett Maynard, died at Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland, at age 24 unmarried, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam.
  • Charles Edward Warren died on 2 Oct 1862 at Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland, unmarried, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam, and it was registered in Northboro, MA. He was 19 years, 6 months and 26 days old.
  • He was buried on 16 Dec 1862 at Howard Street Cemetery, Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Grave No. 2, Sect. 7, Lot 68, where his parents later joined him.
  • At Unitarian Church, Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles Edward Warren and Waldo Barrett Maynard were buried in a
    Double Funeral: Their bodies were brought home at the expense of the town and buried on the same day from the Unitarian Church. It was an impressive service and made a deep impression on those who witnessed it.
    These boys were schoolmates; their fathers before them were schoolmates; they enlisted at the same time, were wounded in the same battle, died only one week apart, their bodies were brought home together and were buried on the same day. (History of Northborough.)
  • On 26 Nov 1867 Charles's sister, Abbie Cornelia Warren, married John Andrew Eames at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • On 17 Sep 1870, at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Charles was inscribed on the town Civil War monument.
  • On 29 Nov 1878 Charles's widowed mother, Cornelia Stone, remarried to Curtis Rice, 63, at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, in a second marriage for both.
  • On 11 Sep 1884 Cornelia Stone received a pension to surviving family member in Massachusetts based on Charles's service; his mother, received certificate number 346129.
  • On 17 Sep 1900 Charles E. Warren was included on the Civil War memorial at Antietam Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland, as having died of his wounds received at the battle. (Read several articles from the Fitchburg Sentinel about the planning for the memorial.)
  • Cornelia, his mother, outlived Charles and died on 6 Nov 1907 at Northborough, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 92.
  • The Greenwood Genealogy says that he
    ...enlisted in the war against the Rebellion, private in Co. C, 15th Massachusetts Regiment, had been through 7 battles and early in the battle of Antietam was wounded in the hip, lay 48 hours in the rebel lines on the battlefield. After the rebels retreated, his friends took him to Hoffman hospital near Keedysville, Md., and at the end of two weeks his leg was removed, but he lived only nine hours. He bore up with great fortitude; d. Oct. 2, 1862; buried in his home in Northboro.
  • Last Edited: 13 Apr 2016

Moses James Warren

b. 2 April 1828, d. 25 October 1861
  • Father: Moses Warren b. between 1787 - 1788
  • Mother: Mary [--?--] b. between 1806 - 1807
  • Company: I
  • Moses James Warren was born between 1827 - 1828 at Ireland, son of Moses Warren and Mary [--?--].
  • Moses James Warren was baptized on 2 Apr 1828 at Saint Patricks York Road-Roman Catholic, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.
  • He was enumerated in the household of Moses Warren and Mary [--?--] in the 1841 UK Census in Apr 1841 at Batley, Yorkshire, England, as:
    Moses Warren, 45, woolen weaver, b. Ireland
    Mary, 35, b. Ireland
    Robert, 15, b. ireland
    Edward, 15, b. Yorkshire
    **Moses James, 13, b. Yorkshire
    Joseph, 8, b. Yorkshire
    Elizabeth, 5, b. Yorkshire
    William, 3, b. Yorkshire
    John, 3 mos, b. Yorkshire.
  • On 3 Oct 1851 James Warren, 23, married Anna E. McCrystal, daughter of Daniel McCrystal and Mary [--?--], at Lawrence, Essex County, Massachusetts, in a first marriage for botth.
  • In 1861 Moses was living at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Moses gave his occupation as spinner.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 James mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry as a Sergeant. He was 33 years, 3 months and 10 days old.
  • He died on 25 Oct 1861 at The Battle of Ball's Bluff, Leesburg, Virginia, where he was missing and presumed dead. He was 33 years, 6 months and 23 days old.
  • He was buried on 25 Oct 1861 at Poolesville Cemetery, Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland.
  • On 2 Nov 1861 at "The Webster Weekley Times", Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Moses James Warren was listed as a Company I casualty of Ball's Bluff.
  • On 9 Nov 1861 Moses James Warren was mentioned, along with 95 other men of the 15th Massachusetts, in a report of 9 Nov 1861 to the Webster Times, by F. Q. Robinson, concerning the aftermath of Ball's Bluff and reporting his status.
  • On 24 Jul 1863 his brother, Edward Warren, died at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, killed by "cars", as a member of the 51st Massachusetts Infantry. (Click icon to read newspaper report.)
  • On 16 Oct 1863 Anna E. McCrystal received a pension to surviving family member in Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, based on Moses's service; his wife, received certificate number 24667.
  • On 25 Apr 1881 Moses and Anna's son, Daniel Moses Warren married Annie Hughes at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
  • Anna, his wife, outlived Moses and died on 15 Sep 1893 at Canton, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, according to the pension, however this has not yet been verified in MA records.
  • On 4 Jul 1907 Moses James Warren was included on the Civil War memorial at Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, according to an article in the Webster Times. See the "Documents" section at the main website for an account of the festivities of dedication.
  • Last Edited: 27 Apr 2016

Family: Anna E. McCrystal b. 1829, d. 15 Sep 1893

  • William James Warren b. 3 Jul 1852
  • Daniel Moses Warren b. 26 Sep 1854
  • Elizabeth Ann Warren b. 26 Oct 1856, d. Dec 1866
  • Daughter Warren b. 20 Oct 1861, d. 20 Oct 1861
  • Daughter Warren b. 10 Jan 1862

Franklin S. Waterman

b. 1842, d. 10 June 1862
  • Father: Jotham Waterman b. 20 Feb 1807, d. 12 Jan 1844
  • Mother: Phebe Ann Swift b. 4 Jul 1810, d. 1 Jan 1866
  • Company: H
  • Franklin S. Waterman was born in 1842 at Warren, Bristol County, Rhode Island, son of Jotham Waterman and Phebe Ann Swift.
  • On 12 Jan 1844 his father, Jotham Waterman, died at Fairhaven, Bristol County, Massachusetts, at age 36.
  • In 1861 Franklin was living at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts.
  • At the time of his enlistment in the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Franklin gave his occupation as machinist.

  • On 12 Jul 1861 Franklin mustered into service with the 15th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was 19 years old.
  • He died on 10 Jun 1862 at Virginia unmarried, of typhoid fever. He was 20 years old.
  • In 1867 at Northbridge, Worcester County, Massachusetts, There is an administration of estate for Franklin S. Waterman. (Note: the date may be 1862.)
  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2012